Manufacturer: Inateck

One hub to rule them all!

Inateck sent along a small group of connectivity devices for us to evaluate. One such item was their HB7003 7 port USB 3.0 hub:

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This is a fairly standard powered USB hub with one exception - high speed charging. Thanks to an included 36W power adapter and support for Battery Charging Specification 1.2, the HB7003 can charge devices at up to 1.5 Amps at 5 Volts. This is not to be confused with 'Quick Charging', which uses a newer specification and more unique hardware.

Specifications:

  • L/W/H: 6.06" x 1.97" x 0.83"
  • Ports: 7
  • Speed: USB 3.0 5Gbps (backwards compatible with USB 2.0 and 1.1)
  • Windows Vista / OSX 10.8.4 and newer supported without drivers

Packaging:

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Densely packed brown box. Exactly how such a product should be packaged.

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Power adapter (~6 foot cord), ~4.5 foot USB 3.0 cord, instruction manual, and the hub itself.

Charging:

Some quick charging tests revealed that the HB7003 had no issue exceeding 1.0 Amp charging rates, but fell slightly short of a full 1.5A charge rate due to the output voltage falling a little below the full 5V. Some voltage droop is common with this sort of device, but it did have some effect. In one example, an iPad Air drew 1.3A (13% short of a full 1.5A). Not a bad charging rate considering, but if you are expecting a fast charge of something like an iPad, its dedicated 2.1A charger is obviously the better way to go.

Performance and Usability:

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As you can see above, even though the port layout is on a horizontal plane, Inateck has spaced the ports enough that most devices should be able to sit side by side. Some wider devices may take up an extra port, but with seven to work with, the majority of users should have enough available ports even if one or two devices overlap an adjacent port. In the above configuration, we had no issue saturating the throughput to each connected device. I also stepped up to a Samsung USB T1 which also negotiated at the expected USB 3.0 speeds.

Pricing and Availability

Inateck is selling it these direct from their Amazon store (link above).

Conclusion:

Pros:

  • Clean design 7-port USB 3.0 hub.
  • Port spacing sufficient for most devices without interference.
  • 1.5A per port charging.
  • Low cost.

Cons:

  • 'Wall wart' power adapter may block additional power strip outlets.

At just $35, the Inateck HB7003 is a good quality 7-port USB 3.0 hub. All ports can charge devices at up to 1.5A while connecting them to the host at data rates up to 5 Gbps. The only gripe I had was that the hub was a bit on the light weight side and as a result it easily slid around on the desk when the attached cords were disturbed, but some travelers might see light weight as a bonus. Overall this is a simple, no frills USB 3.0 hub that gets the job done nicely.

Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: Inateck

You love the dock!

Today we'll take a quick look at the Inateck FD2002 USB 3.0 to dual SATA dock:

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This is a UASP capable dock that should provide near full SATA 6Gb/sec throughput to each of two connected SATA SSDs or HDDs. This particular dock has no RAID capability, but exchanges that for an offline cloning / duplication mode. While the FD2002 uses ASMedia silicon to perform these tasks, similar limitations are inherent in competing hardware fron JMicron, which comes with a similar toggle of either RAID or cloning capability. Regardless, Inateck made the logical choice with the FD2002, as hot swap docks are not the best choice for hardware RAID.

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The pair of ASMedia chips moving data within the FD2002. The ASM1153E on the left couples the USB 3.0 link to the ASM1091R, which multiplexes to the pair of SATA ports and apparently adds cloning functionality.

Continue reading for our review of the Inateck FD2002 USB 3.0 Dual SATA Dock!

Connected Data Adds NAS Integration to Transporter 75 and 150 Cloud Storage Appliances

Subject: Storage | June 16, 2015 - 05:21 PM |
Tagged: transporter, NAS, dropbox, connected data

Today Connected Data (makers of Drobo) announced NAS integration with their Transporter 75 and 150 business private cloud storage devices.

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The premise of this addition is simple. Businesses can simply point a Transporter 75 or 150 unit at their local NAS device and have that storage accessible via the usual Transporter methods. These work very much like Dropbox, where files can be synced across systems or available from a remote source, except in this case the 'could' is provided by a box located and secured at the business offices.

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Transporter devices can also be added to smaller branch offices or other locations. Those remote locations can keep a subset (or all) of the data from the main office, preventing the need to have a full copy of all data synced across each and every system. The Transporter Desktop app can map shared folders and access them straight off of the network. Shares can also be synced with a local copy if the user chooses to do so.

It's good to see Connected Data continue to develop this platform, and we hope to see this NAS integration feature added to the smaller capacity 15 and 30 models as this would help speed adoption and integration for smaller businesses that have started out with all content on a smaller local NAS.

Full press blast after the break.

A new J-Micron controller for ADATA's Premier SP600 128GB SSD

Subject: Storage | June 15, 2015 - 05:31 PM |
Tagged: adata, Premier SP600, JMF670H, jmicron

ADATA's Premier SP600 SSD family is aimed at the budget conscious consumer, it is not often you see 32 and 64GB drives released along side the more common 128, 256 and 512GB models.  The previous Premier Pro 128GB is selling for $50 so you can expect a similar or lower price for models with the new controller.  Mad Shrimps benchmarked the drive and saw great results while the drive was fresh and empty of data but the performance dipped after the  drive began to fill up.  On the other hand at such a price and with a three year warranty you should not discount the drive altogether but there are certainly other choices at a similar price point.

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"The new revision of the ADATA Premier SP600 SSD is incorporating one of the newer Jmicron JMF670H controller, which is accompanied by one Nanya NT5CB64M16FP-DH as buffer and also eight ADATA-branded MLC NAND Flash memory chips. Premier SP600 is meant for the entry to mainstream market and while the product succeeds to deliver good read speeds, it fails to impress in the writes department."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Source: Mad Shrimps

Portable wireless storage from Samsung

Subject: Storage | June 8, 2015 - 07:15 PM |
Tagged: Samsung, wireless storage, 1.5tb drive

If you find yourself running low on space on your phone and need a handy way to extend your storage you could consider the Samsung Wireless HDD.  A mere 19.9x89x126.5mm and 275g it won't take up a lot of space but will allow up to five devices to connect over 802.11 b/g/n WiFi to stream the content stored on the drive.  It also has USB 3.0 connectivity to help you load up the drive before you head out on the road and you can even steal some of it's 7 hour rated battery life by using it as a charging station for your phone.  Kitguru tested multiple streams and found that two simultaneous connections work perfectly but it is best not to exceed streaming to a pair of devices.  The five device rating seems to refer more to the number of saved connections than to the number of streams you can run.

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"While many users these days may have several terabytes of PC storage space, mobile storage is yet to catch up. Many phones come with just 16GB of internal storage, while 128GB is just about as good as it gets. This means most users simply cannot fit their media collections on their mobile devices – which is far from ideal."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Source: KitGuru

The Connector Formerly Known as SFF-8639 - Now Called U.2

Subject: Storage | June 8, 2015 - 04:04 PM |
Tagged: U.2, ssd, SFF-8639, pcie, NVMe, Intel, computex 2015, computex

Intel has announced that the SSD Form Factor Working Group has finally come up with a name to replace the long winded SFF-8639 label currently applied to 2.5" devices that connect via PCIe.

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As Hardwarezone peeked in the above photo, the SFF-8639 connector will now be called U.2 (spoken 'U dot 2'). This appropriately corresponds with the M.2 connector currently used in portable and small form factor devices today, just with a new letter before the dot.

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An M.2 NVMe PCIe device placed on top of a U.2 NVMe PCIe device.

Just as how the M.2 connector can carry SATA and PCIe signaling, the U.2 connector is an extension of the SATA / SAS standard connectors:

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Not only are there an additional 7 pins between the repurposed SATA data and power pins, there are an additional 40 pins on the back side. These can carry up to PCIe 3.0 x4 to the connected device. Here is what those pins look like on a connector itself:

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Further details about the SFF-8639 / U.2 connector can be seen in the below slide, taken from the P3700 press briefing:

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With throughputs of up to 4 GB/sec and the ability to employ the new low latency NVMe protocol, the U.2 and M.2 standards are expected to quickly overtake the need for SATA Express. An additional look at the U.2 standard (then called SFF-8639), as well as a means of adapting from M.2 to U.2, can be found in our Intel SSD 750 Review.

Source: Hardwarezone
Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: Intel
Tagged: SSD 750, pcie, NVMe, IOPS, Intel

It's been a while since we reviewed Intel's SSD 750 PCIe NVMe fire-breathing SSD, and since that launch we more recently had some giveaways and contests. We got the prizes in to be sent out to the winners, but before that happened, we had this stack of hardware sitting here. It just kept staring down at me (literally - this is the view from my chair):

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That stack of 5 Intel SSD 750’s was burning itself into my periphery as I worked on an upcoming review of the new Seiki Pro 40” 4K display. A few feet in the other direction was our CPU testbed machine, an ASUS X99-Deluxe with a 40-lane Intel Core i7-5960 CPU installed. I just couldn't live with myself if we sent these prizes out without properly ‘testing’ them first, so then this happened:

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This will not be a typical complete review, as this much hardware in parallel is not realistically comparable to even the craziest power user setup. It is more just a couple of hours of playing with an insane hardware configuration and exploring the various limits and bottlenecks we were sure to run into. We’ll do a few tests in a some different configurations and let you know what we found out.

Continue reading for the results of our little experiment!

Computex 2015: Kingston microDuo 3C USB Type-C Flash Drive

Subject: Storage | June 3, 2015 - 09:15 AM |
Tagged: usb type-c, microDuo 3C, kingston, flash drive, computex 2015

Kingston has announced a new high-speed USB flash drive with the new Type-C connector, and the dual-interface drive also works with standard USB Type-A devices.

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The microDuo 3C offers read speeds up to 100MB/s and 15MB/s writes for the 32GB and 64GB models, with write speeds of 10MB/s on the 16GB version.

Specifications from Kingston:

  • Capacities: 16GB, 32GB and 64GB
  • Speed: USB 3.13
  • 16GB: 100MB/s read, 10MB/s write
  • 32GB & 64GB: 100MB/s read, 15MB/s write
  • Dimensions : 29.94mm x 16.60mm x 8.44mm
  • Warranty / Support : Five-year warranty with free technical support
  • Pricing was not revealed, but the drive will ship later this month so we will find out soon.

    Source: Kingston

    Computex 2015: Micron Announces 16nm TLC For Consumer SSDs

    Subject: Storage, Shows and Expos | June 2, 2015 - 11:47 PM |
    Tagged: tlc, ssd, micron, flash, computex 2015, computex, 16nm

    Chugging right along that TechInsights Flash Roadmap we saw last year, Micron has announced the TLC extension to their 16nm flash memory process node.

    Micron Roadmap.png

    While 16nm TLC was initially promised Q4 of 2014, I believe Micron distracted themselves a little with their dabbles into Dynamic Write Acceleration technology. No doubt wanting to offer ever more cost effective SSDs to their portfolio, the new TLC 16nm flash will take up less die space for the same capacity, meaning more dies per 300mm wafer, ultimately translating to lower cost/GB of consumer SSDs.

    micron_128gb_16nm_nand_flash.jpg

    Micron's 16nm (MLC) flash

    The Crucial MX200 and BX100 SSDs have already been undercutting the competition in cost/GB, so the possibility of even lower cost SSDs is a more than welcome idea - just so long as they can keep the reliability of these parts high enough. IMFT has a very solid track record in this regard, so I don't suspect any surprises in that regard.

    Full press blast appears after the break.

    Computex 2015: OCZ Trion and Z-Drive 6000, 6300 SSDs Sighted

    Subject: Storage, Shows and Expos | June 2, 2015 - 11:18 PM |
    Tagged: Z-Drive 6300, Z-Drive 6000, Trion, ssd, pcie, OCZ Technology, ocz, NVMe, computex 2015, computex

    OCZ is showing off some new goodies at Computex 2015 in the form of a completely new SSD model – the Trion:

    Trion Pic.jpg

    The Trion is based on an in-house Toshiba ‘Alishan’ controller – the first internal design from that company. Since it is sourced from within Toshiba, the new SSD controller is to be tuned for consumer workloads and should employ lower power states than prior OCZ / Indilinx SSD controllers, as well as Toshiba’s own proprietary QSBC (Quadruple Swing-By Code) error correction technology, which should squeeze a bit more usable life out of the A19nm TLC flash. This is what QSBC looks like compared to competing BCH and LDPC technologies:

    QSBC.png

    We suspect Toshiba dialed back the algorithm a bit for client usage, but it should still be far superior to BCH. We don’t have many more details as the Trion has not yet been officially launched, but we do have this shot of a round of benchmark results from a pre-production 960GB model:

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    From what we can see, it appears to be a good performer (by modern SATA 6Gb/sec SSD standards), but we naturally can't tell anything for sure until we get samples in for local testing, as we have no idea of the state of preconditioning of the Trion in those tests.

    Also on display were the recently launched Z-Drive 6000 and 6300 Series parts:

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    ZDrive 6300 pic1.jpg

    These are OCZ’s enterprise-grade NVMe devices, available in 800GB, 1.6TB, and 3.2TB. The 6000 series is a 2.5” 15mm SFF-8639 device aimed at lighter workloads with a rating of 1 Drive Write Per Day (DWPD) over a 5-year period, while the 6300 series brings that figure up to 3 DWPD and offers an HHHL PCIe card as an optional form factor. The higher writes per day are facilitated by the move to A19nm eMLC flash.

    We’ll be keeping a close eye on these new developments from OCZ and we are eager to get these in the shop for some thorough testing!

    Press blast for the Trion and Z-Drive 6300 Series after the break!