Subject: Mobile
Manufacturer: Calyx

Introduction: Improving Portable Sound

The Calyx PaT is very small USB DAC and headphone amp that can be used with PCs and mobile devices, offering the possibility of better sound from just about any digital source. So how does it sound? Let’s find out!

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The PaT is a very interesting little device, to be sure. It rather resembles a large domino and weighs less than 1 ounce thanks to an ultra-light aluminum construction. It requires no battery or power source other than its micro USB connection, yet it provides sufficient power (0.8 V output) for in-ear monitors and efficient headphones through its 3.5mm headphone jack. Inside is a proprietary mix of DAC and amplifier circuitry, and like other products produced by Calyx, a Korean company with little presence in the United States, there is the promise of a dedication to great sound. Did Calyx pull it off with the diminutive PaT?

Improving Portable Sound

Outboard DACs and headphone amplifiers for computers and mobile devices are nothing new, with recent products like AudioQuest’s Dragonfly a prime example in the portable USB DAC market (though it offers no mobile support). When I first heard about the PaT during CES it was still in the prototype stage, but I was interested because of the Calyx name if nothing else, as I already owned the Calyx M DAP and had been quite honestly blown away by the sound.

So what need might I have for the interestingly-named PaT (pronounced "paat", meaning "bean" in reference to the small size), which is itself a DAC that requires another device to play music files? It wasn’t until I had the opportunity to speak with Calyx president Seungmok Yi during CES (via video chat as I couldn’t attend the show) that I started realize that this could be a compelling product, not just for the $99 price tag - a bargain for an audiophile product - but because of how versatile the PaT can be. You don't have to identify as an "audiophile" to appreciate the clearer and more detailed sound of a good DAC, especially when so many of us simply haven't heard one (especially on mobile devices).

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Continue reading our review of the Calyx PaT USB DAC and headphone amp!!

Checking out the high end model of the Asus Transformer Book T300 Chi

Subject: Mobile | May 25, 2015 - 01:27 PM |
Tagged: asus, transformer book, T300 Chi

The ASUS Transformer Book T300 Chi comes in a number of models, with the base mode running just under $700.  The Tech Report had a chance to review the higher end model which is more expensive and harder to find.  This particular model sports a 2.9GHz Broadwell based Core M 5Y71, 8GB DDR3-1600 and an internal 128GB internal SanDisk iSSD.  The 12.5" IPS 2560x1440 screen is common to all models, as is WiFi connectivity and Windows 8.1, 64-bit.  The keyboard portion of this Transformer Book is more of a screen stand than a dock as it uses Bluetooth to connect to the tablet as opposed to a physical interface, magnets keep the tablet in place when you are docked.  Check out how well it performs in The Tech Report's full review.

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"Asus' Transformer Book T300 Chi combines Intel's Core M processor with a 12.5" high-PPI display. The tablet half of this detachable 2-in-1 is thinner than the iPad Air, and it's backed by a keyboard dock that attaches with neodymium magnets. Read on to see what the T300 Chi is like as a tablet and notebook."

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Just Delivered: Lenovo Lavie-Z Lightweight Laptop

Subject: General Tech, Mobile | May 22, 2015 - 03:34 PM |
Tagged: ultrabook, Lenovo, lavie-z, Intel, i7-5500U, Broadwell

After seeing it at CES this January, one our most anticipated products became the Lenovo Lavie-Z laptop. Born out of a partnership between NEC and Lenovo, the Lavie-Z promises to be the world's lightest laptop.

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Our old-school postage scale doesn't have the accuracy to reach the 1.87lb that Lenovo clocks the Lavie-Z in at

Even after using the machine breiefly at CES, it is difficult to put into words what picking up a sub-2lb laptop is really like. Even after using the machine off and on today, it still feels like it's not a real machine. Lenovo and NEC have been able to accomplish this weight shedding through the use of a Lithium-Magnisum composite for the external housing of the machine, which seems durable, yet is incredibly light.

 

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This may be a lightweight machine, but the specifications aren't compromised over other ultrabooks. The Lavie-Z is only listed in one configuration on Lenovo's site currently, but it's a high end one. A Broadwell Intel i7-5500U dual core processor, 8GB of RAM, a 2560x1440 IGZO display, 256GB SATA M.2 Samsung SSD, and Intel 802.11AC wireless make up this machine. At $1500 for this configuration, there doesn't seem to be much of a markup over other i7-equipped ultrabooks.

We'll of course put the Lavie-Z through our normal paces including performance and battery life, and we certainly hope they live up to the striking first impressions of this laptop.

Stay tuned for our full review in the coming weeks!

ASUS Announces the ZenFone 2 Powered by Quad-Core Intel Atom

Subject: Mobile | May 18, 2015 - 02:00 PM |
Tagged: ZenFone 2, smartphones, intel atom, atom z3580, asus

ZenFone 2 is the new flagship smartphone from ASUS ZenFone, and features a new design powered by an Intel Atom Z3580 (Moorefield) processor with a massive 4GB of RAM.

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The phone has a 5.5-inch 1080p IPS display with 403 PPI for crisp scaling, and the “Ergonomic Arc” design includes a volume-control key on the rear of the phone “within easy reach of the user's index finger”, with a curved profile that tapers to a 0.15 inch at the edges.

The camera also features a 13 MP PixelMaster camera with a f/2.0 aperture and claimed “zero shutter-lag”. The battery weighs in at 3000mAh and features “BoostMaster” fast-charge technology that sounds similar to Qualcomm’s Quick Charge 2.0 standard.

But one of the most attractive features will be price, as ASUS will be selling these online through their retail channels as affordable unlocked smartphones:

  • 2GB / 16GB storage / Atom 3560 - $199
  • 4GB / 64GB storage / Atom 3580 / QuickCharger - $299

Here's look at the specifications:

  • CPU: Intel Quad-Core 64-bit Atom Z3580 @ 2.3GHz (Min Clock 333MHz, Max Clock 2333MHz)
  • GPU: PowerVR Series 6 G6430 with OpenGL 3.0 Support (Min Clock 457MHz, Max Clock 533MHz)
  • Display: 5.5in IPS, 1920x1080 resolution (403 PPI), Corning Gorilla Glass 3 with Anti-Fingerprint Coating
  • Memory: 4GB 800 MHz LPDDR3
  • Storage: 64GB eMMC
  • SIM: Support Dual active micro-SIM
  • Micro-SD slot: SDXC support up to 128GB
  • Modem: Intel XMM7260 LTE-Advanced
    • FDD LTE 1/2/3/4/5/7/8/9/177/18/19/20/28/29
    • TDD LTE 38/39/40/41
    • WCDMA 850/900/1900
    • TD-SCDMA 1900/2100
    • EDGE/GPRS/GSM 850/900/1800/1900
  • Wireless: WiFi 802.11a/b/g/n/ac
  • Rear Camera: 13MP, aperture f/2.0, sensor size 1/3.2 inch
  • Front Camera: 5MP
  • Maximum Video Resolution: 1080p/30
  • Battery: 3000 mAh Lithium-Polymer (11.4 Wh), Boostmaster Fast-Charging
  • Colors: Glacier Gray, Osmium Black, Glamour Red, Sheer Gold
  • Dimensions: 152.5 mm x 77.2 mm x 10.9-3.9 mm (6 x 3.04 x 0.43-.15 inches)
  • Weight: 170g

PR after the break.

Source: ASUS

ASUS Announces QHD ZenBook UX305, 4K UX501 Notebook

Subject: Mobile | May 18, 2015 - 02:00 PM |
Tagged: zenbook pro, zenbook, UX501, UX305, QHD+, notebooks, ips, asus, 4k, 2560x1440

ASUS has annouced a new QHD+ version of the affordable ZenBook UX305 notebook as well as the new ZenBook Pro UX501.

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The ZenBook UX305 was released as a disruptive notebook with specs far above its $699 price tag, and this new version goes far beyond the 1920x1080 screen resolution of the original. This new QHD+ (3200x1800) panel is IPS just like the original, but with this ultra-high resolution it boasts 276 PPI for either incredibly sharp, or incredibly tiny text depending on how well your application scales.

The new ZenBook Pro UX501 takes resolution a step further with a 4K/UHD 3820x2160 IPS panel and a powerful quad-core Intel Core i7-4720HQ processor with 16GB of RAM at its disposal. NVIDIA GeForce GTX 960M graphics power this 15.6-inch, 282 PPI UHD panel, and naturally 4x PCIe storage is available as well.

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More information and specs are available in the full PR for both notebooks after the break.

Source: ASUS

NVIDIA SHIELD and SHIELD Pro Show up on Amazon

Subject: Mobile | May 16, 2015 - 01:00 PM |
Tagged: Tegra X1, tegra, shield pro, shield console, shield, nvidia

UPDATE: Whoops! It appears that Amazon took the listing down... No surprise there. I'm sure we'll be seeing them again VERY SOON. :)

Looks like the release of the new NVIDIA SHIELD console device, first revealed back at GDC in March, is nearly here. A listing for "NVIDIA SHIELD" as well as the new "NVIDIA SHIELD Pro" showed up on Amazon.com today.

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Though we don't know what the difference between the SHIELD and SHIELD Pro are officially, according to Amazon at least, the difference appears to be the internal storage. The Pro model will ship with 500GB of internal storage, the non-Pro model will only have 16GB. You'll have to get an SD Card for more storage on the base model if you plan on doing anything other than streaming games through NVIDIA GRID it seems.

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No pricing is listed yet and there is no release date on the Amazon pages either, but we have always been told this was to be a May or June on-sale date. Both models of the NVIDIA SHIELD will include an HDMI cable, a micro-USB cable and a SHIELD Controller. If you want the remote or stand, you're going to have to pay out a bit more.

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For those of you that missed out on the original SHIELD announcement from March, here is a quick table detailing the specs, as we knew them at that time. NVIDIA's own Tegra X1 SoC featuring 256 Maxwell GPU cores powers this device using the Android TV operating system, promising 4K video playback, the best performing Android gaming experience and NVIDIA GRID streaming games.

  NVIDIA SHIELD Specifications
Processor NVIDIA® Tegra® X1 processor with 256-core Maxwell™ GPU with 3GB RAM
Video Features 4K Ultra-HD Ready with 4K playback and capture up to 60 fps (VP9, H265, H264)
Audio 7.1 and 5.1 surround sound pass through over HDMI
High-resolution audio playback up to 24-bit/192kHz over HDMI and USB
High-resolution audio upsample to 24-bit/192hHz over USB
Storage 16 GB
Wireless 802.11ac 2x2 MIMO 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz Wi-Fi
Bluetooth 4.1/BLE
Interfaces Gigabit Ethernet
HDMI 2.0
Two USB 3.0 (Type A)
Micro-USB 2.0
MicroSD slot (supports 128GB cards)
IR Receiver (compatible with Logitech Harmony)
Gaming Features NVIDIA GRID™ streaming service
NVIDIA GameStream™
SW Updates SHIELD software upgrades directly from NVIDIA
Power 40W power adapter
Weight and Size Weight: 23oz / 654g
Height: 5.1in / 130mm
Width: 8.3in / 210mm
Depth: 1.0in / 25mm
OS Android TV™, Google Cast™ Ready
Bundled Apps PLEX
In the box NVIDIA SHIELD
NVIDIA SHIELD controller
HDMI cable (High Speed), USB cable (Micro-USB to USB)
Power adapter (Includes plugs for North America, Europe, UK)
Requirements TV with HDMI input, Internet access
Options SHIELD controller, SHIELD remove, SHIELD stand

 

Source: Amazon.com

What Makes a Mobile GPU Tick? Interview with ARM's Jem Davies

Subject: Mobile | May 15, 2015 - 01:56 PM |
Tagged: video, mali, jem davies, interview, arm

Have you ever wondered how a mobile GPU is born? Or how the architecture of a mobile GPU like ARM Mali differs from the technology in your discrete PC graphics card? Perhaps you just want to know if ideas like HBM (high bandwidth memory) are going to find their way into the mobile ecosystem any time soon?

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Josh and I sat down (virtually) with ARM's VP of Technology and Fellow, Jem Davies,  to answer these questions and quite a bit more. The resulting interview will shed light on the design process of a mobile GPU, how you get the most out of an SoC that measures power by the milliwatt, what the world of mobile benchmarking needs to do to clean up its act and quite a bit more. 

You'd be hard pressed to find a better way to spend the next hour of your day as you will without a doubt walk away more informed about the world of smartphones, tablets and GPUs.

The Core M powered Dell Venue 11 Pro 7140 Convertible

Subject: Mobile | May 1, 2015 - 02:26 PM |
Tagged: dell, Venue 11 Pro 7140, convertible tablet, Windows 8.1

The new Dell Venue 11 Pro is a tablet with a 10.8" touchscreen with 10 point capacitive touch displaying at a 1080p resolution powered by the Intel HD5300 present on the CoreM 5Y71 processor.  That processor has a base frequency of 1.2GHz and a much more impressive maximum boost of 2.9GHz, offering both power savings and powerful performance depending on the needs of the application you are using.  8GB of DDR3-1600MHz will help you use many applications and the 256GB SSD is a nice touch for those who prefer to have most of their software and data stored locally. 

Check out the camera, ports and other specifics in Mad Shrimps review, they didn't review the dock/keyboard but there are two models available; the less expensive Slim model and the Mobile version.

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"If you are looking for a professional looking convertible with the latest available low power consumption Intel Core M processor which is paired with 8GB of RAM, 256GB SSD and comes with a fully-fledged Windows 8.1 Pro operating system, then look no further, your answer is here!"

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Source: Mad Shrimps

Living on the Edge

Subject: Mobile | April 23, 2015 - 02:24 PM |
Tagged: Samsung, Galaxy S6 Edge, lollipop

The physical difference between the Galaxy S6 and the Galaxy S6 Edge are quite visible, but does the different body justify the price difference?  The curved screen adds a bit of screen real estate and provides improved view angles compared to the base model but similar to the previous Galaxy Note Edge, there are not many apps designed to take advantage of the curve.  The phone is 7mm thick and weighs slightly less than the base S6 at 132g, with a similar battery and the same TouchWiz overlay on top of Android Lollipop.  You can check out what The Inquirer thought of Samsung's new premium phone here if you are considering purchasing the S6 Edge.

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"THE GALAXY S6 EDGE will be seen by many as an expensive gimmick given that it's over £100 more expensive than the regular Galaxy S6, while others will see it as Samsung pushing the boundaries of design, and trumping its rivals by bringing something new to the smartphone market."

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Source: The Inquirer
Author:
Subject: Systems, Mobile
Manufacturer: Intel

Specifications

When I first was handed the Intel Compute Stick product at CES back in January, my mind began to race with a lot of questions. The first set were centered around the capabilities of the device itself: where could it be used, how much performance could Intel pack into it and just how many users would be interested in a product like this? Another set of questions was much more philosophical in nature: why was Intel going in this direction, does this mean an end for the emphasis on high performance componentry from Intel and who comes up with these darned part numbers?

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I have since settled my mind on the issues surrounding Intel’s purpose with the Compute Stick and began to dive into the product itself. On the surface the Intel Compute Stick is a product entering late into a potentially crowded market. We already have devices like the Roku, Google Chromecast, the Apple TV, and even the Amazon Fire TV Stick. All of those devices share some of the targets and goals of the Compute Stick, but the one area where Intel’s product really stands out is flexibility. The Roku has the most pre-built applications and “channels” for a streaming media box. The Chromecast is dirt cheap at just $30 or so. Even Amazon’s Fire TV Stick is clearly the best choice for streaming Amazon’s own multimedia services. But the Intel Compute Stick can do all of those things – in addition to operating as a standalone PC with Windows or Linux. Anything you can do I can do better…

But it’s not a product without a few flaws, most of which revolve around the status of the current operating system designs for TVs and larger displays. Performance obviously isn’t peeling the paint off any walls, as you would expect. But I still think at for $150 with a full copy of Windows 8.1 with Bing, the Intel Compute Stick is going to find more fans that you might have first expected.

Continue reading our review of the Intel Compute Stick!!