AMD Unveils New Gamer Memory: MOAR RAMDISK!

Subject: Memory | May 8, 2013 - 12:01 AM |
Tagged: radeon ramdisk, radeon, memory, amd, 4GB, 2133, 1.65v

 

AMD makes memory!  Ok, they likely contract out memory.  Then they brand it!  Then they throw in some software to make RAMDisks out of all that memory that you are not using.  Let us face it; AMD is not particularly doing anything new here with memory.  It is very much a commodity market that is completely saturated with quality parts from multiple manufacturers.

So why is AMD doing it?  Well, I guess part of it is simply brand recognition and potentially another source of income to help pad the bottom line.  They will not sell these parts for a loss, and they will have buyers with the diehard AMD fans.  Tim covered the previous release of AMD memory pretty well, and he looked at the performance results of the free RAMDisk software that AMD bundled with the DIMMs.  It does exactly what it is supposed to, but of course it takes portions of memory away.  When dealing with upwards of 16 GB of memory for a desktop computer, sacrificing half of that is really not that big a deal unless heavy duty image and video editing are required.

amd_mem_01.jpg

*Tombraider not included with Radeon Memory.  Radeon RAMDisk instead!

Today AMD is announcing a new memory product and a new bundled version of the RAMDisk software.  The top end SKU is now the AMD Radeon RG2133 DDR-3 modules.  It comes in a package of up to 4 x 4GB DIMMS and carries a CAS latency of 10 with the voltage at a reasonable 1.65v.  These modules are programmed with both the Intel based XMP and the AMD based AMP (MP stands for Memory Profiles… if that wasn’t entirely obvious).  The modules themselves are reasonable in terms of size (they will fit in any board, even with larger heatsinks on the CPU).  AMD claims that they are all high quality parts, which again is not entirely surprising since I do not know of anyone who advertises that their DIMMS feature only the most mediocre memory modules available.

amd_mem_02.jpg

Faster memory is faster, water is wet, and Ken still needs a girlfriend.

AMD goes on to claim that faster memory does improve overall system performance.  Furthermore AMD has revealed that UV light is in fact a cancer causing agent, Cocoa Puffs will turn any milk brown, and passing gas in church will rarely be commented upon (unless it is truly rank or you start calling yourself “Legion”).  Many graphs were presented that essentially showed an overclocked APU with this memory will outperform a non-overclocked APU with DDR-3 1600 units.  Truly eye opening, to say the least.

amd_mem_03.jpg

How much RAMDisk can any one man take?  AMD wants to know!

The one big piece of the pie that we have yet to talk about is the enhanced version of Radeon RAMDisk (is Farva naming these things?).  This particular version can carve out up to 64 GB of memory for a RAMDisk!  I can tell you this now, me and my 8 GB of installed memory will get a LOT of mileage out of this one!  I can only imagine the product meeting.  “Hey, I’ve got a great idea!  We can give them up to 64 GB of RAMDisk!”  While another person replies, “How do you propose getting people above 64 GB, much less 32 GB of memory on a consumer level product…?”  After much hand wringing and mumbling someone comes up with, “I know!  They can span it across two motherboards!  That way they have to buy an extra motherboard AND a CPU!  Think of our attach rate!”  And there was much rejoicing.

amd_mem_04.jpg

Inconceivable!!!

So yes, more memory that goes faster is better.  Radeon RAMDisk is not just a comic superhero, it can improve overall system performance.  Combine the two and we have AMD Radeon Memory RG2133 with 64 GB of RAMDisk.  Considering that the top SKU will feature 4 x 4GB DIMMS, a user only needs to buy four kits and four motherboards and processors to get a 64GB RAMDisk.  Better throw in another CPU and motherboard so a user can at least have 16GB of memory available as, you know, memory.

Update and Clarification

Perhaps my tone was a bit too sarcastic, but I just am not seeing the value here.  Apparently (and I was not given this info before hand) the 4 x 4 GB kits with the 64 GB RAMDisk will retail at $155.  Taking a quick look at Newegg I see that a user can buy quite a few different 2 x 8 GB 2133 kits anywhere from $139 to $145 with similar or better latencies/voltages.  Around $155 users will get better latencies and voltages down to 1.5v.  For 4 x 4GB kits we again see prices start at the $139 mark, but there are a significant number of other kits with again better voltages and latencies from $144 through $155.

Users can also get the free version of the Radeon RAMDisk that will utilize up to 4GB of space.  There are multiple other software kits for not a whole lot of money (less than $10) that will provide you up to 16 GB of RAMDisk.  I just find the whole kit to be comparable to what is currently out there.  Offering a 64 GB RAMDisk for use with 16 GB of total system memory just seems to be really silly.  The only way that could possibly be interesting would be if you could allocate 8 GB of that onto RAM and the other 56 GB onto a fast SSD.  I do not believe that to be the case with this software, but I would love to be proved wrong.

Source: AMD

Kingston's Beast-ly new HyperX kit

Subject: Memory | April 15, 2013 - 04:44 PM |
Tagged: kingston, hyperX beast, DDR3-2400

At a speed of DDR3-2400 timings of 11-13-13-30 @ 2T are more than impressive and hint at the overclocking potential of these DIMMs.  They also come with two XPM settings, the one just mentioned which runs at 1.65V and a 2133 MHz mode which runs at 1.6V and similar timings.  Once TechPowerUp got their hands on the DIMMs they managed to hit 2634 MHz and tighten up the Command Rate to 1T.  Keep in mind those pretty heatspreaders may make your life difficult if your motherboard is crowded around the socket and your heatsink doesn't have much clearance.  That exact kit does not appear at NewEgg but a very similar 16GB kit does.

TPU_contents.jpg

"A rabid animal hungry for food, the Kingston HyperX Beast stampedes into the overclocking scene, ripping through our benchmarks like no other. Clocked in at 2400 MHz out of the box, these beasts are ready to take on whatever you want to feed them."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Source: TechPowerUp

Corsair Unleashes Vengeance Extreme, the World's Fastest Rated PC Memory Kits

Subject: Memory | March 14, 2013 - 04:13 PM |
Tagged: DDR3-3000, corsair, Vengeance Extreme, dual channel

Corsair is taking Xtreme Memory Profiles to the next level with an extremely limited release of DDR3-3000 2x4GB kits, for the low, low price of $750.  They list two motherboard with BIOSes capable of hitting that speed and perhaps higher for those willing to move to exotic cooling solutions using the included cooler.  The 1.65V is high but not insane, possibly due to the timings of 12-14-14-36 but you will probably need to up the power if you are intending on pushing these DIMMs past 3GHz.  You can try to pick them up directly from Corsair.

VENG_EXTREME_R_F.png

FREMONT, California — March 14, 2013 — Corsair, a worldwide designer and supplier of high-performance components to the PC hardware market, today announced new Vengeance Extreme 8GB dual-channel DDR3 memory kits rated at 3000MHz, the world's fastest rated production PC memory kits. Fitted with low profile "racing red" heat spreaders, the new 2x4GB memory kits operate at 3000MHz air-cooled, with latency settings of 12-14-14-36, at 1.65V. A Kingpin Cooling memory cooler is included for overclockers who want to use LN2 (liquid nitrogen) to reach memory speeds well beyond 3000MHz.

The extreme-speed 3000MHz rating of the Vengeance Extreme memory kits is the result of a rigorous internal four-stage hand-screening process performed by Corsair engineers. This process is passed by fewer than one in 50 memory ICs. Performance qualification is performed on select Intel Z77 based motherboards, including the ASUS P8Z77-I DELUXE and ASRock Z77 OC Formula. To hit their rated speeds, the modules require a 3rd Generation Intel Core unlocked processor with an Integrated Memory Controller capable of running 3000MHz.

“We are focused on helping enthusiasts and overclockers push the boundaries of PC performance," said Thi La, Senior VP and GM of Memory and Enthusiast Component Products at Corsair. “Our engineering team's hard work has led to new performance optimization techniques for memory, which we are pleased to debut in our new Vengeance Extreme memory."

Pricing and Availability
The Vengeance Extreme 3000MHz 8GB memory kits are priced at $749.99 USD and will be available exclusively from Corsair.com in March. Quantities of these hand-built modules will be extremely limited.

Source: Corsair

Celebrate 10 years of Kingston with 16GB of DDR3-2400

Subject: Memory | March 12, 2013 - 05:30 PM |
Tagged: kingston, hyperx, HyperX Genesis 10th Anniversary Special Edition, DDR3-2400

Kingston has put together a 16GB, 4DIMM quad (or dual) channel DDR-2400 kit with timings of 11-13-13-30 available for $160.  They've designed compact heat spreaders for this kit so even with the tight confines of the CPU socket which have become common today you should be able to fit these in your system without much difficulty.  From TechPowerUp's testing these DIMMs seem to be running all out at stock speeds, even upping the voltage only allowed them a stable 2468MHz perhaps not a problem on boards which cannot break 2400MHz in the BIOS.  They do mention that the Anniversary Special Editions have limited availability so if their review tempts you, purchase this kit as soon as you can.

TPU_box_front.jpg

"To commemorate the 10th anniversary of the HyperX brand, Kinston has released a limited edition line up called the HyperX Genesis 10th Anniversary Special Edition. We take a look at the top-end 16 GB 2400 MHz CL11 kit, a blazing fast kit with performance to match."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Source: TechPowerUp

NVDIMM: Nonvolatile... Not NVIDIA

Subject: General Tech, Memory, Systems | February 10, 2013 - 03:44 AM |
Tagged: NVDIMM, micron, IMFT NAND, imft

So a RAM chip, a NAND module, and an “ultracapacitor” walk into stick...

This week Micron released a press blast for technology called, “NVDIMM”. The goal is to create memory modules which perform as quickly as DRAM but can persist without power. At this point you could probably guess the acronym: Nonvolatile Dual In-line Memory Module. It has been around for a few years now, but it is in the news now so let's chat about it.

I often like to play the game, “Was this named by an engineer or a marketer?” You can typically tell who was responsible for naming something by gauging how literally it breaks down into a simple meaning versus not having any apparent meaning at all. A good example of an engineer name is UHF, which breaks down into ultra-high frequency because it's higher than VHF, very-high frequency. A good example of a marketing name would be something like “Centrino”, which sounds like the biggest little penny-slot machine in the world. I would quite comfortable guessing that NVDIMM was named by an engineer.

NVDIMM.jpg

This is AgigA Tech's module, who provides the capacitors for Micron and their NVDIMMs.

The actual makeup of NVDIMMs is quite sensible: DIMMs are fast but die when the power goes out. You could prevent the power from going out but it takes quite a lot of battery life to keep a computer online for extended periods of time. NAND Flash is quite slow, relative to DIMMs, in normal operation but can persist without power for very long periods of time. Also, modern-day capacitors are efficient and durable enough to keep DIMMs powered for long enough to be copied to flash memory.

As such, if the power goes out: memory is dumped to flash on the same chip. When power is restored, DIMMs get reloaded and continue on their merry way.

According to the Micron press release, the first NVDIMM was demonstrated last November at SC12. That module contained twice as much NAND as it did DIMM memory: 8GB of Flash for 4GB of RAM. Micron did not specify why they required having that much extra Flash memory although my gut instinct is to compensate for write wearing problems. A two-fold increase to offset NAND that had just one too many write operations seems like quite a lot compared to consumer drives. That said, SSDs do not have to weather half of their whole capacity being written to each time the computer shuts down.

Who knows, double-provisioning might even be too little in practice.

Source: Micron

G.Skill would like to know if you can handle 32GB of DDR3-2400

Subject: Memory | February 7, 2013 - 07:13 PM |
Tagged: G.Skill Trident X, DDR3-2400, 32GB, dual channel

At $280 the 32GB kit of DDR3-2400 RAM from G.Skill costs more than an SSD but if you consider what you would have paid for 4GB of DDR3 when it first hit the market you can't argue that the price of a kit like this has fallen drastically.  The timings are not even particularly loose for DIMMs of this speed, 10-12-12-31 @ 2T is not too shabby, though Neoseeker didn't have much luck tightening them as they couldn't get to the fully rated speed of the DIMMs due to their motherboard not being able to support that speed.  Keep note of that, many motherboards simply do not have 2400MHz as a choice in the BIOS and many CPUs won't be able to keep these DIMMs fully active.  You could always opt for using a goodly chunk of the memory as a RAM drive, no matter what speed your BIOS supports.  Check the full review here.

NS_32gbgskill.png

"Today I will be looking at G. Skill's Trident X DDR3 2400MHz 32GB quad channel memory kit. With their goal of extreme overclocking performance, G. Skill uses the highest quality memory IC's available when manufacturing their memory. To ensure trouble-free operation, their memory undergoes rigorous testing to verify their craftsmanship and performance."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Source: Neoseeker

Squeeze a little more out of your Ultrabook with 1.35V RAM?

Subject: Memory | January 24, 2013 - 01:07 PM |
Tagged: patriot, PC3-12800, 8gb, LoVo, sodimm, 1.35V, ultrabook

Over at Tweaktown is a review of an upgrade for Ultrabooks, Patriot's 1.35V, 8GB DDR3-1600MHz at $45 for a single SODIMM.  The idea is that not only do you get a decent sized pool of RAM but because it sips 10% less power than a standard SODIMM you might just get a bit more battery life.  They tested out the memory on a Lenovo ThinkPad W530 with a 6-cell battery, not the longest lasting of setups and saw about a 10% increase in battery life as you might have expected.  That did only translate to an extra 17 minutes but as the laptop in question was only good for 4.5 hours of life, you can expect better return from an Ultrabook with a longer battery life.

TT_5131_05_patriot_memory_for_ultrabook_pc3_12800_8gb_lovo_sodimm_review_full.jpg

"The big push in 2013 for mobile performance will be fought in battery life. Like every other market, if you want to get the best available you have to go to the aftermarket for premium components. The Patriot Memory for Ultrabooks will increase your notebook or ultrabook battery life, but just like everything premium, you have to pay a bit more."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Source: Tweaktown

Corsair Launches 'World's Fastest' USB 3.0 Flash Drives

Subject: Memory, Storage | January 8, 2013 - 09:00 AM |
Tagged:

Corsair has announced their new line of "Flash Voyager GT Turbo" flash drives that will blow the doors off of most USB drives on the market and might even give some SSD's a run for their money.

FVGT_TURBO_hero_B_closed.png

These USB 3.0 drives will be natively compatible with Windows, Mac OS X and Linux and backwards compatible with USB 2.0 ports.  With read speeds of up to 260 MB/s and write speeds of up to 235 MB/s, these drives should meet any high speed data transfer needs.

FVGT_TURBO_hero_B_open.png

The drives will come in three sizes, 32 GB, 64 GB and 128 GB, but that speed comes at a cost.  The 32 GB drive will have a suggested retail price of $49.99 (USD), the 64 GB will retail for $89.99, and the 128 GB drive will weigh in at a hefty $179.99 when released.

FVGT_TURBO_hero_A_closed.png

The drives are backed by a nice 5 year warranty and the drive itself looks fairly well made, but will the hefty price tag turn consumers off?  Only time will tell.

FVGT_TURBO_straight_open.png

Coverage of CES 2013 is brought to you by AMD!

PC Perspective's CES 2013 coverage is sponsored by AMD.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: Corsair

Crucial's 16GB Ballistix Tactical has a nice surprise

Subject: Memory | November 30, 2012 - 02:04 PM |
Tagged: crucial, Ballistix Tactical, 16GB, ddr3-1600

It is a nice change when a company understates the performance of their product instead of barely living up to their promises.  Such is the case with the dual channel Crucal Ballistix Tactical 1600MHz kit, at least the one that Funky Kit benchmarked.  They hit 2133MHz and kept the timings at 9-9-9-24 1T, not bad for DIMMs which are billed for 8-8-8-24 1T@ 1600MHz!  Even better these DIMMs are very low profile, so even on boards with the DIMM slots clustered around the CPU socket you won't be limited in your choice of oversized CPU coolers.  The full review is available here.

FJ_crucial16gb-sticks-overview.jpg

"This has been some fun memory to play with, it's ability to hit clocks 50% higher than stock is impressive. It's ability to hit 2133MHz with 9-9-9 timings at only 1.5v is quite impressive."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Source: Funky Kit

ADATA puts out the second version of their XPG Gaming RAM

Subject: Memory | November 20, 2012 - 07:44 PM |
Tagged: adata, DDR3-2400

For DDR3-2400 the Dual Channel ADATA XPG Gaming Series 8GB kit has decent timings @ 11-13-13-35.  Neoseeker's testing was not without problems however as Windows refused to boot at the full 2400MHz on their MSI Big Bang XPower II, instead they had to run at 2133MHz though the timings were tightened to 10.13.13.31 1T.  Performance fell in line with other similar kits at that speed, perhaps not at the top of the pack but certainly in the running.  They are out of stock at NewEgg, but you might be able to lay your hands on these fancy green DIMMs from another retailer.

NS_2_thumb.png

"ADATA hopes to join the ranks of the big boys in the gaming memory market with their XPG Gaming v2.0 series of memory kits. We review the DDR3-2400 8GB dual channel kit and put head to head against the likes of G.Skill's Ripjaws Z, Patriot's Viper III and the Corsair Dominator GT to see how well it can compete."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Source: Neoseeker