Computex 2014: ADATA Announces 2TB SandForce SF3700 Series PCIe and M.2 SSDs, DDR4 Memory

Subject: Memory, Storage | June 4, 2014 - 11:15 AM |
Tagged: ssd, solid state drive, pcie, pci-e ssd, memory, M.2, ddr4, computex 2014, computex, adata, 2tb ssd

ADATA has been showing off some upcoming products at Computex, and it's all about DRAM.

adata_logo.jpg

We'll begin with an upcoming line of PCIe Enterprise/Server SSDs powered by the SandForce SF3700-series controller. We've been waiting for products with the SF3700 controller since January, when ADATA showed a prototype board at CES, and ADATA is now showcasing the controller in the "SR1020" series drives.

image_9.jpeg

The first is a 2TB 2.5" drive, but the interface was not announced (and the sample on the floor appeared to be an empty shell).  The listed specs are performance up to 1800MB/s and 150K IOPS, with the drive powered by the SF-3739 controller.  Support for both AHCI and NVMe is also listed, along with the usual TRIM, NCQ, and SMART support.

image_12.jpeg

Another 2TB SSD was shown with exactly the same specs as the 2.5" version, but this one is built on the M.2 spec. The drive will connect via 4 lanes of Gen 2 PCI Express. Both drives in ADATA's SR1020 PCIe SSD lineup will be available in capacities from 240GB - 2TB, and retail pricing and availability is forthcoming.

image_7.jpeg

Continuing the DRAM theme, ADATA also showed new DDR4 modules in commodity and enthusiast flavors. Both of the registered DIMMs on display (an ultra-low profile DIMM was also shown) had standard DDR4 specs of 2133MHz at 1.2V, but ADATA also showed some performance DDR4 at their booth.

image_21.jpeg

A pair of XPG Z1 DDR4 modules in action

No pricing or availability just yet on these products.

Source: ADATA
Subject: Memory
Manufacturer: Kingston

Ultra-Speed RAM, APU-Style

In our review of the Kingston HyperX Predator 2666MHz kit, we discovered what those knowledgeable about Intel memory scaling already knew: for most applications, and specifically games, there is no significant advantage to increases in memory speed past the current 1600MHz DDR3 standard.  But this was only half of the story. What about memory scaling with an AMD processor, and specifically an APU? To find out, we put AMD’s top APU, the A10-7850K, to the test!

apu_components_1.jpg

Ready for some APU memory testing!

The APU

AMD has created a compelling option with their APU lineup, and the inclusion of powerful integrated graphics allows for interesting build options with lower power and space requirements, and even make building tiny mini-ITX systems for gaming realistic. It’s this graphical prowess compared to any other onboard solution that creates an interesting value proposition for any gamer looking at a new low-cost build. The newest Kaveri APU’s are getting a lot of attention and they beg the question, is a discrete graphics card really needed for gaming at reasonable settings?

Continue reading our article on using high speed DDR3 memory with AMD APUs!!

Shave another couple of watts off your Kabini system

Subject: Memory | April 9, 2014 - 06:54 PM |
Tagged: kingston, kingston hyper x, Genesis LoVo, 16GB, ddr3-1600

If you were impressed by the low wattage required to run the AMD AM1 Athlon 5350 and are thinking of building a low power system along the lines of the one Josh used in his review Kingston has a product to help you lower that total system voltage a little more.  HyperX Genesis LoVo uses only a mere 1.35V to power the 16GB DDR3-1600 CL9 kit and their low profile helps if you are building a small sized system.  Performance at stock speeds is quite decent, with the possibility of overclocking to add more speed if you desire but these DIMMs are more about power savings than raw power.  Check out the full review at Funky Kit.

Kingston_LoVo_pht2.jpg

"Even though higher clocked RAM is great for overclocking and gaming for most computer users, memory at lower clocks is good enough for the general tasks they perform daily. For those users, memory speed is usually less important than capacity so today we wish to present something more regular in the memory's world what is Kingston HyperX Genesis LoVo 16GB DDR3-1600 CL9. As probably some readers already noticed, we can't really call it regular memory as Kingston specified it to run at low voltage of 1.35V ... and it's green like most eco-friendly products."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Source: Funky Kit

SK Hynix Develops 128GB Stick of DDR4 RAM

Subject: General Tech, Memory | April 8, 2014 - 02:03 AM |
Tagged: Hynix, ddr4

... I'll take two.

SK Hynix, one of the leading producers of RAM modules, announced a single stick of DDR4 with 128GB capacity. While this is intended for the server room, I hope that we will see workstation components attempt to be compatible in the near future. It is difficult to find a board that can support more than 64GB at all, let alone twice that, per stick.

ram.jpg

As for the typical desktop users? Let's face it, this is overkill, eight times over, generously, per stick. Web browsers are beginning to ring up the memory usage as more and more tabs are loaded simultaneously but, otherwise, there is little use for it for them.

But for those of us who are not them, this could be awesome. It is still unclear how much memory a Haswell-EX motherboard, running on an Intel X99 chipset, will support. I can assume that this stick will not be compatible... but we can always hope, right?

Source: SK Hynix
Subject: Memory
Manufacturer: Kingston

So Many MHz, So Little Time...

If you've looked at memory for your system lately you've likely noticed a couple of things. First, memory prices have held steady for the past few months, but are still nearly double what they were a little over a year ago. Second, now that DDR3 has been a mature standard for years, there is a vast selection of RAM from many vendors, all with nearly identical specs. The standard has settled at 1600MHz for DDR3, and most desktop memory is programmed for this speed. Granted, many modules run at overclocked speeds, and there are some out there with pretty outlandish numbers, too - and it’s one of those kits that we take a look at today.

HyperX_0.jpg

Hardly subtle, the Kingston HyperX 'Predator' dual channel kit for review today is clocked at a ridiculous 1066MHz OVER the 1600MHz standard. That's right, this is 2666MHz memory! It seems like such a big jump would have to provide increased system performance across the board, and that's exactly what we're going to find out.

We all want to get the most out of any component, and finding the best option at a given price is part of planning any new build or upgrade. While every core part is sold at a particular speed, and most can be overclocked, there are still some qualifying factors that make selecting the fastest part for your budget a little more complicated. Speed isn't based on MHz alone – as with processors, where it often comes down to number of cores, how many instructions per clock cycle a given CPU can churn out, etc.

Continue reading our review of the Kingston HyperX Predator 2666 MHz DDR3 memory kit!!

Corsair Quantifies the Benefits of Overclocking

Subject: Editorial, General Tech, Graphics Cards, Processors, Memory, Systems | January 20, 2014 - 02:40 AM |
Tagged: corsair, overclocking

I rarely overclock anything and this is for three main reasons. The first is that I have had an unreasonably bad time with computer parts failing on their own. I did not want to tempt fate. The second was that I focused on optimizing the operating system and its running services. This was mostly important during the Windows 98, Windows XP, and Windows Vista eras. The third is that I did not find overclocking valuable enough for the performance you regained.

A game that is too hefty to run is probably not an overclock away from working.

intelupgrade.jpg

Thankfully this never took off...

Today, overclocking is easier and safer than ever with parts that basically do it automatically and back off, on their own, if thermals are too aggressive. Several components are also much less locked down than they have been. (Has anyone, to this day, hacked the locked Barton cores?) It should not be too hard to find a SKU which encourages the enthusiast to tweak some knobs.

But how much of an increase will you see? Corsair has been blogging about using their components (along with an Intel processor, Gigabyte motherboard, and eVGA graphics card because they obviously do not make those) to overclock. The cool part is they break down performance gains in terms of raising the frequencies for just the CPU, just the GPU, just the RAM, or all of the above together. This breakdown shows how each of the three categories contribute to the whole. While none of the overclocks are dramatic, Corsair is probably proud of the 5% jump in Cinebench OpenGL performance just by overclocking the RAM from 1600 MHz to 1866 MHz without touching the CPU or GPU.

It is definitely worth a look.

Source: Corsair

Roccat's trio of peripherals for the distinguished mouser

Subject: Memory | January 7, 2014 - 03:49 PM |
Tagged: roccat, gaming mat, gaming mouse, mouse caddy

Up for review at Hardware Asylum is a trio of Roccat products, the Kone Pure Optical gaming mouse, the Hiro mousepad and the Apuri mouse cord caddy.  The cord caddy is similar to other products we've seen in the past but the inclusion of powered USB 2.0 ports is an nice addition to an otherwise superfluous peripheral.  The mousepad is made of stain resistant silicone and measures 350 x 250 x 2.5mm which should fit on most desks.  The Kone mouse sports a 4000 DPI Pro-Optic sensor, 576kB on-board memory for macros as well as the ability for you to utilize your keyboard in conjunction with the mouse thanks to the rather comprehensive software suite.

mouse_bundle_combined.jpg

"All paired together, the Kone Pure Optical, Apuri and Hiro make a nice setup that provides a lot of utility and versatility inside and out of games, and all without breaking the bank. This trio can be acquired for the cost of just a high grade laser mouse alone, and it will perform and feel great in many gaming and working environments."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

AnandTech Benchmarks Memory for Servers

Subject: General Tech, Memory | January 1, 2014 - 03:37 AM |
Tagged: RDIMM, ram, LRDIMM

In all honesty, outside of on-die graphics solutions, memory speed and latency are often neglected. My only requirements for RAM beyond the recommended specs for my motherboard and processor has been a heat spreader of some sort (and that is just because I have bad luck with several DOAs on unshielded RAM which I assume was handling problems).

But this story is for the enterprise users.

dom_pt_hero_c_2800_2_1_1_1_1.png

Johan De Gelas of AnandTech decided to test a few different configurations of RAM including both RDIMM and LRDIMM modules. LRDIMMs are significantly more expensive than the cheaper RIMM modules but, especially if you could reduce server count (and active licenses of software running on them) they wanted to investigate whether it could be cheaper overall. This would not be the case if software is completely CPU-limited... but, again, when is memory the limiting factor?

That is where the benchmarks come in. Among the handful of measurements performed, they simulated thousands of users accessing a CDN with between one-to-three-quarters of a terabyte of memory. In both cases, 768GB of LRDIMM memory had significantly higher throughput and significantly lower latency.

As always, check out the review if you are interested.

Source: Anandtech

Revisiting ultra fast DDR3; is it worth the price yet?

Subject: Memory | November 18, 2013 - 06:33 PM |
Tagged: DDR3-2400, patriot, Viper 3, Black Mamba, 16GB

Patriot's Viper 3 Black Mamba PC3-19200 16GB kit will set you back $225 to purchase which is a large premium over DDR3-1600.  Base timings of 11-11-11-28 are not that much higher than DDR3 which might help these DIMMs live up to their premium pricing as will Intel's XMP 1.3 memory profile.  To find out how it compares to other 2400MHz RAM as well as slower kits you can head over to Neoseeker to read their full review as well as see what kind of overclock they managed to attain.

2_.png

"Today we review Patriot's Viper 3 series Black Mamba PC3-19200 16B dual channel memory kit featuring low-profile heatspreaders and an Intel XMP profile."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Source: Neoseeker

Antec's High Current Pro 850W Platinum is worth its weight in ...

Subject: Memory | October 16, 2013 - 04:55 PM |
Tagged: antec, HCP-850 Platinum, modular psu, 80 Plus Platinum, Antec High Current Pro

If high efficiency is your preference then the Antec High Current Pro series is probably familiar to you.  Legit Reviews just reviewed their most powerful model, providing up to  850W and sporting four 40A 12V rails to power the six PCIe power connectors.  The fully modular design is great for keeping your case clean and the clear labellings on the PSU ensures you can properly balance the load between the 12V rails.  It performed admirably but the retail price of ~$200 did disappoint Legit Reviews somewhat.

HCP85005.jpg

"Today we will be having a close look at the 850W version of the High Current Pro series, the HCP-850. The HCP-850 is a modular power supply with a very long list of features and a seven year long warranty. As all of the High Current Pro products, the HCP-850 also comes with an 80Plus Platinum certification, the highest currently available on a retail product..."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING