Report: NVIDIA To Cut GeForce GTX 900 Series GPU Prices

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 30, 2015 - 03:48 PM |
Tagged: rumor, report, price cut, nvidia, GTX 980, GTX 970, gtx 960, geforce

A report published by TechPowerUp suggests NVIDIA will soon be cutting prices across their existing GeForce lineup, with potential price changes reaching consumers in time for the holiday shopping season.


So what does this report suggest? The GTX 980 drops to $449, the GTX 970 goes to $299, and the GTX 960 goes to $179. These are pretty consistent with some of the sale or post-rebate prices we’ve seen of late, and such a move would certainly even things up somewhat between AMD and NVIDIA with regard to cost. Of course, we could see an answer from AMD in the form of a price reduction from their R9 300-series or Fury/Nano. We can only hope!

We’ve already seen prices come down during various black Friday sales on several GPUs, but the potential for a permanent price cut makes for interesting speculation if nothing else. Not to disparage the source, but no substantive evidence exists to directly point to a plan by NVIDIA to lower their GPU prices for some 900-series cards, but it would make sense given their competition from AMD at various price points.

Here’s to lower prices going forward.

Source: TechPowerUp

NVIDIA Grants $200,000 to UoT for Cancer Research

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 29, 2015 - 05:52 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, cancer research, gpgpu

The University of Toronto has just received a $200,000 grant from the NVIDIA Foundation for research in identifying genetic links to cancer. The institution uses GPUs to learn and identify mutations that cause the disease, which is hoped to eventually help diagnose the attributes of cancer for a specific patient and provide exact treatments. Their “next step” is comparing their technology with data from patients.


I am not too informed on cancer research, so I will point to the article and its sources for specifics. The team state that the libraries they create will be freely available for other biomedical researchers. They don't mention specific licenses or anything, but the article is not really an appropriate venue for that sort of discussion.

Source: nvidia

Fix Coming for AMD Radeon Software Crimson Edition

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 29, 2015 - 05:25 PM |
Tagged: amd, graphics driver, radeon, crimson

Users have been reporting that the latest AMD graphics driver, Radeon Software Crimson Edition, has been incorrectly setting fan speeds. Some users report that the driver spins up fans to 100% and others report that they slow down to 30% regardless of load.


Over the weekend, AMD acknowledged the issue and claim that a fix is intended for Monday.

Some users also claim that the card will stick with that fan setting until it cooks itself. This seems odd to me, since GPUs (and CPUs of course) are now designed to down-volt if temperatures reach unsafe levels, and even cut power entirely if heat cannot be managed. We haven't really seen reports of graphics cards cooking themselves since the Radeon HD 5000 series implemented hardware in response to Furmark and OCCT. That said, the driver bug might some how override these hardware protections.

In the mean time, you'll either want to keep an eye on your fan settings and reset them as necessary, or roll back to the previous driver. AMD didn't comment on the high fan speed issue that some were complaining about, so I'm not sure if this fix will address both issues.

ASUS 20th Anniversary Gold Edition GTX 980 Ti Announced

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 26, 2015 - 09:42 PM |
Tagged: asus, 980 Ti

As most of our readers are well aware, the graphics market is dominated by two GPU vendors, both of which sell chips and reference designs to add-in board partners. ASUS is one of the oldest add-in board partners. According to their anniversary website, ASUS even produced a card that was based on the S3 ViRGE/DX graphics chipset all the way back in 1996.


To celebrate their 20th anniversary, although they don't exactly state when they start counting, ASUS has released a few high-end versions of Maxwell-based graphics cards. This one is the ASUS 20th Anniversary Gold Edition GTX 980 Ti. It comes with a base clock speed of 1266 MHz, which boosts up to 1367 MHz as needed. This is quite high, considering the reference card is clocked at 1000 MHz and boosts to 1189 MHz, although overclocking the 980 Ti is not too difficult to begin with. Ryan got up to 1465 MHz with a reference card. The Gold Edition GTX 980 Ti might go even higher with its enhanced cooling and power delivery, and it's designed for liquid nitrogen if you're that type of enthusiast.


Speaking of liquid nitrogen features, the card advertises a “Memory Defroster” feature that looks rather extreme. I can't say that I've ever seen a graphics card get covered in a visible layer of ice, but I've also never attached it to a reservoir of liquid with a temperature that's easier to write in Kelvin than Celcius.

Is this a legit problem? Or does this seem like “anti-dust shield” to everyone else too?

The ASUS 20th Anniversary Gold Edition GTX 980 Ti ships this month.

Source: ASUS

AMD GPU Architectures pre-GCN Are Now Legacy

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 26, 2015 - 03:09 PM |
Tagged: amd, graphics drivers, GCN, terascale

The Graphics Core Next (GCN) architecture is now a minimum requirement for upcoming AMD graphics drivers. If your graphics card (or APU) uses the TeraScale family of microarchitectures, then your last expected WHQL driver is AMD Catalyst 15.7.1 for Windows 7, 8.x, and 10. You aren't entirely left out of Radeon Software Crimson Edition, however. The latest Crimson Edition Beta driver is compatible with TeraScale, but the upcoming certified one will not be.


GCN was introduced with the AMD Radeon HD 7000 series, although it was only used in the Radeon HD 7700 series GPUs and above. The language doesn't seem to rule out an emergency driver release, such as if Microsoft breaks something in a Windows 10 update that causes bluescreens and fire on older hardware, but they also don't say that they will either. NVIDIA made a similar decision to deprecate pre-Fermi architectures back in March of 2014, which applied to the release of GeForce 343 Drivers in September of that year. Extended support for NVIDIA's old cards end on April 1st, 2016.

I wonder why AMD chose a beta driver to stop with, though. If AMD intended to support TeraScale with Crimson, then why wouldn't they keep it supported until at the first WHQL-certified version? If they didn't intend to support TeraScale, then why go through the effort of supporting it with the beta driver? This implies that AMD reached a hurdle with TeraScale that they didn't want to overcome. That may not be the case, but it's the first thing that comes to my mind none-the-less. Probably the best way to tell is to see how people with Radeon HD 6000-series (or lower-end 7000/8000-series) cards work with Radeon Software Crimson Beta.

Likely the last drivers that users with Radeon HD 6000-series graphics need are 15.7.1 or Radeon Software Crimson Edition Beta. We will soon learn which of the two will be best long-term.

Or, of course, you can buy a newer GPU / APU when you get a chance.

Source: AMD

Giving the R9 Nano some breathing space

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 25, 2015 - 02:54 PM |
Tagged: radeon, r9 nano, mini ITX, amd, obsidian 250d, corsair

When Ryan tested out how the R9 Nano performs in tiny cases he chose the Cooler Master Elite 110, the Raijintek Metis, the Lian Li PC-Q33BL and their PC-Q30X.  The card did slow down somewhat because of a lack of airflow in the case but that was quickly remedied with a drill press and we saw vast improvements in the in-game frequencies.  [H]ard|OCP performed a similar experiment with the Cooler Master Elite 110 as well and found similar results.

They are now back at it again, this time testing in a Corsair Obsidian Series 250D Mini ITX case, which is large enough to accommodate a full sized GPU and provide improved airflow.  They tested the Nano against a GTX 980 Ti and a R9 Fury X as they cost a similar amount to the tiny little Nano.  They tested the cards at both 1440p and 4K resolutions and as you might reasonably expect the Nano fell behind, especially at 4K.  If you have a case which can fit a full sized GPU then the Nano does not make sense to purchase, however in cases in which the larger cards will not fit then the Nano's performance is unmatched.


"Our second installment covering our AMD Radeon R9 Nano in a Small Form Factor chassis is finally done. We will upgrade the case to a Corsair Obsidian Series 250D Mini ITX PC Case and compare the R9 Nano to price competitive video cards that can be installed. We game at 1440p and 4K for the ultimate small form factor experience."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards


Source: [H]ard|OCP

PCPer Live! AMD Radeon Crimson Live Stream and Giveaway!

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 24, 2015 - 09:08 PM |
Tagged: video, radeon software, radeon, live, giveaway, freesync, crimson, contest, amd

UPDATE: Did you miss today's live stream? No worries! You can get the full rundown of the new Radeon Software Crimson Edition driver and get details on new features like FreeSync Low Frame Rate Compensation, DX9 frame pacing, custom resolutions, and more. Check out the video embed below.

It's nearly time for the holidays to begin but that doesn't mean the hardware and software news train comes to a halt! This week we are hosting AMD in the PC Perspective offices for a live stream to discuss the upcoming release of the new AMD Radeon Software Crimson Edition. Earlier in the month we showed you a preview of what changes were coming to the AMD GPU driver and now we are going to not only demo it for you but let the community ask AMD questions directly about it!


And what's a live stream without prizes? AMD has stepped up to the plate to offer up some awesome hardware for those of you that tune in to watch the live stream! 

  • 2 x AMD Radeon R9 Nano 4GB Fiji Graphics Cards
  • 2 x PowerColor PCS+ Radeon R9 380 Graphics Cards




AMD Radeon Software Crimson Live Stream and Giveaway

12pm PT / 3pm ET - November 24th

PC Perspective Live! Page

Need a reminder? Join our live mailing list!

The event will take place Tuesday, November 24th at 12pm PT / 3pm ET at There you’ll be able to catch the live video stream as well as use our chat room to interact with the audience. To win the prizes you will have to be watching the live stream, with exact details of the methodology for handing out the goods coming at the time of the event.

I will be joined by Adrian Costelo, Product Manager for Radeon Software, and Steven Gans, UX Designer for Radeon Software. In short, these are the two people you want to hear from and have answer your questions!

If you have questions, please leave them in the comments below and we'll look through them just before the start of the live stream. Of course you'll be able to tweet us questions @pcper and we'll be keeping an eye on the IRC chat as well for more inquiries. What do you want to know and hear from AMD?

So join us! Set your calendar for Tuesday at 12pm PT / 3pm ET and be here at PC Perspective to catch it. If you are a forgetful type of person, sign up for the PC Perspective Live mailing list that we use exclusively to notify users of upcoming live streaming events including these types of specials and our regular live podcast. I promise, no spam will be had!

Source: PCPer Live!

AMD is the new King of Crimson

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 24, 2015 - 01:36 PM |
Tagged: radeon software, radeon, low frame rate compensation, freesync, frame pacing, crimson, AMD VISION Engine

In case you thought we missed something in our discussion of the new AMD Crimson software you can check out what some of the other websites thought of the new release.  The Tech Report is a good first stop, they used the Fable Legends DX 12 to test the improvements to frametime which will be of interest to those who do not obsess over DX 9 games and their performance.  They also delve a bit more into the interface so you can see what the new screens will look at as well as learning the path that will take you to a familiar settings screen.  Check out their impressions right here.


"AMD's Radeon Software Crimson Edition is the second in a line of major annual graphics driver updates from the company. Crimson also replaces the Catalyst Control Center software with a faster, more refined utility called Radeon Settings. We dug in to see what Crimson has to offer."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Manufacturer: AMD

FreeSync and Frame Pacing Get a Boost

Make sure you catch today's live stream we are hosting with AMD to discuss much more about the new Radeon Software Crimson driver. We are giving away four Radeon graphics cards as well!! Find all the information right here.

Earlier this month AMD announced plans to end the life of the Catalyst Control Center application for control of your Radeon GPU, introducing a new brand simply called Radeon Software. The first iteration of this software, Crimson, is being released today and includes some impressive user experience changes that are really worth seeing and, well, experiencing.

Users will no doubt lament the age of the previous Catalyst Control Center; it was slow, clunky and difficult to navigate around. Radeon Software Crimson changes all of this with a new UI, a new backend that allows it to start up almost instantly, as well as a handful of new features that might be a surprise to some of our readers. Here's a quick rundown of what stands out to me:

  • Opens in less than a second in my testing
  • Completely redesigned and modern user interface
  • Faster display initialization
  • New clean install utility (separate download)
  • Per-game Overdrive (overclocking) settings
  • LiquidVR integration
  • FreeSync improvements at low frame rates
  • FreeSync planned for HDMI (though not implemented yet)
  • Frame pacing support in DX9 titles
  • New custom resolution support
  • Desktop-based Virtual Super Resolution
  • Directional scaling for 2K to 4K upscaling (Fiji GPUs only)
  • Shader cache (precompiled) to reduce compiling-induced frame time variance
  • Non-specific DX12 improvements
  • Flip queue size optimizations (frame buffer length) for specific games
  • Wider target range for Frame Rate Target Control


That's quite a list of new features, some of which will be more popular than others, but it looks like there should be something for everyone to love about the new Crimson software package from AMD.

For this story today I wanted to focus on two of the above features that have long been a sticking point for me, and see how well AMD has fixed them with the first release of Radeon Software.

FreeSync: Low Frame Rate Compensation

I might be slightly biased, but I don't think anyone has done a more thorough job of explaining and diving into the differences between AMD FreeSync and NVIDIA G-Sync than the team at PC Perspective. Since day one of the G-Sync variable refresh release we have been following the changes and capabilities of these competing features and writing about what really separates them from a technological point of view, not just pricing and perceived experiences. 

Continue reading our overview of new features in AMD Radeon Software Crimson!!

The R9 380X arrives

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 19, 2015 - 01:37 PM |
Tagged: asus, strix, Radeon R9 380X, tonga

The full serving of Tonga in the AMD Radeon R9 380X has 32 compute units, 2048 stream processors, 32 ROPs and 128 texture units which compares favourably to the 23CUs, 1792 stream processors, 32 ROPs and 112 texture units of the existing R9 380.  Memory bandwidth and amount is unchanged, 182GB/sec of memory bandwidth at the stock speed of 5.7GHz effective and the GPU clock remains around 970MHz as well.  The MSRP is to be $230 for the base model.

With the specifications out of the way, the next question to answer is how it fares against the direct competition, the GTX 960 and 970.  That is where this review from [H]ard|OCP comes in, with a look at the ASUS STRIX R9 380X DirectCU II OC, running 1030MHz default and 1050MHz at the push of a button.  Their tests at 1440p were a little disappointing, the card did not perform well until advanced graphics settings were reduced but at 1080p they saw great performance with all the bells and whistles turned up.  The pricing will be key to this product, if sellers can keep it at or below MSRP it is a better deal than the GTX 970 but if the prices creep closer then the 970 is the better value.


"AMD has let loose the new AMD Radeon R9 380X GPU, today we evaluate the ASUS STRIX R9 380X OC video card and find out how it compares to a 4GB GeForce GTX 960 and GeForce GTX 970 for a wide picture of where performance lies at 1440p or where it does not at 1440p considering your viewpoint."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Source: [H]ard|OCP