Rumor: Web Developer Tools Leaked the R9 290X Price?

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards | October 11, 2013 - 04:47 PM |
Tagged: amd, R9 290X

When you deal with the web, almost nothing is hidden. The browsers (and some extensions) have access to just about everything on screen and off. Anyone browsing a site or app can inspect the contents and even modify it. That last part could be key.

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TechPowerUp got their hands on a screenshot of developer tools inspecting the Newegg website. A few elements are hidden on the right hand side within the "Coming Soon" container. One element, id of "singleFinalPrice", is set "visibility: hidden;" with a price as its contents. In the TechPowerUp screenshot, this price is listed as "729.99" USD.

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Of course, good journalism is confirming this yourself. As of the time I checked, this value is listed as "9999.99" USD. This means either one of two things: Newegg changed their value to a placeholder after the leak was discovered or the source of TechPowerUp's screenshot used those same developer tools to modify the content. It is actually a remarkably easy thing to do... here I change the value to 99 cents by right clicking on the element and modifying the HTML.

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No, the R9 290X is not 99 cents.

So I would be careful to take these screenshots with a grain of salt if we only have access to one source. That said, $729.99 does sound like a reasonable price point for AMD to release a Titan-competitor at. Of course, that is exactly what a hoaxer would want.

But, as it stands right now, I would not get your hopes up. An MSRP of ~$699-$749 USD sounds legitimate but we do not have even a second source, at the moment, to confirm that. Still, this might be something our readers would like to know.

Source: TechPowerUp

Valve Confirms Steam Machines are not NVIDIA Exclusive

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards, Systems | October 10, 2013 - 06:59 PM |
Tagged: amd, nvidia, Intel, Steam Machine

This should be little-to-no surprise for the viewers of our podcast, as this story was discussed there, but Valve has confirmed AMD and Intel graphics are compatible with Steam Machines. Doug Lombardi of Valve commented by email to, apparently, multiple sources including Forbes and Maximum PC.

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Last week, we posted some technical specs of our first wave of Steam Machine prototypes. Although the graphics hardware that we've selected for the first wave of prototypes is a variety of NVIDIA cards, that is not an indication that Steam Machines are NVIDIA-only. In 2014, there will be Steam Machines commercially available with graphics hardware made by AMD, NVIDIA, and Intel. Valve has worked closely together with all three of these companies on optimizing their hardware for SteamOS, and will continue to do so into the foreseeable future.

Ryan and the rest of the podcast crew found the whole situation, "Odd". They could not understand why AMD referred the press to Doug Lombardi rather than circulate a canned statement from him. It was also weird why NVIDIA had an exclusive on the beta program with AMD being commercially available in 2014.

As I have said in the initial post: for what seems to be deliberate non-committal to a specific hardware spec, why limit to a single graphics provider?

Source: Maximum PC

The custom R9's have arrived

Subject: Graphics Cards | October 10, 2013 - 03:29 PM |
Tagged: radeon, r9 270x, GCN, sapphire, toxic edition, factory overclocked

We saw the release of the reference R9s yesterday and today we get to see the custom models such as the Sapphire TOXIC R9 270X which Legit Reviews just finished benchmarking.  The TOXIC sports a 100MHz overclock on both GPU and RAM as well as a custom cooler with three fans.  While it remains a two slot GPU it is longer than the reference model and requires a full foot of clearance inside the case.  Read on to see what kind of performance boost you can expect and how much further you can push this card.

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"When it comes to discrete graphics, the $199 price point is known as the gamer’s sweet spot by both AMD and NVIDIA. This is arguably the front line in the battle for your money when it coming to gaming graphics cards. The AMD Radeon R9 270X is AMD’s offering to gamers at this competitive price point. Read on to see how it performs!"

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Win a copy of Batman: Arkham Origins courtesy of NVIDIA

Subject: Editorial, General Tech, Graphics Cards | October 10, 2013 - 03:28 PM |
Tagged: podcast, nvidia, contest, batman arkham origins

UPDATE: We picked our winner for week 1 but now you can enter for week 2!!!  See the new podcast episode listed below!!

Back in August NVIDIA announced that they would be teaming up with Warner Bros. Interactive to include copies of the upcoming Batman: Arkham Origins game with select NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards. While that's great and all, wouldn't you rather get one for free next week from PC Perspective?

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Great, you're in luck!  We have a handful of keys to give out to listeners and viewers of the PC Perspective Podcast.  Here's how you enter:

  1. Listen to or watch episode #272 of the PC Perspective Podcast and listen for the "secret phrase" as mentioned in the show!
  2. Subscribe to our RSS feed for the podcast or subscribe to our YouTube channel.
  3. Fill out the form at the bottom of this podcast page with the "secret phrase" and you're entered!

I'll draw a winner before the next podcast and announce it on the show!  We'll giveaway one copy each of the next two weeks!  Our thanks goes to NVIDIA for supplying the Batman: Arkham Origins keys for this contest!!

No restrictions on winning, so good luck!!

ASUS Announces AMD Radeon R9 and R7 200 Series Graphics Cards

Subject: Graphics Cards | October 9, 2013 - 12:32 PM |
Tagged: R9 280X DirectCU II, R9 270X DirectCU II, R7 260X DirectCU II, R7 250, R7 240, Matrix R9 280X, asus

Editor's Note: Be sure to check out our full review of the new AMD Radeon R9 280X, R9 270X and R7 260X that includes the ASUS overclocked 280X!

Fremont, CA (October 8, 2013) - ASUS today announces the launch of its R9 200 and R7 200 Series graphics cards, powered by the latest AMD Radeon R9 and R7 series graphics-processing units (GPUs). As dedicated gamers have come to expect from Republic of Gamers (ROG), the new Matrix R9 280X graphics card feature exclusive technologies, overclocked core speeds and performance enhancing options.

The new R9 280X, R9 270X and R7 260X DirectCU II models are overclocked to perform faster than reference designs while also featuring DIGI+ voltage-regulator modules (VRMs) for a smooth and stable power supply and GPU Tweak software for tuning the graphics card. The new R7 250 and R7 240 cards benefit from many exclusive ASUS technologies and tools including Super Alloy Power components for superior stability, dust-proof fans for improved card lifespan and GPU Tweak.

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Matrix — Push the limits
The Matrix R9 280X graphics cards benefit from a copper-based thermal design that conducts heat away from the GPU with greater efficiency. Compared to reference Radeon R9 280X designs, ROG Matrix R9 280X cards operate up to 20% cooler and three times (3X) quieter. Coupled with dual 100mm cooling fans, gamers can enjoy ultra-cool and stable game play with minimal noise. The Matrix R9 280X Platinum Edition’s core runs at a blistering 1100MHz — 100MHz higher than reference.

The Matrix R9 280X graphics card allows for overclocking on a purely hardware level with VGA Hotwire connections and TweakIt for voltage control, Turbo Fan button to crank up the fan to 100% and a Safe Mode button to instantly default the GPU back to factory BIOs. It also includes DIGI+ voltage-regulator modules (VRMs) for smooth and stable power, and GPU Tweak tuning software that allows users to squeeze the last drop of performance out of their graphics card.

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DirectCU II — Faster, quieter and cooler, even in the heat of battle
ASUS DirectCU II cooling technology places highly conductive copper cooling pipes in direct contact with a card’s GPU so heat dissipates quickly and with greater efficiency. Compared with reference Radeon R9 and R7 designs, ASUS R9 280X, R9 270X and R7 260X with DirectCU II allow the latest AMD Radeon GPUs to run up to 20% cooler, three times (3X) quieter– so gamers can enjoy ultra-stable play with minimal noise.

ASUS R9 280X, R9 270X and R7 260X are all equipped with exclusive ASUS DIGI+ VRM with Super Alloy Power technology. Paired with Super Alloy Power solid-state capacitors, concrete-core chokes and hardened MOSFETs, DIGI+ VRM delivers multi-phase power and digital voltage regulation for increased graphics card stability and cleaner power, even during the most intense GPU activities.

The fans of ASUS R9 280X, R9 270X, and R7 260X DirectCU II are all dust-proof, reducing debris accumulation and retaining peak performance over a longer lifespan. In addition, ASUS R9 280X DirectCU II features exclusive CoolTech fan. This innovative fan’s hybrid blade and bearing design, with inner radial blower and outer flower-shaped blades, delivers multi-directional airflow to accelerate heat removal and maintain cooler and quieter operation.

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R7 250 and R7 240 — Super Alloy Power components and dust-proof fans for superior stability and longevity
The ASUS R7 250 and R7 240 graphics cards both include exclusive Super Alloy Power technology. Super Alloy Power’s solid-state capacitors and hardened MOSFETs all withstand much greater stress and heat due to the application of specially-formulated materials — increasing reliability and overall card lifespan. Compared with reference designs, ASUS R7 250 and R7 240’s Super Alloy Power components deliver 35%-cooler operation and a lifespan that’s up to two-and-a-half times (2.5X) longer.

Additionally, the fans on the ASUS R7 250 and R7 240 are extremely resilient and dust-proof. The Dust-Proof fans ensures that even the smallest airborne particles are barred, reducing debris accumulation and retaining peak performance over a longer lifespan — typically improving lifespan by up to 25% compared to reference fans.

GPU Tweak- Easy overclocking and online streaming
The included ASUS GPU Tweak utility enables R9 280X, R9 270X, R7 260X, R7 250, and R7 240 users intuitive control over GPU and video-memory clock speeds and voltages, cooling-fan speeds and power-consumption thresholds – so they can overclock easily with confidence. Users can create multiple performance profiles for on-demand switching of custom settings for different games.

GPU Tweak now includes Live Streaming, an online-streaming tool that lets users share on-screen action over the internet in real time – so others can watch live gaming sessions. It is even possible to add scrolling text, pictures and webcam images to the streaming window.

Source: ASUS

Hello again Tahiti

Subject: Graphics Cards | October 8, 2013 - 05:30 PM |
Tagged: amd, GCN, graphics core next, hd 7790, hd 7870 ghz edition, hd 7970 ghz edition, r7 260x, r9 270x, r9 280x, radeon, ASUS R9 280X DirectCU II TOP

AMD's rebranded cards have arrived, though with a few improvements to the GCN architecture that we already know so well.  This particular release seems to be focused on price for performance which is certainly not a bad thing in these uncertain times.  The 7970 GHz Edition launched at $500, while the new R9 280X will arrive at $300 which is a rather significant price drop and one which we hope doesn't damage AMD's bottom line too badly in the coming quarters.  [H]ard|OCP chose the ASUS R9 280X DirectCU II TOP to test, with a custom PCB from ASUS and a mild overclock which helped it pull ahead of the 7970 GHz.  AMD has tended towards leading off new graphics card families with the low and midrange models, we have yet to see the top of the line R9 290X in action yet.

Ryan's review, including frame pacing, can be found right here.

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"We evaluate the new ASUS R9 280X DirectCU II TOP video card and compare it to GeForce GTX 770 and Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition. We will find out which video card provides the best value and performance in the $300 price segment. Does it provide better performance a than its "competition" in the ~$400 price range?"

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Source: [H]ard|OCP
Author:
Manufacturer: AMD

The AMD Radeon R9 280X

Today marks the first step in an introduction of an entire AMD Radeon discrete graphics product stack revamp. Between now and the end of 2013, AMD will completely cycle out Radeon HD 7000 cards and replace them with a new branding scheme. The "HD" branding is on its way out and it makes sense. Consumers have moved on to UHD and WQXGA display standards; HD is no longer extraordinary.

But I want to be very clear and upfront with you: today is not the day that you’ll learn about the new Hawaii GPU that AMD promised would dominate the performance per dollar metrics for enthusiasts.  The Radeon R9 290X will be a little bit down the road.  Instead, today’s review will look at three other Radeon products: the R9 280X, the R9 270X and the R7 260X.  None of these products are really “new”, though, and instead must be considered rebrands or repositionings. 

There are some changes to discuss with each of these products, including clock speeds and more importantly, pricing.  Some are specific to a certain model, others are more universal (such as updated Eyefinity display support). 

Let’s start with the R9 280X.

 

AMD Radeon R9 280X – Tahiti aging gracefully

The AMD Radeon R9 280X is built from the exact same ASIC (chip) that powers the previous Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition with a few modest changes.  The core clock speed of the R9 280X is actually a little bit lower at reference rates than the Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition by about 50 MHz.  The R9 280X GPU will hit a 1.0 GHz rate while the previous model was reaching 1.05 GHz; not much a change but an interesting decision to be made for sure.

Because of that speed difference the R9 280X has a lower peak compute capability of 4.1 TFLOPS compared to the 4.3 TFLOPS of the 7970 GHz.  The memory clock speed is the same (6.0 Gbps) and the board power is the same, with a typical peak of 250 watts.

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Everything else remains the same as you know it on the HD 7970 cards.  There are 2048 stream processors in the Tahiti version of AMD’s GCN (Graphics Core Next), 128 texture units and 32 ROPs all being pushed by a 384-bit GDDR5 memory bus running at 6.0 GHz.  Yep, still with a 3GB frame buffer.

Continue reading our review of the AMD Radeon R9 280X, R9 270X and R7 260X!!!

Steam Machine Specifications Revealed...?

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards, Cases and Cooling, Systems | October 4, 2013 - 07:19 PM |
Tagged: valve, Steam Machine

Well, that did not take long.

Valve announced the Steam Machines barely over a week ago and could not provide hardware specifications. While none of these will be available for purchase, the honor of taking money reserved for system builders and OEMs, Valve has announced hardware specifications for their beta device.

Rather, they announced a few of them?

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The raw specifications, or range of them, are:

  • GPU: NVIDIA GeForce Titan through GeForce GTX660 (780 and 760 possible)
  • CPU: Intel i7-4770 or i5-4570, or i3-something
  • RAM: 16GB DDR3-1600 (CPU), 3GB GDDR5 (GPU)
  • Storage: 1TB/8GB Hybrid SSHD
  • Power Supply: 450W
  • Dimensions: approx. 12" x 12.4" x 2.9"

Really the only reason I could see for the spread of performance is to not pressure developers into targeting a single reference design. This is odd, since every reference design contains an NVIDIA GPU which (you would expect) a company who wants to encourage an open mind would not have such a glaring omission. I could speculate about driver compatibility with SteamOS and media streaming but even that feels far-fetched.

On the geeky side of things: the potential for a GeForce Titan is fairly awesome and, along with the minimum GeForce 660, is the first sign that I might be wrong about this whole media center extender thing. My expectation was that Valve would acknowledge some developers might want a streaming-focused device.

Above all, I somewhat hope Valve is a bit more clear to consumers with their intent... especially if their intent is to be unclear with OEMs for some reason.

AMD Published GPU Guides for Open Source Community

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards | October 2, 2013 - 09:03 PM |
Tagged: amd, linux

Last week, NVIDIA published documentation for Nouveau to heal wounds with the open source community. AMD had a better reputation and intends to maintain it. On Tuesday, Alex Deucher published 9 PDF documents, 1178 pages of register and acceleration documentation along with 18 pages of HDA GPU audio programming details, compared to the 42 pages NVIDIA published.

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Sure, a page to page comparison is meaningless, but it is clear AMD did not want to be outdone. This is especially true when you consider that some of these documents date back to early 2009. Still, reactionary or not, the open source community should accept the assistance with open arms... and open x86s?

I should note that these documents do not cover Volcanic Islands; they are for everything between Evergreen and Sea Islands.

Source: AMD

ARMA III is designed solely for the PC and it shows

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards | October 2, 2013 - 02:20 PM |
Tagged: gaming, ARMA III

Forget Crysis, if you want to hammer your PC pick up ARMA III and try turning up the settings!  Even an i7-3770K @ 4.8GHz and GTX 780's in SLI struggle to render this game with all the graphical bells and whistles turned on.  The close up landscapes and objects are gorgeous with high quality textures but to truly get into the feel of the game you need to be able to turn up the veiw distance and number of displayed objects as you can see from [H]ard|OCP's screenshots below.  [H] spent ia bit of time breaking down the best playable settings for numerous GPUs from NVIDIA and AMD as well as showing you the impact that MSAA and PPAA has on the visual quality as well as your PCs performance.  If you want to show off the superiority of a high end gaming machine then this is the game for you.

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"ARMA III is our focus point for today. It features a large open world environment designed on a massive continent measuring 270 square kilometers. To go along side this massive continent is a max visibility range of 20km. Combine this with ARMA III's impressive looking graphics and we have a game that demands performance."

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Source: [H]ard|OCP