Giving the R9 Nano some breathing space

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 25, 2015 - 02:54 PM |
Tagged: radeon, r9 nano, mini ITX, amd, obsidian 250d, corsair

When Ryan tested out how the R9 Nano performs in tiny cases he chose the Cooler Master Elite 110, the Raijintek Metis, the Lian Li PC-Q33BL and their PC-Q30X.  The card did slow down somewhat because of a lack of airflow in the case but that was quickly remedied with a drill press and we saw vast improvements in the in-game frequencies.  [H]ard|OCP performed a similar experiment with the Cooler Master Elite 110 as well and found similar results.

They are now back at it again, this time testing in a Corsair Obsidian Series 250D Mini ITX case, which is large enough to accommodate a full sized GPU and provide improved airflow.  They tested the Nano against a GTX 980 Ti and a R9 Fury X as they cost a similar amount to the tiny little Nano.  They tested the cards at both 1440p and 4K resolutions and as you might reasonably expect the Nano fell behind, especially at 4K.  If you have a case which can fit a full sized GPU then the Nano does not make sense to purchase, however in cases in which the larger cards will not fit then the Nano's performance is unmatched.


"Our second installment covering our AMD Radeon R9 Nano in a Small Form Factor chassis is finally done. We will upgrade the case to a Corsair Obsidian Series 250D Mini ITX PC Case and compare the R9 Nano to price competitive video cards that can be installed. We game at 1440p and 4K for the ultimate small form factor experience."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards


Source: [H]ard|OCP

PCPer Live! AMD Radeon Crimson Live Stream and Giveaway!

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 24, 2015 - 09:08 PM |
Tagged: video, radeon software, radeon, live, giveaway, freesync, crimson, contest, amd

UPDATE: Did you miss today's live stream? No worries! You can get the full rundown of the new Radeon Software Crimson Edition driver and get details on new features like FreeSync Low Frame Rate Compensation, DX9 frame pacing, custom resolutions, and more. Check out the video embed below.

It's nearly time for the holidays to begin but that doesn't mean the hardware and software news train comes to a halt! This week we are hosting AMD in the PC Perspective offices for a live stream to discuss the upcoming release of the new AMD Radeon Software Crimson Edition. Earlier in the month we showed you a preview of what changes were coming to the AMD GPU driver and now we are going to not only demo it for you but let the community ask AMD questions directly about it!


And what's a live stream without prizes? AMD has stepped up to the plate to offer up some awesome hardware for those of you that tune in to watch the live stream! 

  • 2 x AMD Radeon R9 Nano 4GB Fiji Graphics Cards
  • 2 x PowerColor PCS+ Radeon R9 380 Graphics Cards




AMD Radeon Software Crimson Live Stream and Giveaway

12pm PT / 3pm ET - November 24th

PC Perspective Live! Page

Need a reminder? Join our live mailing list!

The event will take place Tuesday, November 24th at 12pm PT / 3pm ET at There you’ll be able to catch the live video stream as well as use our chat room to interact with the audience. To win the prizes you will have to be watching the live stream, with exact details of the methodology for handing out the goods coming at the time of the event.

I will be joined by Adrian Costelo, Product Manager for Radeon Software, and Steven Gans, UX Designer for Radeon Software. In short, these are the two people you want to hear from and have answer your questions!

If you have questions, please leave them in the comments below and we'll look through them just before the start of the live stream. Of course you'll be able to tweet us questions @pcper and we'll be keeping an eye on the IRC chat as well for more inquiries. What do you want to know and hear from AMD?

So join us! Set your calendar for Tuesday at 12pm PT / 3pm ET and be here at PC Perspective to catch it. If you are a forgetful type of person, sign up for the PC Perspective Live mailing list that we use exclusively to notify users of upcoming live streaming events including these types of specials and our regular live podcast. I promise, no spam will be had!

Source: PCPer Live!

AMD is the new King of Crimson

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 24, 2015 - 01:36 PM |
Tagged: radeon software, radeon, low frame rate compensation, freesync, frame pacing, crimson, AMD VISION Engine

In case you thought we missed something in our discussion of the new AMD Crimson software you can check out what some of the other websites thought of the new release.  The Tech Report is a good first stop, they used the Fable Legends DX 12 to test the improvements to frametime which will be of interest to those who do not obsess over DX 9 games and their performance.  They also delve a bit more into the interface so you can see what the new screens will look at as well as learning the path that will take you to a familiar settings screen.  Check out their impressions right here.


"AMD's Radeon Software Crimson Edition is the second in a line of major annual graphics driver updates from the company. Crimson also replaces the Catalyst Control Center software with a faster, more refined utility called Radeon Settings. We dug in to see what Crimson has to offer."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Manufacturer: AMD

FreeSync and Frame Pacing Get a Boost

Make sure you catch today's live stream we are hosting with AMD to discuss much more about the new Radeon Software Crimson driver. We are giving away four Radeon graphics cards as well!! Find all the information right here.

Earlier this month AMD announced plans to end the life of the Catalyst Control Center application for control of your Radeon GPU, introducing a new brand simply called Radeon Software. The first iteration of this software, Crimson, is being released today and includes some impressive user experience changes that are really worth seeing and, well, experiencing.

Users will no doubt lament the age of the previous Catalyst Control Center; it was slow, clunky and difficult to navigate around. Radeon Software Crimson changes all of this with a new UI, a new backend that allows it to start up almost instantly, as well as a handful of new features that might be a surprise to some of our readers. Here's a quick rundown of what stands out to me:

  • Opens in less than a second in my testing
  • Completely redesigned and modern user interface
  • Faster display initialization
  • New clean install utility (separate download)
  • Per-game Overdrive (overclocking) settings
  • LiquidVR integration
  • FreeSync improvements at low frame rates
  • FreeSync planned for HDMI (though not implemented yet)
  • Frame pacing support in DX9 titles
  • New custom resolution support
  • Desktop-based Virtual Super Resolution
  • Directional scaling for 2K to 4K upscaling (Fiji GPUs only)
  • Shader cache (precompiled) to reduce compiling-induced frame time variance
  • Non-specific DX12 improvements
  • Flip queue size optimizations (frame buffer length) for specific games
  • Wider target range for Frame Rate Target Control


That's quite a list of new features, some of which will be more popular than others, but it looks like there should be something for everyone to love about the new Crimson software package from AMD.

For this story today I wanted to focus on two of the above features that have long been a sticking point for me, and see how well AMD has fixed them with the first release of Radeon Software.

FreeSync: Low Frame Rate Compensation

I might be slightly biased, but I don't think anyone has done a more thorough job of explaining and diving into the differences between AMD FreeSync and NVIDIA G-Sync than the team at PC Perspective. Since day one of the G-Sync variable refresh release we have been following the changes and capabilities of these competing features and writing about what really separates them from a technological point of view, not just pricing and perceived experiences. 

Continue reading our overview of new features in AMD Radeon Software Crimson!!

The R9 380X arrives

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 19, 2015 - 01:37 PM |
Tagged: asus, strix, Radeon R9 380X, tonga

The full serving of Tonga in the AMD Radeon R9 380X has 32 compute units, 2048 stream processors, 32 ROPs and 128 texture units which compares favourably to the 23CUs, 1792 stream processors, 32 ROPs and 112 texture units of the existing R9 380.  Memory bandwidth and amount is unchanged, 182GB/sec of memory bandwidth at the stock speed of 5.7GHz effective and the GPU clock remains around 970MHz as well.  The MSRP is to be $230 for the base model.

With the specifications out of the way, the next question to answer is how it fares against the direct competition, the GTX 960 and 970.  That is where this review from [H]ard|OCP comes in, with a look at the ASUS STRIX R9 380X DirectCU II OC, running 1030MHz default and 1050MHz at the push of a button.  Their tests at 1440p were a little disappointing, the card did not perform well until advanced graphics settings were reduced but at 1080p they saw great performance with all the bells and whistles turned up.  The pricing will be key to this product, if sellers can keep it at or below MSRP it is a better deal than the GTX 970 but if the prices creep closer then the 970 is the better value.


"AMD has let loose the new AMD Radeon R9 380X GPU, today we evaluate the ASUS STRIX R9 380X OC video card and find out how it compares to a 4GB GeForce GTX 960 and GeForce GTX 970 for a wide picture of where performance lies at 1440p or where it does not at 1440p considering your viewpoint."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Source: [H]ard|OCP

AMD R9 Fury X Voltage and HBM Unlocked with Sapphire TriXX 5.2.1

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 18, 2015 - 01:22 PM |
Tagged: Sapphire TriXX, R9 Fury X, overclocking, hbm, amd

The new version (5.2.1) of Sapphire's TriXX overclocking utility has been released, and it finally unlocks voltage and HBM overclocking for AMD's R9 Fury X.


(Image credit: Sapphire)

Previously the voltage of the R9 Fury X core was not adjustable, leaving what would seem to be quite a bit of untapped headroom for the cards which shipped with a powerful liquid-cooling solution rated for 500 watts of thermal dissipation. This should allow for much better results than what Ryan was able to achieve when he attempted overclocking for our review of the R9 Fury X in June (without the benefit of voltage adjustments):

"My net result: a clock speed of 1155 MHz rather than 1050 MHz, an increase of 10%. That's a decent overclock for a first attempt with a brand new card and new architecture, but from the way that AMD had built up the "500 watt cooler" and the "375 watts available power" from the dual 8-pin power connectors, I was honestly expecting quite a bit more. Hopefully we'll see some community adjustments, like voltage modifications, that we can mess around with later..."


(Image credit: Sapphire)

Will TriXX v5.2.1 unleash the full potential of the Fury X? We will have to wait for some overclocked benchmark numbers, but having the ability can only be a good thing for enthusiasts.

Source: WCCFtech

AMD Plans Two GPUs in 2016

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 16, 2015 - 09:34 PM |
Tagged: amd, radeon, GCN

Late last week, Forbes published an editorial by Patrick Moorhead, who spoke with Raja Koduri about AMD's future in the GPU industry. Patrick was a Corporate Vice President at AMD until late 2011. He then created Moor Insights and Strategy, which provides industry analysis. He regularly publishes editorials to Forbes and CIO. Raja Koduri is the head of the Radeon Technologies Group at AMD.


I'm going to be focusing on a brief mention a little more than half-way through, though. According to the editorial, Raja stated that AMD will release two new GPUs in 2016. “He promised two brand new GPUs in 2016, which are hopefully going to both be 14nm/16nm FinFET from GlobalFoundries or TSMC and will help make Advanced Micro Devices more power and die size competitive.”

We have been expecting AMD's Artic Islands to arrive at some point in 2016, which will compete with NVIDIA's Pascal architecture at the high end. AMD's product stack has been relatively stale for a while, with most of the innovation occurring at the top end and pushing the previous top-end down a bit. Two new GPU architectures almost definitely mean that a second one will focus on the lower end of the market, making more compelling products on smaller processes to be more power efficient, cheaper per unit, and include newer features.

Add the recent report of the Antigua architecture, which I assume is in addition to AMD's two architecture announcement, and AMD's product stack could look much less familiar next year.

Source: Forbes

Putting the R9 Nano under the microscope

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 13, 2015 - 03:30 PM |
Tagged: radeon, r9 nano, amd

We are not the only ones investigating usage scenarios for AMD's tiny R9 Nano, [H]ard|OCP has also recently looked at this card to determine if or when there is a good reason to pay the extra price for this tiny GPU.  This particular review focuses on performance against a similarly sized Gigabyte GTX 970 in a Cooler Master Elite 110, there will be a follow up in which the cards will run inside a Corsair Obsidian Series 250D case.  At 1080p the cards performed at very similar levels with the significantly more expensive Nano holding a small lead while at 1440p the R9 Nano truly shines.  This card is certainly not for everyone and both the FuryX and GTX 980 Ti offer much better performance at a simliar price point but neither of them will fit inside the case of someone determined to build a tiny gaming machine.


"This evaluation will compare the new retail purchased Radeon R9 Nano with a GIGABYTE GeForce GTX 970 N970-IX-OC small form factor video card in a mini-ITX Cooler Master Elite 110 Intel Skylake system build. We will find out if the higher priced Nano is worth the money for a 1440p and 1080p gameplay experience in a tiny footprint. "

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Basemark GPU Vulkan Announced for Q2'16 Release

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 10, 2015 - 03:02 PM |
Tagged: vulkan

The Vulkan API, announced during the Game Developers Conference last March, is a low-level method to communicate with GPUs. It is essentially a fork of AMD's Mantle, which was modified to include things like OpenCL's SPIR bytecode for its shading and compute language, rather than DirectX and Mantle's HLSL (or OpenGL's GLSL). At the time, Khronos mentioned that Vulkan is expected to be released in 2015, and that they intend to “under promise and over deliver” on that schedule. Being November, I expect that something came up, which isn't too surprising as Microsoft seems to have similar issues with DirectX 12.


That said, Basemark has just announced that they will have (at least one?) Vulkan-compatible benchmark available in Q2 2016. It is unclear whether they mean calendar year or some arbitrary fiscal year. Basemark GPU Vulkan is planned to focus on “relevant Vulkan API performance tests as opposed to theoretical workloads”. This sounds like more than a high-draw, low detail technical demo, which is an interesting metric, but one that will probably be covered elsewhere (like the competing 3DMark from Futuremark).

Hopefully the roll-out, for developers at the very least, will occur this year, though.

Source: Basemark

NVIDIA Releases Driver 358.91 for Fallout 4, Star Wars Battlefront, Legacy of the Void

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 9, 2015 - 01:44 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, geforce, 358.91, fallout 4, Star Wars, battlefront, starcraft, legacy of the void

It's a huge month for PC gaming with the release of Bethesda's Fallout 4 and EA's Star Wars Battlefront likely to take up hours and hours of your (and my) time in the lead up to the holiday season. NVIDIA just passed over links to its latest "Game Ready" driver, version 358.91.


Fallout 4 is going to be impressive graphically

Here's the blurb from NVIDIA directly:

Continuing to fulfill our commitment to GeForce gamers to have them Game Ready for the top Holiday titles, today we released a new Game Ready driver.  This Game Ready driver will get GeForce Gamers set-up for tomorrow’s release of Fallout 4, as well as Star Wars Battlefront, StarCraft II: Legacy of the Void. WHQLed and ready for the Fallout wasteland, driver version 358.91 will deliver the best experience for GeForce gamers in some of the holiday’s hottest titles.

Other than learning that NVIDIA considers "WHQLed" to be a verb now, this is good news for PC gamers looking to dive into the world of Fallout or take up arms against the Empire on the day of release. I honestly believe that these kinds of software updates and frequent driver improvements timed to major game releases is one of the biggest advantages that GeForce gamers have over Radeon users; though I hold out hope that the red team will get on the same cadence with one Raja Koduri in charge.

You can also find more information from NVIDIA about configuration with its own GPUs for Fallout 4 and for Star Wars Battlefront on

Source: NVIDIA