Reactions to Intel's purchase of McAfee

Subject: General Tech | August 20, 2010 - 12:11 PM |

It is obvious that a lot of reasons went into Intel's acquisition of McAfee, not even Intel tosses around $7.68 billion on a lark.  The reasons are not apparent right away as the news came out of the blue and was not talked about long before hand like many other acquisitions such as Havok.  ExtremeTech feels that this is obviously about a focus on security, perhaps signalling the interest of Intel to mimic what they have done bringing graphics onboard the CPU and merging security and antivirus

X-Arcade Solo Joystick, just like you snapped the front of of an old arcade game

Subject: General Tech | August 19, 2010 - 06:44 PM |

Not only does it look exactly like the front panel of a classic stand up arcade game, it can plug into a USB or PS/2 plug and it comes with Gauntlet, Rampage, Robotron 2084, Joust, Defender and Smash TV. 
You can get some old school button mashing, 8-direction only joystick wiggling gaming action in, either with old games or even with new then this is probably right up your alley.  With multiple keystrokes easily assignable to a single button there is a lot of fun that could be had and its nigh indestructible
frame means you can let small children and drunk friends try it out wit

Source: Neoseeker

The headphones are mediocre but the MixAmp is a nifty idea

Subject: General Tech | August 19, 2010 - 11:39 AM |

[H]ard|OCP just finished reviewing the Astro A40 Gaming Headset and MixAmp
as a set but ended their review recommending the purchase of the MixAmp alone.  The reason for this is not that the headphones are awful but the competition they face at the $200 mark does the job better.  It is the less familiar part that takes kudos away from their review as it can do many tricks without needed the A40 to do so.  The MixAmp

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Intel to Acquire McAfee

Subject: General Tech | August 19, 2010 - 11:23 AM |

News Highlights:

  • Purchase of all of McAfee’s common stock for $48 per share in cash, valuing the deal at approximately $7.68 billion. McAfee will operate as a wholly-owned subsidiary, reporting into Intel’s Software and Services Group.
  • Acquisition enables a combination of security software and hardware from one company to ultimately better protect consumers, corporations and governments as billions of devices - and the server and cloud networks that manage them - go online.
  • Intel elevates focus on security on par with energy-efficient performance and connectivity. The acquisition augments Intel’s mobile wireless strategy, helping to better assure customer and consumer security concerns as these billions of devices connect.
  • Intel has made a number of software-related acquisitions of leaders in their respective industries that also rely on great silicon, including Wind River, Havok and now McAfee.



SANTA CLARA, Calif., Aug. 19, 2010 – Intel Corporation has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire McAfee, Inc., through the purchase of all of the company’s common stock at $48 per share in cash, for approximately $7.68 billion. Both boards of directors have unanimously approved the deal, which is expected to close after McAfee shareholder approval, regulatory clearances and other customary conditions specified in the agreement.

The acquisition reflects that security is now a fundamental component of online computing. Today’s security approach does not fully address the billions of new Internet-ready devices connecting, including mobile and wireless devices, TVs, cars, medical devices and ATM machines as well as the accompanying surge in cyber threats. Providing protection to a diverse online world requires a fundamentally new approach involving software, hardware and services.

Inside Intel, the company has elevated the priority of security to be on par with its strategic focus areas in energy-efficient performance and Internet connectivity.

McAfee, which has enjoyed double-digit, year-over-year growth and nearly 80 percent gross margins last year, will become a wholly-owned subsidiary of Intel, reporting into Intel’s Software and Services Group. The group is managed by Renée James, Intel senior vice president, and general manager of the group.

“With the rapid expansion of growth across a vast array of Internet-connected devices, more and more of the elements of our lives have moved online,” said Paul Otellini, Intel president and CEO. “In the past, energy-efficient performance and connectivity have defined computing requirements. Looking forward, security will join those as a third pillar of what people demand from all computing experiences.

“The addition of McAfee products and technologies into the Intel computing portfolio brings us incredibly talented people with a track record of delivering security innovations, products and services that the industry and consumers trust to make connecting to the Internet safer and more secure,” Otellini added.

“Hardware-enhanced security will lead to breakthroughs in effectively countering the increasingly sophisticated threats of today and tomorrow,” said James. “This acquisition is consistent with our software and services strategy to deliver an outstanding computing experience in fast-growing business areas, especially around the move to wireless mobility.”

Expanding platter based storage with bit patterns

Subject: General Tech | August 19, 2010 - 11:19 AM |

Toshiba thinks it has made a break through that will soon allow them to utilize a process to increase storage density immensely.  Companies have been bandying about a process where tiny patterned dots are formed on the recording surface as opposed to a contiguous line of magnetized grains that is used on current drives.  Each of these tiny self assembled dots, currently 17nm, holds one bit and because it is more separated from its neighbour the density can be ramped up to the neighbourhood of 2.5Tb per inch2.  That would bring a 25TB HDD well into the realm of possibi

Source: Extremetech

An MMO for tankers

Subject: General Tech | August 18, 2010 - 12:39 PM |

The new game World of Tanks sounded to Gaming Heaven to likely be an intricate tank simulator with complexity on the level of a Jane's Aircraft Sim, so when they realized the tank was controlled via WASD and the mouse they were quite taken aback.  Their preconceptions couldn't be further from the truth, this is more of an MMO with a bit of RPG elements and a whole bunch of HE shells.  In one case they saw about 60 tanks running amok blowing each other to Kingdom Come.  Their were a few balance issues in the preview that they tried

As The GPGPU Turns, the soap opera for geeks

Subject: General Tech | August 18, 2010 - 12:05 PM |

As a group, geeks get excited over things that tend to leave the rest of the population scratching their heads in confusion but only because they can't follow what is being discussed.  Take for instance Josh's excitement at getting an inside scoop on the saga of BFG, Best Buy and AMD and the licensing agreement that is tearing them apart. 

As interesting as that information is it is a subplot in our serial, the main thread is the emergence of GPGPU's and the drama of AMD and nVIDIA.  The Inquirer takes a long look at what the market is currently like, as we have new Fermi based Tesla HPC cards coming from nVIDIA and AMD's Firestream series has recently had an update as well.  The hardware is certainly one aspect of our plot, with nVIDIA having better performance but at the cost of power savings, whereas AMD can offer a card that may not be as fast but has a TDP about half of a Tesla card.  Software is also a major player in this drama, with nVIDIA's closed source but provably powerful CUDA versus the open sourced OpenCL promoted by AMD and others.  Will AMD bow and license CUDA in a repeat of OpenGL versus DirectX or shall we see a new plot line come out of this clash?  Stay tuned and keep current with our Podcast, your cheat sheet to the wild world of tech.

"GRAPHICS CARDS are no longer just graphics cards thanks to Nvidia, but the firm that brought graphics chips to the server room is for the first time about to face some serious competition.

In the past five years we here at The INQUIRER have called Nvidia many things, however the accolade of high performance computing (HPC) innovator is also applicable. The company's focus on producing general purpose graphics processing units (GPGPUs) has lowered the cost barrier to HPC, allowing small companies, researchers and even hobbyists access to serious computing power."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer

The iFrame strikes again; careful where you log in

Subject: General Tech | August 17, 2010 - 11:43 AM |

iFrames are a tried and true way of delivering nastiness to your machine while you browse the web.  The newest trick that the sne'er-do-wells have learned is to bypass the defence that Firefox uses against misleading and obfuscated URLs by using an iFrame to load the page.  No fix is available as of yet so you might want to be extra careful entering your personal data and logging into sites you'd rather not let others have access to.  On the plus side there is

Source: Slashdot

Of coeurs and cores: SandyBridge info leaks

Subject: General Tech | August 16, 2010 - 02:51 PM |

The Inquirer spotted a French website, fired up their translator and stumbled upon what could be a leaked roadmap from Intel describing their SandyBridge plans for 2011.  With 19 models this lineup will have quite a bit of variety to it, with dual and quad core models being released.  For now the naming scheme remains the same with i7 and i5 filling the top roles and sporting Turboboost and the i3 models lacking that feature and coming only in dual core parts.  Even

Source: The Inquirer

Make your own luck this Friday the 13th

Subject: General Tech | August 13, 2010 - 04:28 PM |

On the forums one of the most common types of advice you will get is to back up your files, preferably multiple times as losing data is not fun.  There are a variety of ways to do that, from online storage like Carbonite who we talk about on the PC Perspective Podcast at least once an episode, to the variety of ways suggested to this forum user.  The bottom line is that no matter that a hard drive has never died on you in the past, they do all die e