An MMO for tankers

Subject: General Tech | August 18, 2010 - 12:39 PM |
Tagged:

The new game World of Tanks sounded to Gaming Heaven to likely be an intricate tank simulator with complexity on the level of a Jane's Aircraft Sim, so when they realized the tank was controlled via WASD and the mouse they were quite taken aback.  Their preconceptions couldn't be further from the truth, this is more of an MMO with a bit of RPG elements and a whole bunch of HE shells.  In one case they saw about 60 tanks running amok blowing each other to Kingdom Come.  Their were a few balance issues in the preview that they tried

As The GPGPU Turns, the soap opera for geeks

Subject: General Tech | August 18, 2010 - 12:05 PM |
Tagged:

As a group, geeks get excited over things that tend to leave the rest of the population scratching their heads in confusion but only because they can't follow what is being discussed.  Take for instance Josh's excitement at getting an inside scoop on the saga of BFG, Best Buy and AMD and the licensing agreement that is tearing them apart. 

As interesting as that information is it is a subplot in our serial, the main thread is the emergence of GPGPU's and the drama of AMD and nVIDIA.  The Inquirer takes a long look at what the market is currently like, as we have new Fermi based Tesla HPC cards coming from nVIDIA and AMD's Firestream series has recently had an update as well.  The hardware is certainly one aspect of our plot, with nVIDIA having better performance but at the cost of power savings, whereas AMD can offer a card that may not be as fast but has a TDP about half of a Tesla card.  Software is also a major player in this drama, with nVIDIA's closed source but provably powerful CUDA versus the open sourced OpenCL promoted by AMD and others.  Will AMD bow and license CUDA in a repeat of OpenGL versus DirectX or shall we see a new plot line come out of this clash?  Stay tuned and keep current with our Podcast, your cheat sheet to the wild world of tech.

"GRAPHICS CARDS are no longer just graphics cards thanks to Nvidia, but the firm that brought graphics chips to the server room is for the first time about to face some serious competition.

In the past five years we here at The INQUIRER have called Nvidia many things, however the accolade of high performance computing (HPC) innovator is also applicable. The company's focus on producing general purpose graphics processing units (GPGPUs) has lowered the cost barrier to HPC, allowing small companies, researchers and even hobbyists access to serious computing power."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer

The iFrame strikes again; careful where you log in

Subject: General Tech | August 17, 2010 - 11:43 AM |
Tagged:

iFrames are a tried and true way of delivering nastiness to your machine while you browse the web.  The newest trick that the sne'er-do-wells have learned is to bypass the defence that Firefox uses against misleading and obfuscated URLs by using an iFrame to load the page.  No fix is available as of yet so you might want to be extra careful entering your personal data and logging into sites you'd rather not let others have access to.  On the plus side there is

Source: Slashdot

Of coeurs and cores: SandyBridge info leaks

Subject: General Tech | August 16, 2010 - 02:51 PM |
Tagged:

The Inquirer spotted a French website, fired up their translator and stumbled upon what could be a leaked roadmap from Intel describing their SandyBridge plans for 2011.  With 19 models this lineup will have quite a bit of variety to it, with dual and quad core models being released.  For now the naming scheme remains the same with i7 and i5 filling the top roles and sporting Turboboost and the i3 models lacking that feature and coming only in dual core parts.  Even

Source: The Inquirer

Make your own luck this Friday the 13th

Subject: General Tech | August 13, 2010 - 04:28 PM |
Tagged:

On the forums one of the most common types of advice you will get is to back up your files, preferably multiple times as losing data is not fun.  There are a variety of ways to do that, from online storage like Carbonite who we talk about on the PC Perspective Podcast at least once an episode, to the variety of ways suggested to this forum user.  The bottom line is that no matter that a hard drive has never died on you in the past, they do all die e

Waiting until Q4 for AMD's 6000 series

Subject: General Tech | August 12, 2010 - 11:28 AM |
Tagged:

DigiTimes picked up some information today that might make a few people holding off on an upgrade a little sadder.  The rumours we'd heard placed the availability of HD6000 cards in the fall but it seems that we will be waiting until November before we get to purchase AMD's next generation of GPUs.  The story, if true is a little convoluted; originally codenamed North Islands, these cards were to be built on a 32nm process by TSMC until TSMC decided to skip 32nm and go from 40nm straight to 28nm.  AMD didn't feel confident about jumping into the new process and Global Foundries

Source: Digitimes

Razer keeps pumping out the mice and pads

Subject: General Tech | August 11, 2010 - 01:05 PM |
Tagged:

Sold separately and reviewed together by Bjorn3D, the Razer Imperator mouse and Vespula
dual sided mouse mat
do seem a good pairing.  The mouse keeps with Razer's tradition of sensitive sensors, 5600DPI this time, and the mat not only provides a smooth surface it also comes with a gel wrist rest.  Apart from the

Source: Bjorn3D

Just ... one more ... turn ... I promise

Subject: General Tech | August 11, 2010 - 12:06 PM |
Tagged:

Civilization is coming back, so if some of your acquaintances
suddenly disappear Sept.

Source: Extremetech

Wireless tire sensors a little too convenient

Subject: General Tech | August 11, 2010 - 11:34 AM |
Tagged:

Having your car tell you when your tire pressure is low is a rather handy little feature and saves you from having to bend over slightly on the odd occasion to do a visual inspection.  That convenience needs to be balanced with security, as tends to be necessary.  It seems that the wireless signal that the tires send to the car's processor every 60-90 seconds can be used to hack into the electronic control units of various systems on the car ranging from the windshield wipers to the brakes.  Some of the hacks can be simply annoying, turning on a variety of warning lights or star

Source: Ars Technica