Landlocked Homeworld; a glimpse at Kharak

Subject: General Tech | January 27, 2016 - 01:47 PM |
Tagged: gaming, Homeworld, Deserts of Kharak

The newest Homeworld game is a prequel covering how the fractious clans of Kharak fought over an ancient relic found in the deserts of their dying world, presumably the Mothership of the two previous Homeworld games.  From the trailers and descriptions provided in this Rock, Paper, SHOTGUN article the game will play very similarly to Homeworld, most of your assets will be restricted to hugging the ground but their is evidence of vertical terrain, flying units and perhaps even orbital units.  In exchange for that your carrier, the replacement Mothership in this game, it is mobile and heavily armed and so will play a big role in your strategy.  Read on to learn more about the game right here.

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"Homeworld: Deserts of Kharak [official site] is a prequel to the legendary Homeworld space real-time strategy games, but this time – heresy! – set on land, as the Kushan race battle angry clans to reclaim ancient technologies found on the sandy planet they currently call home."

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Ever been so sick of a song you considered veering off the road to make it stop?

Subject: General Tech | January 27, 2016 - 01:24 PM |
Tagged: Usenix Enigma, security, iot

The good news is that this particular bug has been addressed but it does not make the vulnerability any less terrifying.  A mere 18 seconds of playtime on a compromised audio CD in your car is enough to insert the attack code and gain complete control over your cars computer controlled systems.  This particular vulnerability was discovered in 2010, long before the more recent vulnerabilities you would have seen all over various media.  You could shut off the engines, forcibly unlock the doors, interfere with steering and many other functions that could well cause serious damage at highway speeds or in other scenarios. 

When placing the blame, The Inquirer makes sure to point out that you should not look to the car companies as it is the software providers who are the source of the problem.  Thanks to various corporate policies no car company has access to all of the source code running in their products so a security audit will not help.  Even better is the inclusion of a government-mandated OBD-II port which allows complete control over your cars system; which you should not touch as simply plugging into it would be a crime in the USA.  There is some good news, this vulnerability resulted in Fiat Chrysler recalling 1.4 million cars at a cost of about a quarter of a billion dollars ... an expensive mistake that may convince them to change their software implementation processes.

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"The modern car's operating system is such a mess that researchers were once able to get complete control of a vehicle by playing a song laced with malicious code. Malware encoded in the track was executed after the file was loaded from a CD and processed by a buggy parser."

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Source: The Register
Author:
Manufacturer: Dell

Overview

Dell has never exactly been a brand that gamers gravitate towards. While we have seen some very high quality products out of Dell in the past few years, including the new XPS 13, and people have loved their Ultrasharp monitor line, neither of these target gamers directly. Dell acquired Alienware in 2006 in order to enter the gaming market and continues to make some great products, but they retain the Alienware branding. It seems to me a gaming-centric notebook with just the Dell brand could be a hard sell.

However, that's exactly what we have today with the Dell Inspiron 15 7000. Equipped with an Intel Core i5-6300HQ and NVIDIA GTX 960M for $799, has Dell created a contender in the entry-level gaming notebook race?

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For years, the Inspiron line has been Dell's entry level option for notebooks and subsequently has a questionable reputation as far as quality and lifespan. With the Inspiron 15 7000 being the most expensive product offering in the Inspiron line though, I was excited to see if it could sway my opinion of the brand.

Click here to continue reading about the Dell Inspiron 15 7000!

New, from the company that brought you SuperFish ...

Subject: General Tech | January 26, 2016 - 12:13 PM |
Tagged: security, Lenovo, idiots

Lenovo chose the third most popular password of 2015 to secure its ShareIT for Windows application and for bonus points have made it hard coded, which there is utterly no excuse for in this day and age.  If you aren't familiar with the software, it is another Dropbox type app which allows you to share files and folders, apparently with anyone now that this password ridiculousness has been exposed.  As you read on at The Inquirer the story gets even better, files are transferred in the clear without any encryption and it even creates an open WiFi hotspot for you, to make sharing your files even easier for all and sundry.  There are more than enough unintentional vulnerabilities in software and hardware, we really don't need companies programming them in on purpose.  If you have ShareIT, you should probably DumpIT.

***Update***

We received word that there is an updated version of ShareIT available for those who do use the app and would like to continue to do so.

They can also access the latest versions which are posted and available for download on the Lenovo site. The updated Android version of SHAREit is also available for download on the Google Play store. Please visit the Lenovo security advisory page for the latest information and updates: (https://support.lenovo.com/us/en/product_security/len_4058)

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"HOLY COW! Lenovo may have lost its mind. The firm has created vulnerabilities in ShareIT that could be exploited by anyone who can guess that '12345678' could be a password."

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Source: The Inquirer

Have you tried the Steam Controller yet?

Subject: General Tech | January 25, 2016 - 01:27 PM |
Tagged: input, Steam Controller

The claims seem suspect; how exactly can a Steam Controller replace a mouse and keyboard when gaming?  That suspicion is being tested over at The Tech Report who recently tried out Valve's new Steam Controller, comparing it not only to a standard PC input setup but also to a XBox controller.  For the test they used Rocket League, Team Fortress 2, Just Cause 3, and Helldivers with mixed results.  In the end the Steam Controller was just not as useful as the Logitech M570 trackball, wireless keyboard, and Xbox 360 controller the reviewer is used to.  That said, with a lot of practice and time spent tweaking your input profiles you could find the Steam Controller is for you ... if you want it.

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"Valve's Steam Controller is supposed to obviate the mouse and keyboard for PC gaming in the living room. We put our thumbs on the Steam Controller's twin trackpads and took it for a spin to see whether it does the job."

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Make yourself a WiFi camera remote

Subject: General Tech | January 25, 2016 - 12:40 PM |
Tagged: wifi, camera, DIY, iot

Hack a Day has posted a perfect example of how inexpensive and easy it is to build yourself useful things instead of shopping for expensive electronics.  If you have looked at the prices of cameras or adapters which allow you to wirelessly take a picture you have probably been disappointed, but you don't have to stay that way.  Instead, take an existing manual remote trigger, add in a WiFi enabled SoC module like the ESP8266 suggested in the video, download and compile the code and the next thing you know you will have a camera with wireless focus and shutter trigger.  Not too shabby for a ~$5 investment.

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"It’s just ridiculous how cheap and easy it is to do some things today that were both costly and difficult just two or three years ago. Case in point: Hackaday.io user [gamaral] built a WiFi remote control for his Canon E3 camera out of just three parts"

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Source: Hack a Day
Author:
Subject: General Tech
Manufacturer: Logitech G

My new desk mate

Earlier this month at the 2016 edition of the Consumer Electronics Show, Logitech released a new product for the gaming market that might have gone unnoticed by some. The G502 Proteus Spectrum is a new gaming mouse that takes an amazing product and makes it just a little better with the help of some RGB goodness. The G502 Proteus Core has been around for a while now and has quickly become one of the best selling gaming mice on Amazon, a testament to its quality and popularity. (It has been as high as #1 overall in recent days.)

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We have been using the G502 Proteus Core in our gaming test beds at the office for some months and during that time I often lamented about how I wanted to upgrade the mouse on my own desk to one. While I waited for myself stop being lazy and not just switching one for the G402 currently in use at my workstation, Logitech released the new G502 Proteus Spectrum and handed me a sample at CES to bring home. Perfect!

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  Logitech G502 Proteus Spectrum Specifications
Resolution 200 - 12,000 DPI
Max Acceleration >40G
Max Speed >300 IPS
USB Data 16 bits/axis
USB Report Rate 1000 Hz (1 ms)
Processor 32-bit ARM
Button rating 20 million clicks
Feet rating 250 kilometers
Price $79 - Amazon.com

The G502 Proteus Spectrum is very similar to the Core model, with the only difference being the addition of an RGB light under the G logo and DPI resolution indicators. This allows you to use the Logitech Gaming Software to customize its color, its pattern (breathing, still or rotating) as well as pair it up and sync with the RGB lights of other Logitech accessories you might have. If you happen to own a Logitech G910 or G410 keyboard, or one of the new headsets (G633/933) then you'll quickly find yourself in color-coordinated heaven.

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In the box you'll find the mouse, attached to a lengthy cable that works great even with my standing desk, and a set of five weights that you can install on the bottom if you like a heavier feel to your mousing action. I installed as many as I could under the magnetic door on the underside of the mouse and definitely prefer it. The benefit of the weights (as opposed to just a heavier mouse out of the box) is that users can customize it as they see fit.

Continue reading our short review of the Logitech G502 Proteus Spectrum mouse!!

If want great audio and don't care about the price; HiFiMAN HE-1000

Subject: General Tech | January 22, 2016 - 01:47 PM |
Tagged: hifiman, headphones, HE-1000, audio

HiFiMAN have been producing mid level and high end audio products for quite some time, straddling the line between affordable and audiophile quality.  The HE-1000 are of the aforementioned audiophile level, at $3000 you really have to have discerning ears to want to pick up these cans.  The headset is quite pretty, built with leather, wood, and aluminium with soft cloth for the earcups and a window blind design on the exterior which HiFiMAN claims has a positive effect on the audio quality.  techPowerUp tested these headphones out, you can read the description of their experience in the audio soundstage these headphones create in their review ... or not.

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"HiFiMAN is constantly developing their planar technology, and today, we will take a look at their latest state-of-the-art headphone. It is dubbed the HE-1000 and features a nanometer thick diaphragm, leather headband, and milled aluminum. We take HiFiMAN's most audacious and pricey headphone for a ride!"

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Source: techPowerUp

Cortana, where is my app?

Subject: General Tech | January 22, 2016 - 12:15 PM |
Tagged: microsoft, Windows Store, windows 10

If the complaints of the developers in this story over at The Register are accurate then the problem with the Windows Store might not be that there are no good apps but instead that you simply can't find them.  If a developer can't find their own app in the store using keywords in the title or description or even the ones they submitted to the store then how can you expect to?  If the only good way to find an app is to know its exact name, how many apps are there in the store that no one but the developer has even seen?  It is still possible that an improved search function will not help the Windows Store but at this point its reputation could not get all that much worse.

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"Looking at the developer forums though, it seems that official guidance and assistance for this issue is not easy to find, which will not help Microsoft in its efforts to establish a strong Windows 10 app ecosystem."

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Source: The Register

Crystal Dynamics Reveals Minimum Specifications for Rise of the Tomb Raider on the PC

Subject: General Tech | January 22, 2016 - 02:06 AM |
Tagged: tomb raider, pc gaming, min specs, can it run

Crystal Dynamics has revealed the minimum system requirements for Rise of the Tomb Raider on PC. This latest Lara Croft adventure sees the ever-resilient tomb raider following in the footsteps of her father in search of an artifact said to grant immortality amidst the lost city of Kitezh. Fortunately for gamers, Rise of the Tomb Raider has quite a low bar for entry with modest minimum system requirements. You will need more powerful hardware than its 2013 predecessor (Tomb Raider), but it is still quite manageable.

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PC gamers will need a 64-bit version of Windows, a dual core Intel Core i3-2100 (2 core, 4 thread at 3.1 GHz) or, for example, AMD FX 4100 processor, 6 GB of system memory, 25 GB of storage space for all the game files, and, of course, a graphics card with 2 GB of video memory such as the NVIDIA GTX 650 or AMD Radeon HD7770. Naturally, hardware with higher specifications/capabilities will get you better performance and visuals, but the above is what you will need to play.

Minimum PC System Requirements:

  • Dual Core Processor (e.g. Core i3-2100 or FX 4100)
  • 6 GB RAM
  • 25 GB Available Storage Space
  • 2 GB Graphics Card (e.g. GTX 650 or Radeon HD7770)

For those curious, Tomb Raider (2013) required XP SP3 32-bit, a dual core Intel Core 2 Duo E6300 or Athlon 64 X2 4050+ CPU, 1 GB of RAM (2 GB for Vista), and an NVIDIA 8600 or AMD HD2600 XT GPU with 512MB of video memory.

Rise of the Tomb Raider will reportedly add new stealth and crafting components along with new weapons and options for close quarters combat. Further, the game will feature day and night cycles with realistic weather which should make for cold snow-filled nights in Siberia as well as opportunities to sneak up on unwitting guards freezing their buns off!

The game is set to release on January 28th for the PC and joins the the Xbox One version that launched back in November 2015 where it will be a timed exclusive (it will come to the PS4 later this year).

Personally, I am excited for this game. I picked up its predecessor during a Steam sale for super cheap only to let it sit in my inventory for about a year. It was one of those 'I'll play it eventually, but it's not really a priority' things where the price finally got me (heh). Little did I know how wrong I was, because once I finally got around to firing up the game, I played it near constantly until I beat it! It was a surprisingly fun reboot of the series, and I am hopeful that RofTR will be more of the same! 

Source: Bit-Tech