Subject: General Tech
Manufacturer: Microsoft

It could be a good... start.

So this is what happens when you install pre-release software on a production machine.

Sure, I only trusted it as far as a second SSD with Windows 7 installed, but it would be fair to say that I immersed myself in the experience. It was also not the first time that I evaluated upcoming Microsoft OSes on my main machine, having done the same for Windows Vista and Windows 7 as both were in production. Windows 8 was the odd one out, which was given my laptop. In this case, I was in the market for a new SSD and was thus willing to give it a chance, versus installing Windows 7 again.

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So far, my experience has been roughly positive. The first two builds have been glitchy. In the first three days, I have rebooted my computer more times than I have all year (which is about 1-2 times per month). It could be the Windows Key + Arrow Key combinations dropping randomly, Razer Synapse deciding to go on strike a couple of times until I reinstall it, the four-or-so reboots required to install a new build, and so forth. You then also have the occasional issue of a Windows service (or DWM.exe) deciding that it would max out a core or two.

But it is pre-release software! That is all stuff to ignore. The only reason I am even mentioning it is so people do not follow in my footsteps and install it on their production machines, unless they are willing to have pockets of downtime here or there. Even then, the latest build, 9879, has been fairly stable. It has been installed all day and has not given me a single issue. This is good, because it is the last build we will get until 2015.

What we will not ignore is the features. For the first two builds, it was annoying to use with multiple monitors. Supposedly to make it easier to align items, mouse cursors would remain locked inside each monitor's boundary until you provide enough velocity to have it escape to the next one. This was the case with Windows 8.1 as well, but you were given registry entries to disable the feature. Those keys did not work with Windows 10. But, with Build 9879, that seems to have been disabled unless you are currently dragging a window. In this case, a quick movement would pull windows between monitors, while a slow movement would perform a Snap.

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This is me getting ready to snap a window on the edge between two monitors with just my mouse.

In a single build, they turned this feature from something I wanted to disable, to something that actually performs better (in my opinion) than Windows 7. It feels great.

Now on to a not-so-pleasant experience: updating builds.

Simply put, you can click "Check Now" and "Download Update" all that you want, but it will just sit there doing nothing until it feels like it. During the update from 9860 to 9879, I was waiting with the PC Settings app open for three hours. At some point, I got suspicious and decided to monitor network traffic: nothing. So I did the close app, open app, re-check dance a few times, and eventually gave up. About a half of an hour after I closed PC Settings the last time, my network traffic spiked to the maximum that my internet allows, which task manager said was going to a Windows service.

Shortly after, I was given the option to install the update. After finishing what I was doing, I clicked the install button and... it didn't seem to do anything. After about a half of an hour, it prompted me to restart my computer with a full screen message that you cannot click past to save your open windows - it is do it or postpone it one or more hours, there is no in-between. About another twenty minutes (and four-or-five reboots) after I chose to reboot, I was back up and running.

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Is that okay? Sure. When you update, you clearly need to do stuff and that could take your computer several minutes. It would be unrealistic to complain about a 20-minute install. The only real problem is that it waits for extended periods of time doing nothing (measured, literally nothing) until it decides that the time is right, and that time is NOW! It may have been three hours after you originally cared, but the time is NOW!

Come on Microsoft, let us know what is going on behind the scenes, and give us reliable options to pause or suspend the process before the big commitment moments.

So that is where I am, one highly positive experience and one slightly annoying one. Despite my concerns about Windows Store (which I have discussed at length in the past and are still valid) this operating system seems to be on a great path. It is a work in progress. I will keep you up to date, as my machine is kept up to date.

When your Brown bottoms out too easily, WASD Keyboards CODE with Cherry MX Clear

Subject: General Tech | November 13, 2014 - 06:09 PM |
Tagged: Cherry MX clear, WASD Keyboards, CODE, input, mechanical keyboard, tenkeyless

Scott posted about the WASD Keyboards CODE with Cherry MX Clear switches but until now we have not found a review of this keyboard.  The Tech Report has changed that with this review which takes a look at the new type of switch which sits between the Brown and the Green, Clear switches need more force to bottom out that a Brown but not as much as the clicky style Green switches.  That is not all this tenkeyless board offers, there are LEDs that can be activated by the dip switches in the recess found on the back of the keyboard.  In fact those dip switches can do more than just enable a nice glow, you can disable the Windows key or even immediately switch to different layouts such as Mac, Dvorak, and Colemak though sadly they left Sinclair ZX off of the list.  If this type of switch interests your fingers and you are willing to spend $150 on a keyboard check out the full review here.

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"We've been meaning to try out Cherry MX's clear key switches for a while, and now, we've finally gotten our wish. Join us for a look at WASD Keyboards' Cherry MX clear-infused Code keyboard, a tenkeyless offering with more than a few tricks up its sleeve."

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Podcast #326 - Intel's Core M 5Y70, Assassin's Creed Unity, Intel P3500 and more!

Subject: General Tech | November 13, 2014 - 03:19 PM |
Tagged: podcast, video, Intel, core m, core m 5y70, Broadwell, broadwell-y, Lenovo, yoga 2 pro, yoga 3 pro, assasins creed unity, ubisoft, farcry 4, p3500, gskill blade

PC Perspective Podcast #326 - 11/13/2014

Join us this week as we discuss Intel's Core M 5Y70, Assassin's Creed Unity, Intel P3500 and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

  • iTunes - Subscribe to the podcast directly through the iTunes Store
  • RSS - Subscribe through your regular RSS reader
  • MP3 - Direct download link to the MP3 file

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, and Allyn Malventano

Subscribe to the PC Perspective YouTube Channel for more videos, reviews and podcasts!!

 

Oh no, there goes the University of Tokyo! Go, go Gojira!

Subject: General Tech | November 13, 2014 - 01:39 PM |
Tagged: cycle computing, supercomputer, gojira, bargain

While the new Gojira supercomputer is not more powerful than the University of Tokyo's Oakleaf-FX at 1 petaflop of performance if you look at it from a price to performance ratio the $5,500 Gojira is more than impressive.  It has a peak theoretical performance of 729 teraflops by using over 71,000 Ivy Bridge cores across several Amazon Web Service regions and providing the equivalent of 70.75 years of compute time.  The cluster was built in an incredibly short time, going from zero to 50,000 cores in 23 minutes and hitting the peak after 60 minutes.  You won't be playing AC Unity on it any time soon but if you want to rapidly test virtual prototypes these guys can do it for an insanely low price.  Catch more at The Register and ZDNet, the Cycle Computing page seems to be down for the moment.

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"Cycle Computing has helped hard drive giant Western Digital shove a month's worth of simulations into eight hours on Amazon cores."

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Source: The Register

Visual Studio Community 2013 Announced

Subject: General Tech | November 12, 2014 - 07:38 PM |
Tagged: visual studio, microsoft

While this is significantly different from what we usually write about, I have a feeling that there is some overlap with our audience.

Update: If you use Visual Studio Express 2013, you may wish to uninstall it before installing Community. My experience seems to be that it thinks that both are installed to the same directory, and so uninstalling Express after installing Community will break both. I am currently repairing Community, which should fix it, but there's no sense for you to install twice if you know better.

Visual Studio Express has been the free, cut-down option for small and independent software developers. It can be used for commercial applications, but it was severely limited in many areas, such as its lack of plug-in support. Today, Microsoft announced Visual Studio Community 2013, which is a free version of Visual Studio that is equivalent to Visual Studio Professional 2013 for certain users (explained below). According to TechCrunch, while Visual Studio Express will still be available for download, Community is expected to be the version going forward.

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Image Credit: Wikimedia (modified)

There are four use cases for Visual Studio Community 2013:

  • To contribute to open-source projects (unlimited users)
  • To use in a classroom environment for learning (unlimited users)
  • To use as a tool for Academic research (unlimited users)
  • To create free or commercial, closed-source applications (up to 5 users)
    • You must be an individual or small studio with less than 250 PCs
    • You must have no more than $1 million USD in yearly revenue

Honestly, this is a give-and-take scenario, but it seems generally positive. I can see this being problematic for small studios with 6+ developers, but they can (probably) still use Visual Studio Express 2013 Update 3 until it gets too old. For basically everyone else, this means that you do not need to worry about technical restrictions when developing software. This opens the avenue for companies like NVIDIA (Nsight Visual Studio Edition) and Epic Games (Unreal Engine 4) to deliver their plug-ins to the independent developer community. When I get a chance, and after it finishes installing, I will probably check to see if those examples already work.

Visual Studio Community 2013 Update 4 is available now at Microsoft's website.

Source: Microsoft

Roccat Kave XTD 5.1 Digital, seriously loud surround sound

Subject: General Tech | November 12, 2014 - 06:09 PM |
Tagged: audio, roccat, Kave XTD 5.1, gaming headset

The name implies that the Roccat Kave XTD 5.1 Digital headset provides virtual surround sound but in fact it has three 40mm driver units in each earcup, giving you front, rear and centre channels though you can use the provided software to switch to stereo sound if you prefer.  The earcups are leather over foam which makes them quite comfortable although they could get warm after extended periods of time and the microphone boom is removable for when it would be in your way.  They also have noise cancellation and the ability to pair with a phone over Bluetooth and an integrated sound card, all part of the reason that the headset is $150.  Modders-Inc were impressed by that soundcards four speaker plugs on the rear allowing you to switch between sending 5.1 signal to the Kave XTD or to external speakers.  Audio reviews are always very subjective as it is difficult to rate perceived sound quality for anyone but yourself but you should still check out Modders-Inc's take on the software and hardware in their full review.

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"Overall I thought the Roccat Kave XTD 5.1 Digital headset is a solid performer. The audio quality from the headset is excellent. At just slightly under full volume the headset is LOUD!"

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Source: Modders Inc

CS:GO and TF2 on Linux and Radeon

Subject: General Tech | November 12, 2014 - 05:10 PM |
Tagged: linux, amd, radeon, CS:GO, tf2

With the new driver from AMD and a long list of cards to test, from an R9290 all the way back to an HD4650, Phoronix has put together a rather definitive list of the current performance you can expect from CS:GO and TF2.  CS:GO was tested at 2560x1600 and showed many performance changes from the previous driver, including some great news for 290 owners.  TF2 was tested at the same resolution and many of the GPUs were capable of providing 60FPS or higher, again with the 290 taking the lead.  Phoronix also did testing on the efficiency of these cards, detailing the number of frames per second, per watt used, this may not be pertinent to many users but does offer an interesting look at the efficiency of the GPUs.  If you are gaming on a Radeon on Linux now is a good time to upgrade your drivers and associated programs.

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"The latest massive set of Linux test data we have to share with Linux gamers and enthusiasts is a look at Counter-Strike: Global Offensive and Team Fortress 2 when using the very newest open-source Radeon graphics driver code. The very latest open-source Radeon driver code tested with these popular Valve Linux games were the Linux 3.18 Git kernel, Mesa 10.4-devel, LLVM 3.6 SVN, and xf86-video-ati 7.5.99."

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Source: Phoronix

Browse the web with your Oculus and MozVR

Subject: General Tech | November 12, 2014 - 04:54 PM |
Tagged: mozilla, oculus rift, MozVR

You have been able to browse the web on your Oculus Rift since the first dev kit, but not with a UI designed specifically for the VR device.  MozVR is in development along with a specific version of Firefox or Chromium to allow Oculus users to browse the web in a new way.  It will work with both Mac and Windows, though as of yet there is no mention of Linux support which should change in the near future.  You need to get your hands on an Oculus to try out the new browser, it simply is not going to translate to the desktop.  The software is open sourced and available on Github so you can contribute to the overall design of the new way to surf the web as well as optimizing your own site for VR.  Check out more on MozVR and Oculus over at The Inquirer.

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"MOZILLA IS CONTINUING its 10th birthday celebrations with the launch of a virtual reality (VR) website."

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Source: The Inquirer

Far Cry 4 Will Require Modest PC Hardware and Newer Operating Systems

Subject: General Tech | November 12, 2014 - 04:07 AM |
Tagged: system requirements, pc gaming, kyrat, fps, far cry 4

In case you missed it earlier this week, Ubisoft revealed the PC system requirements needed to run Far Cry 4. Developed by Ubisoft Montreal and set to release on November 18th, Far Cry 4 is the latest action adventure FPS in the Far Cry series. The game uses Ubisoft's Dunia Engine II which is a heavily modified game engine originally based on Crytek's CryEngine 1 developed by Kirmaan Aboobaker. The player is a Nepalese native that returns to Kyrat, a fictional location in the Himalayas following the death of their mother only to become embroiled in a civil war taking place in an open world filled with enemies, weapons, animals, and did I mention weapons?

Far Cry 4 Kyrat Bow and Arrow.jpg

This bow is a far cry from the only weapon you'll have access to...

According to the developer, Far Cry 4 continues the tradition of an open world environment, but the game world has been tweaked from the Far Cry 3 experience to be a tighter and more story focused experience where the single player story will take precedence over exploration and romps across the mountainous landscape.

While I can not comment on how the game plays, it certainly looks quite nice, and will need a beefy modern PC to run at its maximum settings. Interestingly, the game seems to scale down decently as well, with the entry level computer needed to run Far Cry 4 being rather modest.

No matter the hardware level, only 64-bit operating systems need apply, Far Cry 4 requires the 64-bit version of Windows 7 or later to run. At a minimum, Ubisoft recommends a quad core processor (Intel i5 750 or AMD Phenom II X4 955), 4GB of memory, a Radeon 5850 or GTX 460, and 30GB of storage.

To get optimal settings, users will need twice the system memory (at least 8GB) and video memory (at least 2GB), a newer quad core CPU such as the Intel i5-2400S or AMD FX-8350, and a modern NVIDIA GTX 680 or AMD Radeon R9 290X graphics card.

Far Cy 4 Mortar.jpg

Anything beyond that is gravy that will allow gamers to crank up the AA and AF as well as the resolution.

Far Cry 4 will be available in North America on November 18, 2014 for the PC, PS4, Xbox One, PS3, and Xbox 360. Following the North America release, the game is scheduled to launch in Europe and Australia on November 20th, and in Japan on January 22 of next year.

Source: Maximum PC

Final Fantasy XIII-2 Dated for December 11th

Subject: General Tech | November 12, 2014 - 03:23 AM |
Tagged: pc gaming, final fantasy xiii-2, final fantasy xiii, final fantasy

It seems like Square Enix has paid attention to the criticism about Final Fantasy XIII. While it would have been nice for them to go back and fix the problems for the original game (Update Nov 12 @ 5:35pm EST: They are, in early December - Thanks TimeKeeper in the comments), it looks like the sequel, XIII-2, will behave more like a PC title. First and foremost, it will not be locked to 720p and it is said to offer other graphics options. The sequel is scheduled to launch on December 11th for $20, or $18 USD on pre-order (a few dollars above the launch price for Final Fantasy 13).

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Of course, it is somewhat disappointing that screen resolution, a 60FPS cap, and graphics options are considered features, but the platform is unfamiliar to certain parts of the company. Acknowledging their error and building a better, but probably still below expectations, product is a good direction. Hopefully they will continue to progress, and eventually make PC games with the best of them. Either that, or they have a talk with their Eidos arm about borrowing Nixxes, a company that specializes in enhancing games on the PC.

Final Fantasy XIII-2 is coming to Steam in a month for $20 USD. The third installment, Lightning Returns, will arrive sometime in 2015.

Source: Steam