If you really don't want to upgrade to Windows 10 ...

Subject: General Tech | January 8, 2016 - 01:21 PM |
Tagged: microsoft, windows 10

There are those who are not interested in upgrading to Windows 10 from 7 or 8.x and they offer a variety of reasons as to why they will not.  Recently two objections have been resolved, with the newest Media Creation Tool from Microsoft you are now able to do a clean install, using your Win7/8.x key during the installation process.  As well Scott has shown how you can force a roll-back if you encounter difficulties after the upgrade.

If you still have no interest in the new OS, then take a gander at these tips from The Register which will disable those annoying popups.  By making these changes to the registry you will retain the ability to recieve updates via Microsoft Update, you just will not see the nag screen asking you to upgrade to Win10.  They also mention a way to stop the update files from being downloaded.  You can also just choose to ignore this until Microsoft's stated deadline of  July, at which point the popup should disappear as well.

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"If you're using a PC running Windows 7 or 8, you may be getting a little sick of endless popup screens telling you to upgrade to version 10. And you may be worried about inadvertently installing the upgrade as part of a security update."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: Slashdot

Is Windows 10 Nagging Actually Getting Worse?

Subject: General Tech | January 8, 2016 - 03:18 AM |
Tagged: microsoft, windows 10

My production machine has been on Windows 10 since the second Insider Preview build, back in 2014. We have a handful of laptops that are on older versions, however. One of them, which runs Windows 8.1, was upgraded to Windows 10 for a few weeks once 1511 landed, but it did not handle the transition well. There was a few nasty glitches, including 100% screen brightness for some reason being interpreted as 0% screen brightness, making the display turn off when I plugged it in (until I realized what was going on).

No problem, I thought to myself, I will just roll back to Windows 8.1. I gave it a shot.

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That's apparently not good for Microsoft. Windows Update apparently has no record of an upgrade being rolled back, because the first thing it asked me when Windows 8.1 was restore was to upgrade back to Windows 10. Noooooooooooooooo. I will not, Microsoft, at least not until some later service release fixes these issues.

All I could think of is, if these are the problems that I'm having, how are novice users supposed to figure this out. It turns out that Microsoft has added a couple of Windows Registry keys to block the various naggings. Once I set them, the OS didn't complain or try to hide standard Windows Update buttons with Upgrade to Windows 10 ones. Registry keys are definitely not for novice users, but many of our readers should be comfortable with registry editing, and they may know novice users who would like a little help.

ll you need to do is change two keys:

  • HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\WindowsUpdate\OSUpgrade
    • Change or add a DWORD named AllowOSUpgrade with a value of 0
  • HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\GWX
    • Change or add a DWORD named DisableGWX with a value of 1
    • The GWX folder (called a key in the registry) wasn't present. I needed to add it.

After editing the registry and rebooting, everything Windows 10 nag-related was disabled and I could install Windows Updates. Applications exist to set these keys for you, but it's probably better to just do it yourself. The ZDNet article, linked below, also has a few files to automatically apply these registry keys to your system. I like doing these things by hand, though.

Thanks to Ed Bott at ZDNet for making a big write-up about this, just yesterday actually.

Source: ZDNet

CES 2016: New Cooler Master Mechanical Keyboards

Subject: General Tech, Shows and Expos | January 7, 2016 - 11:02 PM |
Tagged: CES, CES 2016, cooler master, mechanical keyboard, RGB LED

Back in September, we mentioned that the CoolerMaster QuickFire XTi was launched worldwide. They have now launched three more keyboards. Two of them have Cherry MX switches and RGB LEDs, while the third uses a supposedly high-quality membrane switch.

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According to The Tech Report at the show, Cooler Master has apparently used their own LED solution, rather than just purchase Cherry MX RGB switches directly. They also say that they needed to change the housing to fit those. The MasterKeys Pro L and S are fairly minimalist keyboards. I assume L stands for long, and S stands for short, because the S is the tenkeyless version of the L (which means it is cut off to the right of the arrow keys).

The Devastator II has switches that Cooler Master calls “Mem-chanical.” They apparently created high-end membrane switches that are supposed to feel like tactile mechanical ones. I guess this means that they were trying to emulate the Cherry MX Brown force curve. This doesn't say what quality the keyboard will end up being, that said, one of the most precise keyboards I've had (according to my straight-edge test) was a Microsoft Media keyboard from the early 2000s.

The Devastator II also has an ambidextrous mouse. Not sure about pricing and availability, though. The Tech Report claims $30, which is right around what the original Devastator costs today.

Coverage of CES 2016 is brought to you by Logitech!

PC Perspective's CES 2016 coverage is sponsored by Logitech.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

CES 2016: Qualcomm Snapdragon 820A SoCs To Drive Future Car PCs

Subject: General Tech, Mobile | January 7, 2016 - 06:55 PM |
Tagged: snapdragon 820A, snapdragon 820, qualcomm, LTE, Kryo, adreno

Qualcomm is branching out with its SoCs to the auto industry with its upcoming line of Snapdragon 820 Automotive processors. The planned Snapdragon 820A and 820Am will begin sampling to auto makers and ODMs within the next few months and are aimed at in-car navigation, entertainment, dash displays, HUDs, and safety/driver assist systems.

Sharing a similar pedigree to the mobile-oriented Snapdragon 820, the new automotive series features Qualcomm's custom 64-bit "Kryo" CPU cores, an Adreno 530 GPU, Hexagon 680 DSP capable of processing up to eight car camera sensors, and 802.11ac Wi-Fi and Bluetooth wireless. The 802Am adds a Snapdragon X12 LTE modem  which supports a maximum of 600 Mbps down and 150 Mbps upload speeds. Both chips are built on a 14nm manufacturing process and reportedly utilize a modular package and chip design that would allow auto manufacturers to save money on development costs of new vehicles by allowing upgraded hardware to be used with minimal software changes being necessary. End users aren't going to benefit from the modular nature, but the companies making the "infotainment" systems and those integrating them into new vehicles will.

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Qualcomm envisions the 820 Automotive processors driving navigation and entertainment systems as well as being used for digital information displays such as dashboard readouts and windshield HUDs. The chips are also capable of limited driver assist functionality, though they won't be powering a self driving car all on their own yet. They can utilize always on sensors to provide collision alerts and 3D navigation that is aware of relative positioning (it can look for stop signs to assist a GPS which might not be accurate enough to tell you to turn at the correct time). Using between four and eight cameras, the 820Am is able to provide lane departure warnings, front collision warnings, traffic sign recognition, and object detection while backing up using machine learning / computer vision. That last bit is apparently powered by a Qualcomm technology called the Zeroth Machine Intelligency Platform.

There are rumors that Qualcomm will not be pursuing it's custom Kryo CPU cores beyond the Snapdragon 820, though I have my doubts that will happen. The higher margins of the auto industry and opportunity to sell even more chips that can be higher clocked may help to justify the higher R&D in the competitive mobile market. I'm interested to see if these once-mobile SoCs can live up to Qualcomm's promises for future vehicle tech.

Coverage of CES 2016 is brought to you by Logitech!

PC Perspective's CES 2016 coverage is sponsored by Logitech.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: Ars Technica

CES 2016: Razer Stargazer Webcam Announced

Subject: General Tech, Shows and Expos | January 7, 2016 - 04:52 PM |
Tagged: CES, CES 2016, razer, razer stargazer, webcam, Intel RealSense

Razer has announced the Stargazer webcam with a few tricks up its sleeve. Each of these has a downside or catch though, so be sure to read my commentary.

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The first advanced feature is the sensor. It supports 1080p output, which is common these days, but it can be driven at 60 FPS when dropped to 720p. For video streamers, who usually shrink their webcam to a fraction of the screen anyway, this bump in refresh rate will match that game or desktop capture. 720p is more resolution than a corner of a 1080p broadcast, so you're throwing out pixels anyway. The problem would be streamers who have a full-screen webcam shot. This is common for educational or discussion-based podcasts, which would likely need to choose between 720p60 or 1080p30. I don't think it's possible for any webcam to output both resolutions at the same time, so you'd need to release and renew the device when you switch, which isn't feasible. That said, I'm not sure if there was a major, technical reason for Razer not just shipping 1080p60. There might be.

The second feature the webcam's inclusion of Intel RealSense. This is their technology for gesture recognition, 3d scanning, and background removal. Having the camera automatically key out the background on webcam video is interesting, and probably quite accurate given that it knows 3D positional data. The ability to 3D scan would also be interesting for game and mod developers. The catch? It apparently requires a sixth-generation Core processor (Skylake). This entirely removes AMD and DDR3-era Intel processors from the equation, including the high-end Core i7-4790k. It also requires Windows 10. Note that Razer lists these requirements for the webcam in general, including the Skylake processor, but it might only apply to RealSense features. It also might apply to everything, though.

If these limitations, including the very high system requirements, don't apply to you, then look for the Razer Stargazer in Q2. It will apparently cost about $200 USD.

Coverage of CES 2016 is brought to you by Logitech!

PC Perspective's CES 2016 coverage is sponsored by Logitech.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: Razer

Square Enix Stops Basing Decision on Puns

Subject: General Tech | January 7, 2016 - 03:13 PM |
Tagged: square enix, shinra, cloud computing

Shinra Technologies was a cloud computing service from Square Enix. Unlike OnLive and PlayStation Now, it wasn't intending to offer existing titles to incompatible devices by hooking input and returning video. They wanted to use this service to create new titles, even with third-parties like Ubisoft, that offload big computational elements to their servers. Those should be latency-insensitive parts, but details would be game dependent of course. This is similar to Microsoft's Xbox program, which is said to power the upcoming game for the Xbox One, Crackdown 3.

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Image Credit: Final Fantasy Wikia

We now say was, because Square Enix killed the program. It was created as a subsidiary to keep it separate from the game development division, which might have given some comfort to third-party developers. It also allowed them to secure funding for the program independently, except that investors did not sign on. Without external capital, Square Enix dissolved the division at a loss of about $17 million USD.

Internet Explorer 8, 9, and 10 Will Be Deprecated on Tuesday

Subject: General Tech | January 7, 2016 - 02:33 PM |
Tagged: microsoft, internet explorer

Microsoft has been talking about moving their web browsers to a different support model. They intend to support only the most recent version of their browser, deprecating everything beforehand. This has two benefits. First, they don't need to port security patches to nearly as many targets. Second, web developers can mostly rely upon recently added features, especially ones which do not require special hardware.

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A major stage in this plan occurs on Tuesday. Microsoft will issue a patch to notify users that their old browsers will no longer receive security updates. They are ripping off the band-aid with this one, deprecating Internet Explorer 8, 9, and 10 simultaneously. Since Internet Explorer 11 is very competitive with Chrome and Firefox in terms of standards support, you will probably hear a few web developers rejoice. Internet Explorer 11 is available for Windows 7 and later.

As a side note, this also means that every supported browser on Windows from Microsoft will be compatible with WebGL. You may not be able to rely upon hardware acceleration, as blacklisted drivers will be forced into a software rendering compatibility mode, but it's good news for Web gaming.

Source: Microsoft

The UHD Alliance finally gets around to creating a standard

Subject: General Tech | January 7, 2016 - 12:16 PM |
Tagged: UHD, 4k

With companies at CES showing off 8K displays it seems that the standards body for UHD felt the need to actually get around to setting a standard for what constitutes a 4K display.   Like USB.org or the IEEE, the UHD Alliance is a body which is supposed to set standards on the various devices we buy so we can know the minimum specifications of the product, unfortunately the UHD Alliance seems to suffer from input lag.  As you would expect, a resolution of 3840 x 2160 is required to bear the "Ultra HD Premium" logo, as well as 10-bit colour and minimum support for colour representation and dynamic range specifications.  The standard applies to both manufacturers and content providers such as Netflix.  You can read more about this slightly tardy standard over at The Register.

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"The UHD Alliance has delivered its promised spec setting down minimum standards for what constitutes 4K. While 4K of some kind has been around for a decade, it was only in 2015 that the industry decided standards were needed."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Register

CES 2016: Monoprice $199 3D Printer, DLP 3D Printer, CNC Mill

Subject: General Tech | January 7, 2016 - 04:19 AM |
Tagged: maker, DLP 3D printer, CNC mill, CES 2016, CES, 3d printer

Monoprice has announced a pair of 3D printers at very aggressive price points, with the $199 Maker Spark 3D Printer and $299 Maker DLP 3D printer, as well as the $999 Maker CNC Mill.

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Monoprice Maker Spark 3D Printer

“Monoprice continues its crusade to bring the maker movement to the masses with the debut of three 3D printers boasting solid constructions, exceptional print quality and easy assembly at prices far below the industry standard. New products include a $199.99 ready-to-print Maker Spark 3D Printer featuring preloaded designs, a $299.99 Maker DLP 3D Printer offering laser printing precision and a $999.99 Maker CNC Mill for printing hard materials like wood and metal”

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Monoprice Maker DLP 3D Printer

These are the lowest prices we’ve seen for products in this category, and Monoprice emphasized that these items are complete and ready to use out of the box.

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Monoprice Maker CNC Mill

Availability for all of the announced Monoprice products is set for Q1 2016.

Coverage of CES 2016 is brought to you by Logitech!

PC Perspective's CES 2016 coverage is sponsored by Logitech.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: Monoprice

CES 2016 Podcast Day 3 - New ROG Monitors, M.2 PCIe Drives, a giant case from EVGA and more!

Subject: General Tech | January 7, 2016 - 02:47 AM |
Tagged: video, ROG, podcast, patriot, nuc, maximus VII, M.2, kingston, Intel, evga, compute stick, CES 2016, CES, asus

CES 2016 Podcast Day 3 - 01/07/16

We wrap up CES 2016 by talking about new ROG monitors from ASUS, Plenty of M.2 PCIe Drives, a giant case from EVGA and more!

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Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Josh Walrath, Allyn Malventano, Ken Addison and Sebastian Peak

Program length: 1:47:01

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