Podcast #369 - Fable Legends DX12 Benchmark, Apple A9 SoC, Intel P3608 SSD, and more!

Subject: General Tech | October 1, 2015 - 02:17 PM |
Tagged: podcast, video, fable legends, dx12, apple, A9, TSMC, Samsung, 14nm, 16nm, Intel, P3608, NVMe, logitech, g410, TKL, nvidia, geforce now, qualcomm, snapdragon 820

PC Perspective Podcast #369 - 10/01/2015

Join us this week as we discuss the Fable Legends DX12 Benchmark, Apple A9 SoC, Intel P3608 SSD, and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

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Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Josh Walrath, Jeremy Hellstrom, and Allyn Malventano

Program length: 1:42:35

  1. Week in Review:
  2. 0:54:10 This episode of PC Perspective is brought to you by…Zumper, the quick and easy way to find your next apartment or home rental. To get started and to find your new home go to http://zumper.com/PCP
  3. News item of interest:
  4. Hardware/Software Picks of the Week:
  5. Closing/outro

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The headphones of choice on Aiur; Corsair's VOID

Subject: General Tech | October 1, 2015 - 01:43 PM |
Tagged: corsair, VOID Wireless, gaming headset, 7.1 headset

On paper these headphones are impressive, wireless performance out to 40' with 16 hours of charge, frequency response of 20Hz to 20kHz on the 50mm drivers and 7.1 surround sound.  There have been many previous software emulated 7.1 directional gaming headsets which have disappointed users but in this case Benchmark Reviews quite liked the performance of the VOID while gaming and listening to music.  The noise cancelling microphone, dubbed an “InfoMic” as it has LED lights which can be illuminated in different ways depending on your preferences and even the game you happen to be playing.  You can also sync the lights with other Corsair RGB devices using the Cue software if you are so inclined.  Check out the full reivew right here.


"In the world of computer peripherals and hardware, most of us are well aware of Corsair’s existence. This is an organization that has well-earned reputation for producing quality components; components that are going to be high-performing, intelligently designed, and very likely to provide its owners with years of service."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Audio Corner


You thought Stagefright was just taking a bow? Surprise! It's an encore.

Subject: General Tech | October 1, 2015 - 12:44 PM |
Tagged: stagefright, security, Android

Assuming you have a carrier with a sense of responsibility and a reasonably modern phone the chances are you are patched against the original Stagefright vulnerability.  This is not the case for the recently reported vulnerabilities dubbed Stagefright 2.0.  If you open a specially and nefariously modified MP3 or MP4 file in Stagefright on Android 5.0+ it has been confirmed that those files can trigger remote code execution via libstagefright.  If you are on an older model then the vulnerability lies in libutils and can be used for the same purpose, gaining access to the data stored on your device.  From the security company reports that The Register has linked, it sounds like we can expect many repeat performances as the Stagefright library was poorly written and contains many mistakes; worse is the fact that it is not sandboxed in any way and has significantly higher access than an application for playing media files should ever have.


"Joshua Drake from the security outfit Zimperium zLabs introduced us to StageFright earlier this summer, and he is now back with a similar warning and a brace of problems, according to a post on the Kaspersky Threatpost news site."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk


Source: The Register
Subject: General Tech
Manufacturer: NVIDIA

Setup, Game Selection

Yesterday NVIDIA officially announced the new GeForce NOW streaming game service, the conclusion to the years-long beta and development process known as NVIDIA GRID. As I detailed on my story yesterday about the reveal, GeForce NOW is a $7.99/mo. subscription service that will offer on-demand, cloud-streamed games to NVIDIA SHIELD devices, including a library of 60 games for that $7.99/mo. fee in addition to 7 titles in the “purchase and play” category. There are several advantages that NVIDIA claims make GeForce NOW a step above any other streaming gaming service including PlayStation Now, OnLive and others. Those include load times, resolution and frame rate, combined local PC and streaming game support and more.


I have been able to use and play with the GeForce NOW service on our SHIELD Android TV device in the office for the last few days and I thought I would quickly go over my initial thoughts and impressions up to this point.

Setup and Availability

If you have an NVIDIA SHIELD Android TV (or a SHIELD Tablet) then the setup and getting started process couldn’t be any simpler for new users. An OS update is pushed that changes the GRID application on your home screen to GeForce NOW and you can sign in using your existing Google account on your Android device, making payment and subscription simple to manage. Once inside the application you can easily browse through the included streaming games or look through the smaller list of purchasable games and buy them if you so choose.


Playing a game is as simple and selecting title from the grid list and hitting play.

Game Selection

Let’s talk about that game selection first. For $7.99/mo. you get access to 60 titles for unlimited streaming. I have included a full list below, originally posted in our story yesterday, for reference.

Continue reading my initial thoughts and an early review of GeForce NOW!!

This mouse goes to 12000! The ROCCAT Nyth

Subject: General Tech | September 30, 2015 - 04:05 PM |
Tagged: roccat, Nyth, gaming mouse, input

That is no typo, the Twin-Tech Laser Sensor R1 on the Nyth really does go all the way up to 12000 DPI and it also has an adjustable lift-off distance.  There are also 18 buttons, with the shift key function they can all be assigned a second function as well.  The Swarm software used to program the mouse is rather impressive, not only can you assign profiles to games you can program a light show into your mouse if you so desire.  It will set you back $120 but if the price tag does not scare you off you can see how it performs in MadShrimps' review.


"ROCCAT Nyth is like a breath of fresh air in the already crowded gaming mice market which sports quite a modular design with replaceable right side panel, no less than four different sets of buttons, a smooth durable plastic texture, catchy LED light effects and a comfortable shape for lengthy gaming sessions."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Mad Shrimps

It won't take skill to play Fallout 4

Subject: General Tech | September 30, 2015 - 02:31 PM |
Tagged: gaming, fallout 4

Fallout 4 is sounding less and less like a Fallout game and more like a game which happens to bear the name Fallout.  Apparently the skill system which has been a core of Fallout is confusing people, although how is unclear and the example given is rather poor “What’s better, the Charisma SPECIAL, or the Speech Skill" considering you can't have more than a 10 Charisma.  Perhaps it is too early to be negative, there will be 70 perks, 10 level for each SPECIAL stat and each perk with five levels to increase their effectiveness.  Your perks are limited by the stat, if you have a Perception of 7 then you will never be able to gain the perks associated with levels 8 and higher, then again if you have a stat of 10 at level 1 nothing is stopping you from starting with a level 10 perk.

There are going to be a lot of differences apparent in Fallout 4 and it will be interesting to see how they effect gameplay.  Excitiment is waning for some long time fans but perhaps for gamers new to the series who are in love with crafting, base management and are easily confused by numbers this will be a perfect introduction to the wasteland.  Follow the link to RPS to see the video explaining the new system.


"Here’s the big news: as many suspected, Skills are indeed gone, with their effects rolled into a bounteous system of perks with levels of their own. I’ll explain."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:


AMD goes Pro with Carrizo and Godavari

Subject: General Tech | September 30, 2015 - 01:04 PM |
Tagged: amd, carrizo pro, Godavari Pro, 28nm, hp, elitebook

The Carrizo based AMD Pro A12 APU is going to be familiar to anyone who read our coverage of the non-Pro Carrizo models.  The A12 will have a boost clock of 3.4GHz, eight 800MHz Radeon R7 cores, 2MB of L2 cache, and hardware based HEVC decoding, exactly like the FX-8800P.  Indeed there is nothing obvious that differentiates the two processors apart from AMD's tag line that the Pro models are designed for corporate desktops and laptops.  The Inquirer lists three laptops which should already be available which use the new mobile processor, the HP EliteBook 725, 745 and 755.  No news yet on Godavari Pro powered desktops.


"AMD HAS ANNOUNCED its "most powerful" line of Pro A-Series mobile and desktop processors, formerly codenamed Carrizo Pro and Godavari Pro."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk


Source: The Inquirer
Subject: General Tech
Manufacturer: Supermicro

Choosing the Right Platform

Despite what most people may think, our personal workstations here at the PC Perspective offices aren’t exactly comprised of cutting edge hardware. Just as in every other production environment, we place a real benefit on stability with the machines that we write, photo edit, and in this case, video edit on.

The current video editing workstation for PC Perspective offices is quite old when you look at the generations upon generations of hardware we have reviewed in the years since it was built. In fact, it has hardly been touched since early 2011. Built around the then $1000 Intel Core-i7 990X, 24GB of DDR3, a Fermi-based NVIDIA Quadro 5000, and a single 240gb SandForce 2 based SSD, this machine has edited a lot of 1080p video for us with little problems.


However, after starting to explore the Panasonic GH4 and 4K video a few months ago, the age of this machine became quite apparent. Real-time playback of high bit rate 4K content was choppy at best, and scrubbing through the timeline next to impossible. Transcoding to a lower resolution mezzanine file, or turning down the playback quality in Premiere Pro worked to some extent, but made the visual quality we gained more difficult to deal with. It was clear that we were going to need a new workstation sooner than later.

The main question was what platform to build upon. My initial thought was to build using the 8-core Intel Core i7-5960X and X99 platform. The main application we use, Adobe Premiere Pro (and it’s associated Media Encoder app) are very multithreaded. Going from 6-cores with the i7-990X to 8-cores with the i7-5960S with modest improvement in IPC didn’t seem like a big enough gain nor very future proof.


Luckily, we had a pair of Xeon E5-2680v2’s around from another testbed that had been replaced. These processors each provide 10 cores (Hyperthreading enabled for a resulting 20 threads each) at a base frequency of 2.8GHz, with the ability to boost up to 3.6GHz. By going with two of these processors in a dual CPU configuration, we will be significantly increasing our compute power and hopefully providing some degree of future proofing. Plus, we already use the slightly higher clocked Xeon E5-2690v2’s in our streaming server, so we have some experience with a very similar setup.

Continue reading an overview of our 2015 Editing Workstation Upgrade!!

NVIDIA Announces GeForce NOW Streaming Gaming Service

Subject: General Tech | September 30, 2015 - 09:00 AM |

In a continued evolution of the streaming gaming product previously known as GRID, NVIDIA is taking the wraps off of the final, consumer-ready version of the technology now called GeForce NOW. This streaming gaming service brings games from the cloud to NVIDIA SHIELD devices at up to 1920x1080 resolution and 60 FPS for fluid gameplay. This has been an announcement that we have been expecting for a very long time, with NVIDIA teasing GeForce NOW in the form of GRID private and public betas.


GeForce NOW, which shares a similar goal to services like PlayStation Now and OnLive, plans to stand out through a few key points.

  1. 1080p 60 FPS Support – Supporting higher resolutions than any other service as well as higher frame rates, the resulting product of GeForce NOW could be better than anything else on market for streaming gaming.
  2. Affordability – Coming in at a USD price tag of $7.99, NVIDIA believes that with a combination of included, free, games as well as purchase-and-play games offers a great package for a minimal monthly cost.
  3. Speed of Access – NVIDIA  claims that GeForce NOW can start up new games as much as 2x faster than PlayStation Now, with titles like The Witcher 3 loading up and streaming in as little as 30 seconds.
  4. Global – GeForce NOW will be available in North America, the European Union, Western Europe, Western Russia, and Japan.


Before we talk about the games list, let’s first discuss some of the technical requirements for GeForce NOW. The first, and most important, requirement is a SHIELD device. GeForce NOW will only work with the SHIELD Android TV device or SHIELD Tablet. That will definitely limit the audience for the streaming service, and I am very curious if and when NVIDIA will decide to open this technology and capability to general PC users or other Android/Apple devices. Part of the SHIELD requirement is definitely to promote its own brand, but it might also help gate access to GeForce NOW as the technology ramps up in capacity, etc.

Other than the host device, you’ll also need a speedy broadband network connection. The minimum requirement is 12 Mbps though you will need 20 Mbps of downstream for 720p60 support and 50 Mbps for 1080p60 resolution and frame rate. In terms of latency, you’ll need a 60 ms ping time as a requirement and its going to be recommended you have a 40 ms ping to the nearest NVIDIA server location for the best experience.

All the GeForce NOW servers are based on NVIDIA Kepler GPUs which is what enables the platform to offer up impressive resolutions and image quality settings for a streaming service. Bandwidth and latency are still a concern, of course, but we’ll touch on that aspect of the service when we have more time with it this week or the next.


Finally, let’s talk about the game library. There are ~60 games in the included library including certain games that you can play an unlimited amount of with your $7.99 membership fee. NVIDIA says more games will be added as the service continues.

Continue reading our overview of the new NVIDIA GeForce NOW game streaming service!!

Source: NVIDIA

'Learn to trust us, because we're not about to stop.'

Subject: Editorial, General Tech | September 29, 2015 - 03:30 PM |
Tagged: trust, security, rant, microsoft, metadata, fud

Privacy of any nature when you utilize a device connected to the internet is quickly becoming a joke and not a very funny one. Just to name a few, Apple tracks your devices, Google scans every email you send, Lenovo actually has two programs to track your usage and of course there is Windows 10 and the data it collects and sends.  Thankfully in some of these cases the programs which track and send your data can be disabled but the fact of the matter is that they are turned on by default.

The Inquirer hits the nail on the head "Money is simply a by-product of data." a fact which online sites such as Amazon and Facebook have known for a while and which software and hardware providers are now figuring out.  In some cases an informed choice to share personal data is made, but this is not always true. When you share to Facebook or post your Fitbit results to the web you should be aware you are giving companies valuable data, the real question is about the data and metadata you are sharing of which you are unaware of.


Should you receive compensation for the data you provide to these companies?  Should you always be able to opt out of sharing and still retain use of a particular service?  Perhaps the cost of utilizing that service is sharing your data instead of money?   There are a lot of questions and even a lot of different uses for this data but there is certainly no one single answer to those questions. 

Microsoft have been collecting data from BSoD's for decades and Windows users have all benefited from it even though there is no opt out for sending that data.  On the other hand is there a debt incurred towards Lenovo or other companies when you purchase a machine from them?  Does the collection of patterns of usage benefit Lenovo users in a similar way to the data generated by a Windows BSoD or does the risk of this monitoring software being corrupted by others for nefarious purposes outweigh any possible benefits?


Of course this is only the tip of the iceberg, the Internet of Things is poised to become a nightmare for those who value their security, there are numerous exploits to track your cellphone that have nothing to do with your provider and that is only the tip of the iceberg.  Just read through the Security tag here on PCPer for more examples if you have a strong stomach.

Please, take some time to think about how much you value your privacy and what data you are willing to share in exchange for products and services.  Integrate that concern into your purchasing decisions, social media and internet usage.  Hashtags are nice, but nothing speaks as loudly as your money; never forget that.

"MICROSOFT HAS SPOKEN out about its oft-criticised privacy policies, particularly those in the newly released Windows 10, which have provoked a spike in Bacofoil sales over its data collection policies."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk


Source: The Register