StarCraft II v3.0 Gets Another New UI

Subject: General Tech | October 3, 2015 - 11:04 PM |
Tagged: Starcraft II, legacy of the void, blizzard

Third time's the charm, unless they plan another release at some point.

The StarCraft II interface isn't perfect. Even though it is interesting and visually appealing, some tasks are unnecessarily difficult and space is not used in the most efficient way. To see what I mean, try to revert the multiplayer mode to Wings of Liberty, or, worse, find your Character Code. Blizzard released a new UI with Heart of the Swarm back in 2013, and they're doing a new one for the release of Legacy of the Void on November 10th. Note that my two examples probably won't be fixed in this update, they are just examples of UX issues.

While the update aligns with the new expansion, Blizzard will patch the UI for all content levels, including the free Starter Edition. This honestly makes sense, because it's easier to patch a title when all variations share a common core. Then again, not every company patches five-year-old titles like Blizzard does, so the back-catalog support is appreciated.


The most heartwarming change for fans, if pointless otherwise, is in the campaign selection screen. As the StarCraft II trilogy will be completed with Legacy of the Void, the interface aligns them as three episodes in the same style as the original StarCraft did.

On the functional side, the interface has been made more compact (which I alluded to earlier). This was caused by the new chat design, which is bigger yet less disruptive than it was in Heart of the Swarm. The column of buttons on the side are now a top bar, which expands down for sub-menu items.


While there are several things that I don't mention, a final note for this post is that Arcade will now focus on open lobbies. Players can look for the specific game they want, but the initial screen will show lobbies that are waiting to fill. The hope seems to be that players waiting for a game will spend less time. This raises two questions. First, Arcade games tend to have a steep learning curve, so I wonder if this feature will slump off after people try a few rounds before realizing that they should stick with a handful of games. Second, I wonder what this means for player numbers in general -- this sounds like a feature that is added during player declines, which Blizzard seems to hint is not occuring.

I'm not sure when the update will land, but it will probably be around the launch of Legacy of the Void on November 10th.

Source: Blizzard

Android to iPhone Day 6: Battery Life and Home Screens

Subject: General Tech, Mobile | October 1, 2015 - 02:45 PM |
Tagged: iphone 6s, iphone, ios, google, apple, Android

PC Perspective’s Android to iPhone series explores the opinions, views and experiences of the site’s Editor in Chief, Ryan Shrout, as he moves from the Android smartphone ecosystem to the world of the iPhone and iOS. Having been entrenched in the Android smartphone market for 7+ years, the editorial series is less of a review of the new iPhone 6s as it is an exploration on how the current smartphone market compares to what each sides’ expectations are.

Full Story Listing:


Day 4

It probably won’t come as a shock to the millions of iPhone users around the globe, but the more days I keep the 6s in my pocket, the more accepting I am becoming with the platform. The phone has been fast and reliable – I have yet to come across any instability or application crashes despite my incessant installations of new ones. And while I think it’s fair to say that even new Android-based phones feel snappy to user interactions out of the box, the iPhone is just about a week in without me ever thinking about performance – which is exactly what you want from a device like this.

There are some quirks and features missing from the iPhone 6s that I had on my Droid Turbo that I wish I could implement in settings or through third-party applications. I fell in love with the ability to do a double wrist rotation with the Droid as a shortcut to opening up the camera. It helped me capture quite a few photos when I only had access to a single hand and without having to unlock the phone, find an icon, etc. The best the iPhone has is a “drag up from the bottom” motion from the lock screen but I find myself taking several thumb swipes on it before successfully activating it when only using one hand. Trying to use the home button to access the lock screen, and thus the camera shortcut, is actually hindered because the Touch ID feature is TOO FAST, taking me to a home screen (that may not have the camera app icon on it) where I need to navigate around.

I have been a user of the Pebble Time since it was released earlier this year and I really enjoy the extended battery life (measured in days not hours) when compared to Android Wear devices or the Apple Watch. However, the capabilities of the Pebble Time are more limited with the iPhone 6s than they are with Android – I can no longer use voice dictation to reply to text messages or emails and the ability to reply with easy templates (yes, no, I’ll be there soon, etc.) is no longer available. Apple does not allow the same level of access to the necessary APIs as Android does and thus my Time has effectively become a read-only device.


Finally, my concern about missing widgets continues to stir within me; it is something that I think the iPhone 6s could benefit from greatly. I also don’t understand the inability to arrange the icons on the home screens in an arbitrary fashion. Apple will not let me move icons to the bottom of the page without first filling up every other spot on the screen – there can be no empty spaces!! So while my organizational style would like to have a group of three icons in the bottom right hand corner of the screen with some empty space around it, Apple doesn’t allow me to do that. If I want those icons in that location I need to fill up every empty space on the screen to do so. Very odd.

Continue reading my latest update on my Android to iPhone journey!!

Podcast #369 - Fable Legends DX12 Benchmark, Apple A9 SoC, Intel P3608 SSD, and more!

Subject: General Tech | October 1, 2015 - 02:17 PM |
Tagged: podcast, video, fable legends, dx12, apple, A9, TSMC, Samsung, 14nm, 16nm, Intel, P3608, NVMe, logitech, g410, TKL, nvidia, geforce now, qualcomm, snapdragon 820

PC Perspective Podcast #369 - 10/01/2015

Join us this week as we discuss the Fable Legends DX12 Benchmark, Apple A9 SoC, Intel P3608 SSD, and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: - Share with your friends!

  • iTunes - Subscribe to the podcast directly through the iTunes Store
  • RSS - Subscribe through your regular RSS reader
  • MP3 - Direct download link to the MP3 file

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Josh Walrath, Jeremy Hellstrom, and Allyn Malventano

Program length: 1:42:35

  1. Week in Review:
  2. 0:54:10 This episode of PC Perspective is brought to you by…Zumper, the quick and easy way to find your next apartment or home rental. To get started and to find your new home go to
  3. News item of interest:
  4. Hardware/Software Picks of the Week:
  5. Closing/outro

Subscribe to the PC Perspective YouTube Channel for more videos, reviews and podcasts!!

The headphones of choice on Aiur; Corsair's VOID

Subject: General Tech | October 1, 2015 - 01:43 PM |
Tagged: corsair, VOID Wireless, gaming headset, 7.1 headset

On paper these headphones are impressive, wireless performance out to 40' with 16 hours of charge, frequency response of 20Hz to 20kHz on the 50mm drivers and 7.1 surround sound.  There have been many previous software emulated 7.1 directional gaming headsets which have disappointed users but in this case Benchmark Reviews quite liked the performance of the VOID while gaming and listening to music.  The noise cancelling microphone, dubbed an “InfoMic” as it has LED lights which can be illuminated in different ways depending on your preferences and even the game you happen to be playing.  You can also sync the lights with other Corsair RGB devices using the Cue software if you are so inclined.  Check out the full reivew right here.


"In the world of computer peripherals and hardware, most of us are well aware of Corsair’s existence. This is an organization that has well-earned reputation for producing quality components; components that are going to be high-performing, intelligently designed, and very likely to provide its owners with years of service."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Audio Corner


You thought Stagefright was just taking a bow? Surprise! It's an encore.

Subject: General Tech | October 1, 2015 - 12:44 PM |
Tagged: stagefright, security, Android

Assuming you have a carrier with a sense of responsibility and a reasonably modern phone the chances are you are patched against the original Stagefright vulnerability.  This is not the case for the recently reported vulnerabilities dubbed Stagefright 2.0.  If you open a specially and nefariously modified MP3 or MP4 file in Stagefright on Android 5.0+ it has been confirmed that those files can trigger remote code execution via libstagefright.  If you are on an older model then the vulnerability lies in libutils and can be used for the same purpose, gaining access to the data stored on your device.  From the security company reports that The Register has linked, it sounds like we can expect many repeat performances as the Stagefright library was poorly written and contains many mistakes; worse is the fact that it is not sandboxed in any way and has significantly higher access than an application for playing media files should ever have.


"Joshua Drake from the security outfit Zimperium zLabs introduced us to StageFright earlier this summer, and he is now back with a similar warning and a brace of problems, according to a post on the Kaspersky Threatpost news site."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk


Source: The Register
Subject: General Tech
Manufacturer: NVIDIA

Setup, Game Selection

Yesterday NVIDIA officially announced the new GeForce NOW streaming game service, the conclusion to the years-long beta and development process known as NVIDIA GRID. As I detailed on my story yesterday about the reveal, GeForce NOW is a $7.99/mo. subscription service that will offer on-demand, cloud-streamed games to NVIDIA SHIELD devices, including a library of 60 games for that $7.99/mo. fee in addition to 7 titles in the “purchase and play” category. There are several advantages that NVIDIA claims make GeForce NOW a step above any other streaming gaming service including PlayStation Now, OnLive and others. Those include load times, resolution and frame rate, combined local PC and streaming game support and more.


I have been able to use and play with the GeForce NOW service on our SHIELD Android TV device in the office for the last few days and I thought I would quickly go over my initial thoughts and impressions up to this point.

Setup and Availability

If you have an NVIDIA SHIELD Android TV (or a SHIELD Tablet) then the setup and getting started process couldn’t be any simpler for new users. An OS update is pushed that changes the GRID application on your home screen to GeForce NOW and you can sign in using your existing Google account on your Android device, making payment and subscription simple to manage. Once inside the application you can easily browse through the included streaming games or look through the smaller list of purchasable games and buy them if you so choose.


Playing a game is as simple and selecting title from the grid list and hitting play.

Game Selection

Let’s talk about that game selection first. For $7.99/mo. you get access to 60 titles for unlimited streaming. I have included a full list below, originally posted in our story yesterday, for reference.

Continue reading my initial thoughts and an early review of GeForce NOW!!

This mouse goes to 12000! The ROCCAT Nyth

Subject: General Tech | September 30, 2015 - 04:05 PM |
Tagged: roccat, Nyth, gaming mouse, input

That is no typo, the Twin-Tech Laser Sensor R1 on the Nyth really does go all the way up to 12000 DPI and it also has an adjustable lift-off distance.  There are also 18 buttons, with the shift key function they can all be assigned a second function as well.  The Swarm software used to program the mouse is rather impressive, not only can you assign profiles to games you can program a light show into your mouse if you so desire.  It will set you back $120 but if the price tag does not scare you off you can see how it performs in MadShrimps' review.


"ROCCAT Nyth is like a breath of fresh air in the already crowded gaming mice market which sports quite a modular design with replaceable right side panel, no less than four different sets of buttons, a smooth durable plastic texture, catchy LED light effects and a comfortable shape for lengthy gaming sessions."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Mad Shrimps

It won't take skill to play Fallout 4

Subject: General Tech | September 30, 2015 - 02:31 PM |
Tagged: gaming, fallout 4

Fallout 4 is sounding less and less like a Fallout game and more like a game which happens to bear the name Fallout.  Apparently the skill system which has been a core of Fallout is confusing people, although how is unclear and the example given is rather poor “What’s better, the Charisma SPECIAL, or the Speech Skill" considering you can't have more than a 10 Charisma.  Perhaps it is too early to be negative, there will be 70 perks, 10 level for each SPECIAL stat and each perk with five levels to increase their effectiveness.  Your perks are limited by the stat, if you have a Perception of 7 then you will never be able to gain the perks associated with levels 8 and higher, then again if you have a stat of 10 at level 1 nothing is stopping you from starting with a level 10 perk.

There are going to be a lot of differences apparent in Fallout 4 and it will be interesting to see how they effect gameplay.  Excitiment is waning for some long time fans but perhaps for gamers new to the series who are in love with crafting, base management and are easily confused by numbers this will be a perfect introduction to the wasteland.  Follow the link to RPS to see the video explaining the new system.


"Here’s the big news: as many suspected, Skills are indeed gone, with their effects rolled into a bounteous system of perks with levels of their own. I’ll explain."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:


AMD goes Pro with Carrizo and Godavari

Subject: General Tech | September 30, 2015 - 01:04 PM |
Tagged: amd, carrizo pro, Godavari Pro, 28nm, hp, elitebook

The Carrizo based AMD Pro A12 APU is going to be familiar to anyone who read our coverage of the non-Pro Carrizo models.  The A12 will have a boost clock of 3.4GHz, eight 800MHz Radeon R7 cores, 2MB of L2 cache, and hardware based HEVC decoding, exactly like the FX-8800P.  Indeed there is nothing obvious that differentiates the two processors apart from AMD's tag line that the Pro models are designed for corporate desktops and laptops.  The Inquirer lists three laptops which should already be available which use the new mobile processor, the HP EliteBook 725, 745 and 755.  No news yet on Godavari Pro powered desktops.


"AMD HAS ANNOUNCED its "most powerful" line of Pro A-Series mobile and desktop processors, formerly codenamed Carrizo Pro and Godavari Pro."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk


Source: The Inquirer
Subject: General Tech
Manufacturer: Supermicro

Choosing the Right Platform

Despite what most people may think, our personal workstations here at the PC Perspective offices aren’t exactly comprised of cutting edge hardware. Just as in every other production environment, we place a real benefit on stability with the machines that we write, photo edit, and in this case, video edit on.

The current video editing workstation for PC Perspective offices is quite old when you look at the generations upon generations of hardware we have reviewed in the years since it was built. In fact, it has hardly been touched since early 2011. Built around the then $1000 Intel Core-i7 990X, 24GB of DDR3, a Fermi-based NVIDIA Quadro 5000, and a single 240gb SandForce 2 based SSD, this machine has edited a lot of 1080p video for us with little problems.


However, after starting to explore the Panasonic GH4 and 4K video a few months ago, the age of this machine became quite apparent. Real-time playback of high bit rate 4K content was choppy at best, and scrubbing through the timeline next to impossible. Transcoding to a lower resolution mezzanine file, or turning down the playback quality in Premiere Pro worked to some extent, but made the visual quality we gained more difficult to deal with. It was clear that we were going to need a new workstation sooner than later.

The main question was what platform to build upon. My initial thought was to build using the 8-core Intel Core i7-5960X and X99 platform. The main application we use, Adobe Premiere Pro (and it’s associated Media Encoder app) are very multithreaded. Going from 6-cores with the i7-990X to 8-cores with the i7-5960S with modest improvement in IPC didn’t seem like a big enough gain nor very future proof.


Luckily, we had a pair of Xeon E5-2680v2’s around from another testbed that had been replaced. These processors each provide 10 cores (Hyperthreading enabled for a resulting 20 threads each) at a base frequency of 2.8GHz, with the ability to boost up to 3.6GHz. By going with two of these processors in a dual CPU configuration, we will be significantly increasing our compute power and hopefully providing some degree of future proofing. Plus, we already use the slightly higher clocked Xeon E5-2690v2’s in our streaming server, so we have some experience with a very similar setup.

Continue reading an overview of our 2015 Editing Workstation Upgrade!!