ASUS, please offer us an alternative to IPS displays

Subject: Displays | November 20, 2012 - 01:33 PM |
Tagged: asus, PLS, lcd, 2560x1440, PB278Q, 27

Before they even turned the ASUS PB278Q on, Hardware Canucks had formed several opinions about the monitor; on the positive side the stand was very versatile and more stable than other 27" displays but on the negative side was the complete lack of an anti-glare coating.  The OSD was quite comprehensive, especially if you contrast it with some of the  high definition displays from Korea we have seen recently.  The overall performance of monitor was not quite up to the Samsung SyncMaster 27A850 which is another PLS display on the market, however you can get the ASUS display for at least $100 less which may make it the preferred choice of those needing something better than a TN display but can't afford the top model.

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"PLS panel technology hasn't been around for all that long but it has already made a lasting mark upon the display market. ASUS' new PB278Q puts this technology to good use in a 27" 2560 x 1440 WQHD monitor that is targeted towards gamers and professionals alike."

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Displays

Super Plane-to-Line Switching from Samsung

Subject: Displays | November 6, 2012 - 03:45 PM |
Tagged: Samsung, S27B970D, Super IPS, 2560x1440, 27

Super PLS is Samsung's attempt to improve IPS displays, they suggest that this technology will provide better brightness and viewing angles as well as lowering production costs, the latter benefit perhaps being the most attractive.  At a selling price of $1000 this might be hard to believe as is the 4th most expensive 27" on NewEgg right now.  ModSynergy also ran into issues trying to use the onboard speakers as HDMI cannot provide the maximum resolution of 2560x1440 and while using Dual-DVI you can get sound because there is no dedicated sound input jack. See if it is worth the investment by checking out their full review.

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"Today we look at Samsung's second integration of Super PLS technology in their lineup with this time the Series 9 S27B970D. What a great follow-up to the Series 8 S27A850D we had for you one month ago. It will be interesting to see and pinpoint the differences between both models aside from the higher price tag. One of the key differences being pushed off the bat by Samsung is the built-in calibration engine and factory professional tuning that the Series 9 S27B970D offers out of the box for unmatched visual experience, according to Samsung."

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Displays

Source: ModSynergy

Rounding up screens for judgment

Subject: Displays | October 16, 2012 - 02:47 PM |
Tagged:

While the pricing may not make sense to non-Europeans the performance results from this monitor round up from Hardware.Info will make sense no matter what currency you use to buy monitors.  17 monitors from 7 different companies are reviewed and compared in this round up, covering everything from response time to colour to power consumption.  Read on to find out not only the specifications of each monitor but also how they compare to the competition.

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"Speed isn't everything of course. A monitor still needs to have decent colour rendering and be reasonably priced. The BenQ XL2420T is far from cheap, but you can adjust the height, rotate it, and it comes with many connectors and an integrated USB hub. In terms of response times, it scores the best. It has a 120 Hz refresh rate, and the other test results are also very good."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

Manufacturer: PC Perspective

And Why the Industry Misses the Point

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I am going to take a somewhat unpopular stance: I really like stereoscopic 3D. I also expect to change your mind and get you excited about stereoscopic 3D too - unless of course a circumstance such as monovision interferes with your ability to see 3D at all. I expect to accomplish where the industry has failed simply because I will not ignore the benefits of 3D in my explanation.

Firstly - we see a crisp image when our brain is more clearly able to make out objects in a scene.

We typically have two major methods of increasing the crispness of an image: we either increase the resolution or we increase the contrast of the picture. As resolution increases we receive a finer grid of positional information to place and contain the objects in the scene. As contrast increases we receive a wider difference between the brightest points and the darkest points from a scene which prevents objects from blending together in a mess of grey.

We are also able to experience depth information by comparing the parallax effect across both of our eyes. We are able to encapsulate each object into a 3D volume and position each capsule a more defined distance apart. Encapsulated objects appear crisper because we can more clearly see them as sharply defined independent objects.

Be careful with this stereoscopic 3D image. To see the 3D effect you must slowly cross your eyes until the two images align in the center. This should only be attempted by adults with fully developed eyes and without prior medical conditions. Also, sit a comfortable distance away so you do not need to cross your eyes too far inward and rest your eyes until they no longer feel strained. In short - do not pull an eye muscle or something. Use common sense. Also move your mouse cursor far away from the image as it will break your focusing lock and click on the image to make it full sized.

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Again, be careful when crossing your eyes to see stereoscopic 3D and relax them when you are done.

The above image is a scene from Unreal Tournament 3 laid out in a cross-eyed 3D format. If you are safely able to experience the 3D image then I would like you to pay careful attention to how crisp the 3D image appeared. Compare this level of crispness to either the left or right eye image by itself.

Which has the crisper picture quality?

That is basically why 3D is awesome: it makes your picture quality appear substantially better by giving your brain more information about the object. This effect can also play with how the brain perceives the world you present it: similar to how HDR tonal mapping plays with exposure ranges we cannot see and infrared photography plays with colors we cannot see to modify the photograph - which we can see - for surreal effects.

So what goes terribly wrong? Read on to the article to find out.

Professional quality colour from Acer's new $300 IPS panel

Subject: Displays | September 11, 2012 - 01:17 PM |
Tagged: acer, B243PWL, ips monitor, led lcd

IPS panels are overtaking TN monitors in popularity as the prices begin to decline and people familiarize themselves with the quality and viewing angles of IPS displays.  Acer has introduced their $300 B243PWL 24" 1920 x 1200 display into this crowded market, a fairly simple looking display which sports speakers that utilize ports cut into the back of the monitor as opposed to enlarging the bezel to provide space.  It has DVI, DisplayPort, and VGA ports but no HDMI if that is your connector of choice.  Hardware Canucks found the performance in gaming to be less than perfect as they witnessed moderate ghosting while playing games but for professional usage when colour gamut and accuracy matters more than speed.  Check out the full review here.

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"With an IPS panel, low power consumption and a sub-$300 price point, Acer's new 24" B243PWL monitor seems to have what it takes for success. However, in a field that's saturated with competitors, does it have the necessary combination of features and quality to stand out?"

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

Someone got to play with the Oculus Rift

Subject: Displays | August 8, 2012 - 03:46 PM |
Tagged: oculus rift, virtual reality, glasses, quakecon

Legit Reviews were lucky enough to have some hands on time with the prototype Occulus Rift, the surround gaming headset at QuakeCon.  It is impossible to really show you what it looks like to game with these glasses on but everyone who tried them were amazed.  The 1280x800 resolution is actually 640x800 per eye thanks to the limits of both the HDMI standard and in an attempt to keep costs down.  As well the only game currently supporting the prototype is Doom III BFG Edition but it is still a good excuse to replay the game.  The Kickstarter project has hit its goal, though you can still donate if you wish and you can get a kit to build your own glasses for around $300 if you can't wait for them to hit retail.

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"Oculus Rift is a new virtual reality (VR) headset designed specifically for video games that will change the way you think about gaming forever. With an incredibly wide field of view, high resolution display, and ultra-low latency head tracking, the Rift provides a truly immersive experience that allows you to step inside your favorite game and explore new worlds like never before. Read on to see what we found out when we tried one in person."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

Deals for August 8th - 27-in Planar 1080p Display for $209

Subject: General Tech, Displays | August 8, 2012 - 10:16 AM |
Tagged: deal of the day, planar, monitor

Today's deals are quite assorted but the highlight for me is the 27-in Planar PX2710MW 1080p monitor that you can grab for an impressively low price of $209.99!!

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Check out the other deals available today!

Laptops

17.3" Alienware M17x Core i7-2670QM 2.2GHz Quad-core 1080p Gaming Laptop w/4GB RAM, 750GB HDD, 2GB Radeon HD 6970M for $1,449 with free shipping (normally $1,849 - use coupon code on LogicBuy).

17.3" HP Pavilion dv7t-7000 Quad Edition Core i7-3610QM 2.3GHz Quad-core Laptop w/8GB RAM, 1TB HDD, Blu-ray & GeForce GT 630M for $800 with free shipping (normally $1000 - use coupon code on LogicBuy).

15.6" Samsung Series 3 AMD A63420M 1.5GHz Quad-core Laptop w/4GB RAM, 500GB HDD for $400 (normally $530).

15.6" Toshiba Satellite L750D AMD A6-3420M 1.5GHz Quad-core Laptop w/4GB RAM, 320GB HDD for $400 (normally $550).

15.6" HP ProBook 4535s AMD E2-3000M 1.8GHz Dual-core Laptop w/4GB RAM, 320GB HDD & Windows 7 Professional for $430 (normally $550).

Desktops

Dell Vostro 470 Core i5-3450 3.1GHz Quad-core Mini Tower w/4GB RAM, 500GB HDD & Wireless-N, Bluetooth for $529 with free shipping (normally $679 - use coupon code W9D06J14FX10WM).

Acer Predator AG3610-UR10P Core i7-2600 3.4GHz Quad-core Desktop w/8GB RAM, 2TB HDD, 2GB GeForce GT 530 for $900 (normally $1,050).

23" HP Pavilion 23-1000z AMD A6-5400K 3.6GHz Dual-core 1080p All-in-one PC w/4GB RAM, 500GB HDD for $630 with free shipping (normally $750 - use coupon code 20LOGICBUY).

Monitors

27" Planar PX2710MW 1080p 2ms LCD Monitor w/ HDMI & 3-year warranty for $210 with free shipping (normally $470 - use coupon code D84NDZ3JCT3K3K).

27" ASUS VE278Q 1080p LED-backlit LCD Monitor w/ DisplayPort for $300 with free shipping (normally $330 - use coupon code SOD68788).

22" Dell E2213 1680 x 1050 LED-backlit LCD Monitor w/3-year warranty for $151 with free shipping (normally $199 - use coupon code on LogicBuy).

Peripherals

EVGA GeForce GTX 460 2Win (Fermi) 2GB GDDR5 Dual GPU Video Card for $170 with free shipping (normally $250 - use this form).

4TB (2 x 2TB) Iomega StorCenter ix2-200 Network Storage Cloud Edition for $325 with free shipping (normally $469.99 - use coupon code USMEDALS).

240GB SanDisk Extreme 2.5" SATA III SSD (SDSSDX-240G-G25) for $170 with free shipping (normally $230).

120GB Kingston HyperX 3K 2.5" SATA III SSD for $80 with free shipping (normally $150).

Sony Bluetooth Wireless Keyboard (VGP-BKB1) for $70 with free shipping (normally $99).

Targus Meridian II 15.6" Roller Laptop Case for $75 with free shipping (normally $90).

Dell 1355cn Multifunction Color Printer for $237 with free shipping (normally $300).

Tablets

10.1" Toshiba Excite 16GB Quad-core Tegra 3 Android 4.0 Tablet for $384 with free shipping (normally $399 - use coupon code on LogicBuy).

10.1" Asus Transformer Pad Infinity TF700T 32GB Tablet + Dock Bundle for $608 with free shipping (normally $650).

Logitech Bluetooth Keyboard Case (iPad 2) for $44 with free shipping (normally $60 - use coupon code).

Gaming:

GUNNAR Call of Duty MW3 Gaming Eyewear for $50 with free shipping (normally $100).

Devil May Cry Collection (360/PS3) for $30 with free shipping (normally $40).

Metal Gear Solid HD Collection (360/PS3) for $30 with free shipping (normally $40).

Home Entertainment:

47" LG 47LD950C 1080p 240Hz 3D LCD HDTV for $700 (normally $849 - use this form).

46" Westinghouse LD-4680 120Hz 1080p LED HDTV for $570 with free shipping (normally $800).

46" Sharp LC-46SV49U 1080p LCD HDTV for $480 with free shipping (normally $600).

46" Samsung UN46D6000 1080p 120Hz LED HDTV for $827 with free shipping (normally $1,099).

32" Proscan PLED3204A720p LED HDTV for $190 (normally $250 - use coupon code on LogicBuy).

Personal Portables & Peripherals:

Sony In-Ear Headphones iPod/iPhone Remote for $80 with free shipping (normally $99).

12MP Canon PowerShot SX230 HS Red Digital Camera for $194 with free shipping (normally $229 - use coupon code Learn2SaveBG5).

14MP Olympus Tough TG-320 Digital Camera Bundle for $131 with free shipping (normally $159).

Source: LogicBuy

Gigabyte Unveils GA-H77N-WIFI Mini-ITX Motherboard

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards, Motherboards, Cases and Cooling, Processors, Chipsets, Memory, Displays | August 7, 2012 - 07:07 AM |
Tagged: Z77, motherboard, mini-itx, Intel, gigabyte, ga-h77n-wifi

During a European roadshow, Gigabyte showed off a new Mini-ITX form factor motherboard for the first time. Called the GA-H77N-WIFI, the motherboard is well suited for home theater and home server tasks. Based on the H77 chipset, it is compatible with the latest Intel Core i3 (coming soon), i5, and i7 "Ivy Bridge" processors. The board goes for an all-black PCB with minimal heatsinks on the VRMs, and the form factor is the same size as the motherboard that Ryan recently used in his Mini-ITX HTPC build.

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The GA-H77N-WIFI features a LGA 1155 processor socket, two DDR3 DIMM slots, PCI Express slot, two SATA 3Gbps ports, two SATA 6Gbps ports, and an internal USB 3.0 header. There are also two Realtek Ethernet controller chips and a Realtek audio chip.

Rear IO on the Mini-ITX motherboard includes:
  • 1 PS/2 port
  • 2 USB 3.0 ports
  • 2 HDMI ports
  • 1 DVI port
  • 2 Antenna connectors (WIFI)
  • 4 USB 2.0 ports
  • 2 Gigabit Ethernet ports
  • 1 Optical S/PDIF port
  • 5 Analog audio jacks

The dual Gigabit Ethernet ports are interesting. It could easily be loaded with open source routing software and turned into router/firewall/Wi-Fi access point. To really take advantage of the Ivy Bridge support, you could put together a nice media server and HTPC recording/streaming box (using something like SiliconDust's HDHomeRun networked tuners or Ceton's USB tuner since this board is very scarce in the way of PCI-E slots). What would you do with this Mini-ITX Gigabyte board?

Unfortunately, there is no word yet on pricing or availability, but the motherboard is likely coming soon. You can find more information on the motherboard over at tonymacx86, who managed to snag get some photos of the board.

Source: Tony Mac X86

Asus VG278HE Is 27" 1080p, 144 Hz Gaming Monitor

Subject: Displays | July 26, 2012 - 08:17 PM |
Tagged: tn monitor, nvidia, monitor, asus, 3d vision 2, 144hz, 1080p

ASUS has a new 27” desktop monitor that should be hitting shelves soon. The VG278HE is an LED-backlit TN display with 1920x1080p resolution. So far, the specs are fairly lackluster, especially considering it is a 27” monitor. What is impressive about the display is the refresh rate. At 144 Hz, it offers up some promising 3D benefits, and as such it is compatible with NVIDIA’s 3D Vision 2 technology (the necessary glasses and transmitter are sold separately).

For 3D, the 144 Hz refresh rate means that you can get 72 Hz per eye, which should make it a much smoother experience that cuts down on flicker. It also suggests benefits for 2D gamers as well, because you can enable V-Sync to reducing tearing and still get respectable frame rates. Sure, 240 hertz would be really nice, but at least this is a step in the right direction for desktop monitors that seem to be perpetually stuck at 1080p resolutions (unless you go Korean, of course – as Josh would put it). The TN panel and resolution are drawbacks, but depending on price this may still be a good buy. Unfortunately, there is no word yet on pricing or availability according to Flat Panels HD.

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Other features of the monitor include a swivel, tilt, and height-adjustable stand, and HDMI, DVI, and VGA video inputs. Further, the monitor offers up two three watt speakers – and better yet – a headphone jack to connect powered speakers or headphones to. (At least that’s the reported spec, I hope that it’s not simply an input like my ASUS monitor has).

Personally, I think that I would rather have a higher resolution monitor than one with a faster refresh rate, but it seems to be a highly debated topic. I’m interesting in what you think. Which do you prefer, resolution or refresh rate (3D aside)?

Granted, as Ken reported earlier this month, if you are lucky you may be able to get the best of both worlds and snag an overclockable IPS monitor – but you’ll pay for the privilege.

Philips brings affordable IPS technology to your desktop

Subject: Displays | July 17, 2012 - 04:13 PM |
Tagged: philips, blade 2, ips display

Continuing the theme Ken started, of examining unfamiliar yet high quality displays, is a new monitor from Philips called the Blade 2.  Currently available across the pond in the UK, it retails for the equivalent of $260USD which puts it close to the price of the Achieva Shimian but nowhere near the pixel count as it is a 1080p monitor.  Hardware.Info was impressed by the smooth looks of the monitor but when it got down to testing there was little about the monitor that stood out.  That is partially a good thing as there was nothing wrong with the monitors performance but it does cost more than the competition so it is up to you to decide if the aesthetics are worth the extra investment.

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"The market for PC monitors is dominated by very similar-looking designs, but once in a while a new display will come out that stands out against the crowd. Philips, for example, has its Blade series which are thin screens with an elegant design. We are witnessing more and more IPS- and VA-based panels being used in computer monitors, but the majority still feature the traditional TN panel. Philips is now part of the growing trend of non-TN panels, with the launch of the Blade 2."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays