CES 2015: ASUS MG279Q WQHD Gaming Monitor with 120Hz IPS Panel

Subject: Displays | January 5, 2015 - 02:30 PM |
Tagged: monitor, ips, in plane switching, gaming monitor, display, ces 2015, CES, asus

UPDATE 1/9/15: Just a heads up that we have video of the ASUS MG279Q as well as new information on pricing and confirmation that AMD will NOT blacklist this monitor out of working with its GPUs in a variable refresh manner.

ASUS is showing the 27-inch MG279Q monitor at this year’s CES, and this display features the vaunted in-plane switching (IPS) technology and a 2560 x 1440 (WQHD) resolution.


Even more impressive, this panel offers frame rates of 120Hz with a 5ms grey-to-grey (GTG) response time according to ASUS. Additionally, the display features a narrow bezel, the ASUS-exclusive navigation joystick for the on-screen display (OSD), and their dedicated “GamePlus” hotkey which “displays a customizable crosshair and timer overlap for enhanced combat”. The stand is also built with full tilt, swivel, pivot and height adjustment, cable management, and is VESA wall-mountable.

Connectivity includes DisplayPort and Mini DisplayPort, two HDMI ports (for native WQHD) and a Mobile High-Definition Link (MHL) 2.0 socket for 1080p connections to mobile devices (with simultaneous charging). The monitor also includes a two-port USB 3.0 hub.

One more thing...

While officially only listing a generic "DisplayPort" input, we have learned this supports DP 1.2a Plus. What does this mean? At least on paper that would indicate that this monitor could offer AdaptiveSync / FreeSync support. We could also pretty safely assume that a WQHD monitor without G-SYNC will be priced considerably lower than an ROG Swift. It's all very interesting...

Pricing and availability have not been released.

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Source: ASUS

CES 2015: AMD Announces World's First Shipping FreeSync Monitors

Subject: Displays | January 5, 2015 - 02:17 PM |
Tagged: viewsonic, Samsung, Nixeus, monitor, LG Electronics, freesync, display, ces 2015, CES, benq, amd

Today AMD announced that they will be shipping 7 new Freesync displays in 2015 with their partners, BenQ, LG Electronics, Nixeus, Samsung, and Viewsonic.


As we learn more about these individual FreeSync-enabled models we will provide updates, and AMD has stated that there will be models shipping this month.

The full PR announcement from AMD appears below:

AMD today announced the expansion of the FreeSync ecosystem as technology partners including BenQ, LG Electronics, Nixeus, Samsung, and Viewsonic showcased their upcoming commercially available FreeSync-enabled displays at the 2015 International CES. The unveiling of new FreeSync-enabled displays demonstrates the industry's commitment to open standards-based technology that enables improved gaming by synchronizing dynamic refresh rates of the displays to the frame rate of AMD Radeon™ R-Series graphics cards and current generation APUs. The result greatly reduces input latency and helps reduce or eliminate visual defects during gaming and video playback. The new displays range in size between 24" to 34", supporting refresh rates of 30 to 144 Hz, and resolutions of 1080p up to Ultra HD, offering a variety of options for every gamer's needs and at virtually every price point.

"The broad adoption of FreeSync technology from our partners shows how the industry strongly values the same open ecosystem and quality that AMD strives for," said Roy Taylor, corporate vice president, ISV/IHV Partner Group, AMD. "Gamers who use FreeSync technology with AMD Radeon™ R-Series graphics and AMD latest generation of APUs can rest assured that they're enjoying the best possible experience."

Monitors from BenQ, LG Electronics, Nixeus, and Samsung are on display at AMD's booth, San Polo rooms 3402 - 3404 at The Venetian at CES Tech West. Displays are expected to be available in market starting this month with additional models set to launch in early 2015.

List of Announced Displays

Manufacturer Model # Size Resolution Refresh Rate
BenQ XL2730Z 27" QHD (2560x1440) 144Hz
LG Electronics 29UM67 29" 2560x1080 75Hz
LG Electronics 34UM67 34" 2560x1080 75Hz
Nixeus NX-VUE24 24" 1080p 144Hz
Samsung UE590 23.6", 28" 4K 60Hz
Samsung UE850 23.6", 28", 31.5" 4K 60Hz
Viewsonic VX2701mh 27" 1080p 144Hz



The BenQ XL2730Z (image credit: BenQ)

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Source: AMD

CES 2015: We Just Spotted the ASUS PG27AQ 4K 60 Hz IPS G-Sync Monitor

Subject: Displays, Shows and Expos | January 5, 2015 - 01:17 PM |
Tagged: pg27aq, ips, gsync, g-sync, ces 2015, CES, asus, 60hz, 4k

Sure, the ASUS press conference hasn't started yet, but we did find a new monitor on display in the lobby. The ASUS PG27AQ is a 27-in monitor with a 4K resolution and a 60 Hz refresh rate. Even better is that this is an IPS panel and utilizes NVIDIA G-Sync technology. That's right, a real-life IPS G-Sync monitor!


I don't have many other details yet but I was told that pricing is not set and availability would be in the "second half of 2015." The physical construction is identical to that of the ASUS ROG Swift PG278Q. Unfortunately ASUS was only playing back a 4K video on the system, no real-world G-Sync testing quite yet. The ASUS press event starts in just about 45 minutes so stay tuned!


So, who's interested?

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CES 2015: Philips Announces 34" Curved UltraWide 21:9 IPS Display, the 1440p BDM3490UC

Subject: Displays | January 5, 2015 - 12:08 PM |
Tagged: uwqhd, ultrawide, philips, ips, curved lcd, ces 2015, CES, 3440x1440, 21:9

Philips is showing a new 34-inch, 21:9 monitor at this year's CES, and the ultra-wide monitor will feature a curved IPS panel with 3440x1440 resolution.


The BDM3490UC monitor has a 60 Hz IPS panel with a native response time of 14 ms, though this can be adjusted down to 5 ms using the "SmartResponse" control. This model also features MultiView technology which enables two active connections to be used simultaneously, allowing multiple devices to share the screen.


  • Panel Type: AH-IPS 
  • Backlight: W-LED 
  • Panel Size: 34.1" 
  • Resolution: 3440 x 1440 @ 60 Hz 
  • Response time (typical): 14 ms (Grey to Grey) 
  • SmartResponse (typical) 5 ms (Grey to Grey)
  • Brightness (typical): 300 cd/m² 
  • Contrast ratio (typical): 1000:1 
  • Viewing angle: 178° (H) x 178° (V) @ C/R > 10 
  • Display colors: 1.07 billion colors (8-bits + FRC) 
  • Display inputs: DisplayPort 1.2 x 1, HDMI 2.0 x 1, HDMI 1.4 (w/MHL) x 1, HDMI 1.4 x 1 
  • USB: USB 3.0 x4 (1 with BC 1.2 Fast Charging) 
  • Audio in/out: PC audio in, headphone out 
  • Built-in speakers: 7 W x2 with DTS sound 
  • Tilt: -5/20 degree 
  • Power supply: External 
  • Color: Black


No word on pricing or availability just yet.

Coverage of CES 2015 is brought to you by Logitech!

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Source: Philips

CES 2015: Lenovo Shows Off New 24" ThinkVision Display

Subject: Displays | January 4, 2015 - 10:00 PM |
Tagged: thinkvision, thin bezel, PCM, neo-blade ips, Lenovo, ips, ces 2015

Today at the Consumer Electronics Show, Lenovo announced updates and new additions to its Think-branded products aimed at business customers. New ThinkPad PCs, ThinkVision displays, and stackable ThinkPad accessories are launching early this year. 

ThinkVision X24

Lenovo is also expanding its line of professional displays with the ThinkVision X24. This monitor is a slim full HD display with a thin bezel aimed at business users desiring single or dual monitor setups. The ThinkVision X24 is a 23.6" Neo-Blade IPS panel with a resolution of 1920x1080. Lenovo used pre-coated metal (PCM) for the rear panel to get the monitor to as thin as 7.5mm. The chrome stand supports tilt adjustments but not swivel or height.


The ThinkVision X24 supports HDMI and DisplayPort inputs, 7ms response time, 1000:1 contrast ratio, 250cd/m^2 brightness, and 178-degree viewing angles. The left and right bezels are extremely thin to allow for favorable dual monitor setups. The ThinkVision X24 provides a new budget option ($249) for the ThinkVision family.

The ThinkVision X24 will be available in April starting at $249.

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Source: Lenovo

CES 2015: Acer Announces New 27-inch Gaming Monitors Including IPS G-SYNC

Subject: Displays | January 3, 2015 - 07:55 PM |
Tagged: monitor, ips, gaming, g-sync, ces 2015, CES, acer, 144hz


Today Acer has announced two new gaming monitors with "world first" designs. First we have the XB270HU, which is the world’s first NVIDIA G-SYNC gaming monitor with an IPS panel. This is a big step for a category that has predominantly featured TN panels, though it was not stated what the response time of the IPS panel in use might be. We can expect 178° viewing angles and that nice IPS color accuracy, however. The XB270HU also features tilt, swivel, and height adjustment.


IPS provides realistic color, wide viewing angles, and this sweet logo

Next is the Acer XG270HU (yes, this is a different model name), which Acer says is "the world's first gaming monitor with an edge-to-edge frameless display", which would allow for gapless multi-monitor setups. This one does not feature IPS, but it has the advantage of a 1 ms response time. Inputs will include HDMI 2.0, DVI, and DisplayPort 1.2. The other added feature of the XG270HU is Acer "EyeProtect technology", which "eliminates screen flicker through a stable supply of power", as well as proprietary non-glare and screen dimming features. Both XB270HU and XG270HU monitors have 27-inch displays with WQHD (2560 x 1440) resolution and 144Hz refresh rates.

These will available globally and begin shipping in March 2015.

Coverage of CES 2015 is brought to you by Logitech!

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Source: Acer

LG Announces 34UM67 UltraWide Gaming Monitor with AMD FreeSync

Subject: Displays | December 31, 2014 - 10:29 AM |
Tagged: LG, 34um67, ultrawide, 21:9, CES, ces 2015, freesync, adaptive sync

Let the variable refresh rate monitor battle begin! This week LG has announced a gaming-specific 21:9 aspect ratio monitor that features support for AMD's FreeSync variable refresh rate technology. LG joins Samsung as monitor vendors that have officially thrown in hats with the AMD-backed and VESA standard Adaptive Sync technology rather than NVIDIA's G-Sync (or maybe in addition to). 

The new 34UM67 is a flat, 34-in 21:9 aspect ratio display; a style that is becoming increasing popular among enthusiast and gamers as they offer expanding views in some games without the need to use multiple monitors in a Eyefinity or Surround configuration. LG has not announced the resolution yet but I assume that since they aren't bragging about it openly, that we are looking at a 2560x1080 screen rather than 3440x1440. Still, coupling that resolution with support for a variable refresh technology should provide an impressive gaming experience. 


Here is what the official press release has to say about the new LG 34UM67 being shown next week at CES:

LG's UltraWide Gaming Monitor (34UM67) is the company's first 21:9 monitor specifically developed for graphics-intensive gaming. AMD's FreeSync technology eliminates the screen tearing that occurs when the monitor and graphics card are out of sync. Furthermore FreeSync technology guarantees the smoothest and most seamless gaming experience, generating fluid motion without any loss of frame rate.

"AMD FreeSync technology is an innovative monitor technology, based on free and open industry standards, to eliminate the tearing and stuttering that has plagued PC gaming for 30 years," said Roy Taylor, corporate vice president of ISV/IHV Partner Group, AMD. "We are pleased that LG Electronics stands with us with truly exciting  AMD FreeSync-ready displays like the LG UltraWide Gaming Monitor."

The 34UM67 also has an exceptional UltraWide field of view (FOV), allowing gamers to gain the upper hand by revealing hidden spaces that were invisible on regular 16:9 monitors. The monitor's Black Stabilizer illuminates dark scenes and helps to clearly define the deep black areas where objects and enemies could be hidden. The Dynamic Action Sync mode minimizes input lag, enhancing users' real time gaming experience. Many popular games such as Battlefield 4, World of Warcraft and ArcheAge currently support 21:9 resolution with more games expected to support this resolution in the future.

Support for 21:9 resolutions is still spotty in most PC titles and can result in the same kind of FOV scaling issues we see with Eyefinity. More games are including direct support for these monitors and hopefully 2015 will see a focus on that with each game release. 

I still have a lot of questions about AMD's FreeSync technology and how it will stand up to the effectiveness of NVIDIA G-Sync, but I am eager to see it first hand. CES will provide the first opportunity for us but we will obviously need extended time with panels in our offices to make a final decision.

Source: PRNewsWire
Subject: Displays
Manufacturer: Acer

Technical Specifications

NVIDIA's G-Sync technology and the monitors that integrate it continue to be one of hottest discussion topics surrounding PC technology and PC gaming. We at PC Perspective have dived into the world of variable refresh rate displays in great detail, discussing the technological reasons for it's existence, talking with co-creator Tom Petersen in studio, doing the first triple-panel Surround G-Sync testing as well as reviewing several different G-Sync monitor's available on the market. We were even the first to find the reason behind the reported flickering a 0 FPS on G-Sync monitors.


A lot of has happened in the world of displays in the year or more since NVIDIA first announced G-Sync technology including a proliferation of low cost 4K panels as well as discussion of FreeSync, AMD's standards-based alternative to G-Sync. We are still waiting for our first hands on time (other than a static demo) with monitors supporting FreeSync / AdaptiveSync and it is quite likely that will occur at CES this January. If it doesn't, AMD is going to have some serious explaining to do...

But today we are looking at the new Acer XB270H, a 1920x1080 27-in monitor with G-Sync support and a 144 Hz refresh rate; a unique combination. In fact, there is no other 27-in 144 Hz 1080p monitor on the market that we are aware of after a quick search of Newegg.com and Amazon.com. But does this monitor offer the same kind of experience as the ASUS ROG Swift PG278Q or even the Acer XB280HK 4K G-Sync panels?

Continue reading our review of the Acer XB270H 1080p 144 Hz G-Sync Monitor!!

Manufacturer: PC Percpective


We’ve been tracking NVIDIA’s G-Sync for quite a while now. The comments section on Ryan’s initial article erupted with questions, and many of those were answered in a follow-on interview with NVIDIA’s Tom Petersen. The idea was radical – do away with the traditional fixed refresh rate and only send a new frame to the display when it has just completed rendering by the GPU. There are many benefits here, but the short version is that you get the low-latency benefit of V-SYNC OFF gaming combined with the image quality (lack of tearing) that you would see if V-SYNC was ON. Despite the many benefits, there are some potential disadvantages that come from attempting to drive an LCD panel at varying periods of time, as opposed to the fixed intervals that have been the norm for over a decade.


As the first round of samples came to us for review, the current leader appeared to be the ASUS ROG Swift. A G-Sync 144 Hz display at 1440P was sure to appeal to gamers who wanted faster response than the 4K 60 Hz G-Sync alternative was capable of. Due to what seemed to be large consumer demand, it has taken some time to get these panels into the hands of consumers. As our Storage Editor, I decided it was time to upgrade my home system, placed a pre-order, and waited with anticipation of finally being able to shift from my trusty Dell 3007WFP-HC to a large panel that can handle >2x the FPS.

Fast forward to last week. My pair of ROG Swifts arrived, and some other folks I knew had also received theirs. Before I could set mine up and get some quality gaming time in, my bro FifthDread and his wife both noted a very obvious flicker on their Swifts within the first few minutes of hooking them up. They reported the flicker during game loading screens and mid-game during background content loading occurring in some RTS titles. Prior to hearing from them, the most I had seen were some conflicting and contradictory reports on various forums (not limed to the Swift, though that is the earliest panel and would therefore see the majority of early reports), but now we had something more solid to go on. That night I fired up my own Swift and immediately got to doing what I do best – trying to break things. We have reproduced the issue and intend to demonstrate it in a measurable way, mostly to put some actual data out there to go along with those trying to describe something that is borderline perceptible for mere fractions of a second.

screen refresh rate-.png

First a bit of misnomer correction / foundation laying:

  • The ‘Screen refresh rate’ option you see in Windows Display Properties is actually a carryover from the CRT days. In terms of an LCD, it is the maximum rate at which a frame is output to the display. It is not representative of the frequency at which the LCD panel itself is refreshed by the display logic.
  • LCD panel pixels are periodically updated by a scan, typically from top to bottom. Newer / higher quality panels repeat this process at a rate higher than 60 Hz in order to reduce the ‘rolling shutter’ effect seen when panning scenes or windows across the screen.
  • In order to engineer faster responding pixels, manufacturers must deal with the side effect of faster pixel decay between refreshes. This is a balanced by increasing the frequency of scanning out to the panel.
  • The effect we are going to cover here has nothing to do with motion blur, LightBoost, backlight PWM, LightBoost combined with G-Sync (not currently a thing, even though Blur Busters has theorized on how it could work, their method would not work with how G-Sync is actually implemented today).

With all of that out of the way, let’s tackle what folks out there may be seeing on their own variable refresh rate displays. Based on our testing so far, the flicker only presented at times when a game enters a 'stalled' state. These are periods where you would see a split-second freeze in the action, like during a background level load during game play in some titles. It also appears during some game level load screens, but as those are normally static scenes, they would have gone unnoticed on fixed refresh rate panels. Since we were absolutely able to see that something was happening, we wanted to be able to catch it in the act and measure it, so we rooted around the lab and put together some gear to do so. It’s not a perfect solution by any means, but we only needed to observe differences between the smooth gaming and the ‘stalled state’ where the flicker was readily observable. Once the solder dust settled, we fired up a game that we knew could instantaneously swing from a high FPS (144) to a stalled state (0 FPS) and back again. As it turns out, EVE Online does this exact thing while taking an in-game screen shot, so we used that for our initial testing. Here’s what the brightness of a small segment of the ROG Swift does during this very event:

eve ss-2-.png

Measured panel section brightness over time during a 'stall' event. Click to enlarge.

The relatively small ripple to the left and right of center demonstrate the panel output at just under 144 FPS. Panel redraw is in sync with the frames coming from the GPU at this rate. The center section, however, represents what takes place when the input from the GPU suddenly drops to zero. In the above case, the game briefly stalled, then resumed a few frames at 144, then stalled again for a much longer period of time. Completely stopping the panel refresh would result in all TN pixels bleeding towards white, so G-Sync has a built-in failsafe to prevent this by forcing a redraw every ~33 msec. What you are seeing are the pixels intermittently bleeding towards white and periodically being pulled back down to the appropriate brightness by a scan. The low latency panel used in the ROG Swift does this all of the time, but it is less noticeable at 144, as you can see on the left and right edges of the graph. An additional thing that’s happening here is an apparent rise in average brightness during the event. We are still researching the cause of this on our end, but this brightness increase certainly helps to draw attention to the flicker event, making it even more perceptible to those who might have not otherwise noticed it.

Some of you might be wondering why this same effect is not seen when a game drops to 30 FPS (or even lower) during the course of normal game play. While the original G-Sync upgrade kit implementation simply waited until 33 msec had passed until forcing an additional redraw, this introduced judder from 25-30 FPS. Based on our observations and testing, it appears that NVIDIA has corrected this in the retail G-Sync panels with an algorithm that intelligently re-scans at even multiples of the input frame rate in order to keep the redraw rate relatively high, and therefore keeping flicker imperceptible – even at very low continuous frame rates.

A few final points before we go:

  • This is not limited to the ROG Swift. All variable refresh panels we have tested (including 4K) see this effect to a more or less degree than reported here. Again, this only occurs when games instantaneously drop to 0 FPS, and not when those games dip into low frame rates in a continuous fashion.
  • The effect is less perceptible (both visually and with recorded data) at lower maximum refresh rate settings.
  • The effect is not present at fixed refresh rates (G-Sync disabled or with non G-Sync panels).

This post was primarily meant as a status update and to serve as something for G-Sync users to point to when attempting to explain the flicker they are perceiving. We will continue researching, collecting data, and coordinating with NVIDIA on this issue, and will report back once we have more to discuss.

During the research and drafting of this piece, we reached out to and worked with NVIDIA to discuss this issue. Here is their statement:

"All LCD pixel values relax after refreshing. As a result, the brightness value that is set during the LCD’s scanline update slowly relaxes until the next refresh.

This means all LCDs have some slight variation in brightness. In this case, lower frequency refreshes will appear slightly brighter than high frequency refreshes by 1 – 2%.

When games are running normally (i.e., not waiting at a load screen, nor a screen capture) - users will never see this slight variation in brightness value. In the rare cases where frame rates can plummet to very low levels, there is a very slight brightness variation (barely perceptible to the human eye), which disappears when normal operation resumes."

So there you have it. It's basically down to the physics of how an LCD panel works at varying refresh rates. While I agree that it is a rare occurrence, there are some games that present this scenario more frequently (and noticeably) than others. If you've noticed this effect in some games more than others, let us know in the comments section below. 

(Editor's Note: We are continuing to work with NVIDIA on this issue and hope to find a way to alleviate the flickering with either a hardware or software change in the future.)

A professional class monitor on a reasonable budget, BenQ BL3200PT

Subject: Displays | November 24, 2014 - 01:53 PM |
Tagged: 2560x1440, mva, benq, BL3200PT, 32, professional monitor

Displays using Multi-domain Vertical Alignment, aka MVA, offer better response times than standard IPS panels and better viewing angle and colour than ones using TN, sitting somewhat in the middle of these two standards in quality and price. BenQ has released an 32", LED backlit 2560x1440 A-MVA display called the BL3200PT with a 100% colour gamut and 1.07 billion colours, aimed at the professional designer on a bit of a budget.  The MSRP of $800 makes it far more affordable than many of the 4K monitors on the market and the use of MVA instead of IPS also helps lower the price without sacrificing too much quality.  The connectivity options are impressive, HDMI, DisplayPort, dual-link DVI, and D-Sub, along with audio, two USB plugs and a card reader should ensure that you can connect this display to the necessary resources and it can be adjusted vertically as well as tilt and swivel and is capable of portrait mode.  Check out Hardware Canucks full review here.


"BenQ's BL3200PT combines a massive screen size with an Advanced-MVA panel to create a monitor that's a perfect fit for optimizing workflow while delivering good color reproduction."

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