Subject: Displays
Manufacturer: ASUS

Introduction, Specifications, and Packaging

AMD fans have been patiently waiting for a proper FreeSync display to be released. The first round of displays using the Adaptive Sync variable refresh rate technology arrived with an ineffective or otherwise disabled overdrive feature, resulting in less than optimal pixel response times and overall visual quality, especially when operating in variable refresh rate modes. Meanwhile G-Sync users had overdrive functionality properly functioning , as well as a recently introduced 1440P IPS panel from Acer. The FreeSync camp was overdue for an IPS 1440P display superior to that first round of releases, hopefully with those overdrive issues corrected. Well it appears that ASUS, the makers of the ROG Swift, have just rectified that situation with a panel we can finally recommend to AMD users:

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Before we get into the full review, here is a sampling of our recent display reviews from both sides of the camp:

  • ASUS PG278Q 27in TN 1440P 144Hz G-Sync
  • Acer XB270H 27in TN 1080P 144Hz G-Sync
  • Acer XB280HK 28in TN 4K 60Hz G-Sync
  • Acer XB270HU 27in IPS 1440P 144Hz G-Sync
  • LG 34UM67 34in IPS 25x18 21:9 48-75Hz FreeSync
  • BenQ XL2730Z 27in TN 1440P 40-144Hz FreeSync
  • Acer XG270HU 27in TN 1440P 40-144Hz FreeSync
  • ASUS MG279Q 27in IPS 1440P 144Hz FreeSync(35-90Hz) < You are here

The reason for there being no minimum rating on the G-Sync panels above is explained in our article 'Dissecting G-Sync and FreeSync - How the Technologies Differ', though the short version is that G-Sync can effectively remain in VRR down to <1 FPS regardless of the hardware minimum of the display panel itself.

Continue reading as we will look at this new ASUS MG279Q 27" 144Hz 1440P IPS FreeSync display!

Seiki and PC Perspective Are Giving Away a Pair of SM40UNP 40-in 4K 60 Hz Monitors!

Subject: Displays | June 18, 2015 - 10:10 AM |
Tagged: video, sm40unp, Seiki Pro, seiki, gleam, giveaway, contest

Earlier today we posted our review of the Seiki Pro SM40UNP monitor, a 40-in behemoth with a 4K resolution and 60 Hz refresh rate. Clearly this is not a monitor for mere mortals: you must have an impressive system to push out the pixels required for a 4K display and also have the desk space for a display that many would considerable sizeable for a TV!

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Not only was Allyn impressed with the color capability of the display and the sheer size of the monitor, it offers some interesting features and capabilities including four simultaneous video inputs! Be sure you check out Allyn's full write up on the display that resulted in a Gold Award from the staff.

But let's get to the important news for this post: Seiki was willing to give us two of these monitors to hand out to our readers and viewers. That's right, two of you will be taking home a 40-in 4K 60 Hz monitor for your gaming PC! (Or for productivity and work, who are we to judge?)

The method is simple:

  1. Fill out the entry form below. You can enter through one or all of the methods listed but the more entries you include the better your chances! Seiki is particular interested to see all the 4K-ready gaming rigs our readers have built!
     
  2. It's stated in the Gleam form but it is worth reiterating here: all entrants will be sent one email from me (Ryan) with a coupon code for Seiki monitors that you can use on a purchase if you don't win one of the giveaways. You are not being signed up for some kind of mailing list or marketing list and your email address will never actually go to Seiki - I will send out the emails myself.
     
  3. The contest is open to anyone in the world. So enter away!
     
  4. The contest will end at 11:59pm on June 19th (EST)

Win a Seiki Pro SM40UNP 40-in 4K 60 Hz Monitor!!

Good luck to all entrants and a HUGE THANKS goes out to Seiki for providing these kick-ass prizes for our readers and viewers!

LG Announces 27MU67-B Monitor: 27-in 4K IPS with AMD FreeSync

Subject: Displays | June 9, 2015 - 01:51 AM |
Tagged: UHD, LG, ips monitor, gaming monitor, freesync, amd, 4k, 27MU67-B

LG announced a new 4K monitor today, and since it's from LG you know there has to be an IPS panel inside.

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The 27MU67-B boasts a 3840x2160 UHD/4K IPS panel and supports AMD FreeSync variable refresh rate technology, though the panel appears to only support up to 60 Hz according to the official specs. Speaking of, here's the full rundown:

Panel

  • Panel Type: IPS
  • Color Gamut (CIE1931): SRGB 99%
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9
  • Resolution: 3840x2160
  • Brightness (cd/m2): 300 cd/m2
  • Contrast Ratio: 5M:1
  • Response Time (GTG): 5ms
  • Refresh Rate: 60 Hz: 178 / 178
  • Viewing Angle: Hard Coating (3H), anti-glare

Inputs/Outputs

  • DVI-D x1
  • HDMI x2
  • Display Port x1

Special Features

  • Black Stabilizer: Black Equalizer
  • DAS Mode: Yes
  • Reader Mode: Yes
  • PC: Yes
  • DDC/CI: Yes
  • HDCP: Yes (2.2)
  • FreeSync: Yes (w/ DP, mDP)
  • Factory Calibration: Yes
  • Super+ Resolution: Yes
  • Screen-split: Yes (Software)
  • Flicker Safe: Yes
  • Pivot: Yes
  • Dual Controller: Yes (Software)

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The 27MU67-B also features factory calibration and 99% sRGB color the display could be used for more critical work (yes, gaming can be categorized as "critical").

The LG 27MU67-B has an MSRP of $599.99 and availability is listed as “coming soon”.

Source: LG
Subject: Displays
Manufacturer: Seiki

Introduction and Specifications

Seiki has spent the past few years making quite the entrance into the display market. Starting with LCD TVs, they seemingly came out of nowhere back in April of 2013 with a 50” 4K display that was available at a very competitive price at that time. Since then, we’ve seen a few more display releases out of Seiki, and they were becoming popular among home theater enthusiasts on a budget and for gamers who wanted a bigger panel in front of them. Last June, Seiki announced a desktop line of 4K monitors. These would not just be repurposed televisions, but ground-up designs intended for desktop professionals and gamers alike. The most eagerly awaited part of this announcement was promised 60 Hz support at 4K resolutions.

Just under a year later, we are happy to bring you a review of the first iteration on this new Seiki Pro lineup:

seikipro1.jpg

Behold, 40 inches of 4K professional desktop display goodness!

Computex 2015: ASUS 3800R 34″ Ultrawide 3440x1440 IPS 21:9 Curved G-SYNC Monitor

Subject: Displays | June 1, 2015 - 12:21 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, gsync, g-sync, asus, 3800R

At Computex this week ASUS is showing off a prototype of the new ROG 3800R monitor,  a 34-in curved display with a 3440x1440 resolution and G-Sync variable refresh rate capability. ASUS claims on its PCDIY blog that the 21:9 aspect ratio was the one of the "most requested" specifications for a new ROG monitor, followed by a curved design. The result is a gorgeous display:

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Here's a list of specifications:

  • 34” optimal dimension for QHD resolutions with 3440×1440 resolution
  • 21:9 ultra-wide aspect ratio for increased immersion and improved horizontal workflow
  • IPS based panel for superior color reproduction, black levels and reduction of color shifting
  • NVIDIA G-SYNC equipped offering smooth, fluid and tear free gaming with improved motion clarity. Additionally equipped with ULMB operating mode for outstanding motion clarity.
  • Frameless design for seamless surround gaming
  • ASUS exclusive GamePlus feature and Turbo Key
  • Ergonomic adjustment including tilt, swivel and height adjustment

Hot damn, we want of these and we want it yesterday! There is no mention of the refresh rate of the display here though we did see information from NVIDIA that ASUS was planning a 34x14 60 Hz screen - but we are not sure this is the same model being shown. And the inclusion of ULMB would normally indicate a refresh rate above 60-75 Hz...

Another interesting note: this monitor appears to include both DisplayPort and HDMI connectivity.

This 34-inch 3800R curved display features wide-viewing angles, a 3440 x 1440 native resolution, and 21:9 aspect ratio. It features NVIDIA® G-SYNC™ display technology to deliver smooth, lag-free visuals. G-SYNC synchronizes the display’s refresh rate to the GPU in any GeForce® GTX™-powered PC to eliminate screen tearing and minimizing display stutter and input lag. This results in sharper, more vibrant images; and more fluid and responsive gameplay. It has extensive connectivity options that include DisplayPort and HDMI.

The above information came from ASUS just a few short hours ago, so you can assume that it is accurate. Could this be the start of panels that integrate dual scalars (G-Sync module plus something else) to offer more connectivity or has the G-Sync module been updated to support more inputs? We'll find out!

NVIDIA G-Sync for Notebooks Announced, No Module Required

Subject: Displays, Mobile | May 31, 2015 - 06:00 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, notebooks, msi, mobile, gsync, g-sync, asus

If you remember back to January of this year, Allyn and posted an article that confirmed the existence of a mobile variant of G-Sync thanks to a leaked driver and an ASUS G751 notebook. Rumors and speculation floated around the Internet ether for a few days but we eventually got official word from NVIDIA that G-Sync for notebooks was a real thing and that it would launch "soon." Well we have that day here finally with the beginning of Computex.

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G-Sync for notebooks has no clever branding, no "G-Sync Mobile" or anything like that, so discussing it will be a bit more difficult since the technologies are different. Going forward NVIDIA claims that any gaming notebook using NVIDIA GeForce GPUs will be a G-Sync notebook and will support all of the goodness that variable refresh rate gaming provides. This is fantastic news as notebook gaming is often at lower frame rates than you would find on a desktop PC because of lower powered hardware yet comparable (1080p, 1440p) resolution displays.

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Of course, as we discovered in our first look at G-Sync for notebooks back in January, the much debated G-Sync module is not required and will not be present on notebooks featuring the variable refresh technology. So what gives? We went over some of this before, but it deserves to be detailed again.

NVIDIA uses the diagram above to demonstrate the complication of the previous headaches presented by the monitor and GPU communication path before G-Sync was released. You had three different components: the GPU, the monitor scalar and the monitor panel that all needed to work together if VRR was going to become a high quality addition to the game ecosystem. 

mobile3.jpg

NVIDIA's answer was to take over all aspects of the pathway for pixels from the GPU to the eyeball, creating the G-Sync module and helping OEMs to hand pick the best panels that would work with VRR technology. This helped NVIDIA make sure it could do things to improve the user experience such as implementing an algorithmic low-frame-rate, frame-doubling capability to maintain smooth and tear-free gaming at frame rates under the panels physical limitations. It also allows them to tune the G-Sync module to the specific panel to help with ghosting and implemention variable overdrive logic. 

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All of this is required because of the incredible amount of variability in the monitor and panel markets today.

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But with notebooks, NVIDIA argues, there is no variability at all to deal with. The notebook OEM gets to handpick the panel and the GPU directly interfaces with the screen instead of passing through a scalar chip. (Note that some desktop monitors like the ever popular Dell 3007WFP did this as well.)  There is no other piece of logic in the way attempting to enforce a fixed refresh rate. Because of that direct connection, the GPU is able to control the data passing between it and the display without any other logic working in the middle. This makes implementing VRR technology much more simple and helps with quality control because NVIDIA can validate the panels with the OEMs.

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As I mentioned above, going forward, all new notebooks using GTX graphics will be G-Sync notebooks and that should solidify NVIDIA's dominance in the mobile gaming market. NVIDIA will be picking the panels, and tuning the driver for them specifically, to implement anti-ghosting technology (like what exists on the G-Sync module today) and low frame rate doubling. NVIDIA also claims that the world's first 75 Hz notebook panels will ship with GeForce GTX and will be G-Sync enabled this summer - something I am definitely looking forward to trying out myself.

Though it wasn't mentioned, I am hopeful that NVIDIA will continue to allow users the ability to disable V-Sync at frame rates above the maximum refresh of these notebook panels. With most of them limited to 60 Hz (but this applies to 75 Hz as well) the most demanding gamers are going to want that same promise of minimal latency.

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At Computex we'll see a handful of models announced with G-Sync up and running. It should be no surprise of course to see the ASUS G751 with the GeForce GTX 980M GPU on this list as it was the model we used in our leaked driver testing back in January. MSI will also launch the GT72 G with a 1080p G-Sync ready display and GTX 980M/970M GPU option. Gigabyte will have a pair of notebooks: the Aorus X7 Pro-SYNC with GTX 970M SLI and a 1080p screen as well as the Aorus X5 with a pair of GTX 965M in SLI and a 3K resolution (2560x1440) screen. 

This move is great for gamers and I am eager to see what the resulting experience is for users that pick up these machines. I have long been known as a proponent of variable refresh displays and getting access to that technology on your notebook is a victory for NVIDIA's team.

NVIDIA G-Sync Update: New Monitors, Windowed Mode, V-Sync Options

Subject: Displays | May 31, 2015 - 06:00 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, gsync, g-sync, computex 2015, computex

In conjunction with the release of the new GeForce GTX 980 Ti graphics card today, NVIDIA is making a handful of other announcements around the GeForce brand. The most dramatic of the announcements center around the company's variable refresh monitor technology called G-Sync. I assume that any of you reading this are already intimately familiar with what G-Sync is, but if not, check out this story that dives into how it compares with AMD's rival tech called FreeSync.

First, NVIDIA is announcing a set of seven new G-Sync ready monitors that will be available this summer and fall from ASUS and Acer.

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Many of these displays offer configurations of panels we haven't yet seen in a G-Sync display. Take the Acer X34 for example: this 34-in monitor falls into the 21:9 aspect ratio form factor, with a curved screen and a 3440x1440 resolution. The refresh rate will peak at 75 Hz while also offering the color consistency and viewing angles of an IPS screen. This is the first 21:9, the first 34x14 and the first curved monitor to support G-Sync, and with a 75 Hz maximum refresh it should provide a solid gaming experience. ASUS has a similar model, the PG34Q, though it peaks at a refresh rate of 60 Hz.

ASUS will be updating the wildly popular ROG Swift PG278Q display with the PG279Q, another 27-in monitor with a 2560x1440 resolution. Only this time it will run at 144 Hz with an IPS screen rather than TN, again resulting in improved color clarity, viewing angles and lower eye strain. 

Those of you on the look out for 4K panels with G-Sync support will be happy to find IPS iterations of that configuration but still will peak at 60 Hz refresh - as much a limitation of DisplayPort as anything else though. 

Another technology addition for G-Sync with the 352-series (353-series, sorry!) driver released today is support for windowed mode variable refresh.

gsync-windows.jpg

By working some magic with the DWM (Desktop Window Manager), NVIDIA was able to allow for VRR to operate without requiring a game to be in full screen mode. For gamers that like to play windowed or borderless windowed while using secondary or large displays for other side activities, this is a going to a great addition to the G-Sync portfolio. 

Finally, after much harassment and public shaming, NVIDIA is finally going to allow users the choice to enable or disable V-Sync when your game render rate exceeds the maximum refresh rate of the G-Sync monitor it is attached to.

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One of the complaints about G-Sync has been that it is restrictive on the high side of the VRR window for its monitors. While FreeSync allowed you to selectively enable or disable V-Sync when your frame rate goes above the maximum refresh rate, G-Sync was forcing users into a V-Sync enabled state. The reasoning from NVIDIA was that allowing for horizontal tearing of any kind with G-Sync enabled would ruin the experience and/or damage the technology's reputation. But now, while the default will still be to keep V-Sync on, gamers will be able to manually set the V-Sync mode to off with a G-Sync monitor.

Why is this useful? Many gamers believe that a drawback to V-Sync enabled gaming is the added latency of waiting for a monitor to refresh before drawing a frame that might be ready to be shown to the user immediately. G-Sync fixes this from frame rates of 1 FPS to the maximum refresh of the G-Sync monitor (144 FPS, 75 FPS, 60 FPS) but now rather than be stuck with tear-free, but latency-added V-Sync when gaming over the max refresh, you'll be able to play with tearing on the screen, but lower input latency. This could be especially useful for gamers using 60 Hz G-Sync monitors with 4K resolutions.

Oh, actually one more thing: you'll now be able to enable ULMB (ultra low motion blur) mode in the driver as well without requiring entry into your display's OSD.

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NVIDIA is also officially announcing G-Sync for notebooks at Computex. More on that in this story!

LG 27MU67: 27-inch, 4K, IPS, FreeSync Monitor

Subject: Displays | May 29, 2015 - 04:59 PM |
Tagged: LG, ips, freesync, 4k

LG Australia published a product page for their LG 27MU67 monitor, which the rest of the company doesn't seem to acknowledge the existence of. It is still online, even after three days worth of time that someone could have used to pull the plug. This one is interesting for a variety of reasons: it's 4K, it's IPS, and it supports AMD FreeSync. It is also relatively cheap for that combination, being listed at $799 AUD RRP.

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Some websites have converted that to ~$610 to $620 USD, but it might even be less than that. Australian prices are often listed with their federal tax rolled in, which would yield a price that is inflated about 10%. It is possible, though maybe wishful thinking, that this monitor could retail in the ~$500 to $550 price range for the United States (if it even comes to North America). Again, this is a 4K, IPS, FreeSync panel.

Very little is posted on LG's website and thus it is hard to tell how good of an IPS panel this is. It is listed as 99% SRGB coverage, which is good for typical video but not the best if you are working on printed content, such as magazine illustrations. On the other hand, this is a gaming panel, not a professional one. Update (May 29, 2015): It also has 10-bit (per channel) color. It sounds like it is true 10-bit, not just a look-up table, but I should note that it doesn't explicitly say that.

Again, pricing and availability is up in the air, because this is not an official announcement. It is listed to launch in Australia for $799 AUD, though.

Source: LG Australia

Stop by for the BenQ XL2730Z FreeSync display, stay for the conversations

Subject: Displays | May 21, 2015 - 01:44 PM |
Tagged: XL2730Z, freesync, benq, amd

Ryan wasn't the only one to test BenQ's XL2730Z 27-in 2560x1440 144 Hz FreeSync Monitor, The Tech Report also had a chance to test one, as well as talk to NVIDIA's Tom Petersen about their competing technology.  They also had a chance to discuss FreeSync in general with AMD's David Glen who is one of the engineers behind FreeSync.  Their benchmarks and overall impression of the displays capabilities and FreeSync in general are a major portion of the review but the discussion with the two company representatives makes for even more interesting reading.

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"AMD's FreeSync is here, personified in BenQ's XL2730Z monitor. We've gone deep into the display's performance and smoothness, with direct comparisons to G-Sync using 240-fps video. Here's what we found."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

Oculus Rift "Full Rift Experience" Specifications Released

Subject: Graphics Cards, Processors, Displays, Systems | May 15, 2015 - 03:02 PM |
Tagged: Oculus, oculus vr, nvidia, amd, geforce, radeon, Intel, core i5

Today, Oculus has published a list of what they believe should drive their VR headset. The Oculus Rift will obviously run on lower hardware. Their minimum specifications, published last month and focused on the Development Kit 2, did not even list a specific CPU or GPU -- just a DVI-D or HDMI output. They then went on to say that you really should use a graphics card that can handle your game at 1080p with at least 75 fps.

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The current list is a little different:

  • NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970 / AMD Radeon R9 290 (or higher)
  • Intel Core i5-4590 (or higher)
  • 8GB RAM (or higher)
  • A compatible HDMI 1.3 output
  • 2x USB 3.0 ports
  • Windows 7 SP1 (or newer).

I am guessing that, unlike the previous list, Oculus has a more clear vision for a development target. They were a little unclear about whether this refers to the consumer version or the current needs of developers. In either case, it would likely serve as a guide for what they believe developers should target when the consumer version launches.

This post also coincides with the release of the Oculus PC SDK 0.6.0. This version pushes distortion rendering to the Oculus Server process, rather than the application. It also allows multiple canvases to be sent to the SDK, which means developers can render text and other noticeable content at full resolution, but scale back in places that the user is less likely to notice. They can also be updated at different frequencies, such as sleeping the HUD redraw unless a value changes.

The Oculus PC SDK (0.6.0) is now available at the Oculus Developer Center.

Source: Oculus