Author:
Manufacturer: Corsair

Little. Yellow. Different.

Corsair just can't help themselves, they just can't stop building new cases. Obsidian, Carbide, Graphite; the obsession is never ending it seems. That's good news for enthusiasts though as Corsair's entries to the case market have almost always been high quality. Today's official launch of the Graphite 380T, available in yellow, black and white color schemes, brings yet another entry to the Mini-ITX form factor. It's a market that has been getting a lot of attention lately and one that requires more careful thought in design.

With a price of $139-149 depending on color, the Graphite 380T isn't a cheap case by most users descriptions but it is quite unique - both from the look and style as well as the implementation of components. You get a 3-speed fan controller as well as an interior dome light that adds a little character to an exterior that will already get a lot attention. And maybe some comparisons to a Dewalt portable worksite stereo.

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The front panel removes with a simple spring-loaded click release and acts as both air inlet and filter for the large 140mm fan included up front.

Continue looking through pictures of the Corsair Graphite 380T Mini ITX Case!!

Manufacturer: Cooler Master

Welcome Back to Part 2

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(Courtesy of Cooler Master)

Welcome back to the second part of our Cooler Master HAF Stacker Series case review. In Part 1 we took a detailed look at the construction, specifications, and features of the HAF Stacker 935 and HAF Stacker 915R/F enclosures.

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HAF Stacker 935 Mod-Tower Enclosure

Cooler Master’s new HAF Stacker modular cases offer great flexibility and expandability. You can easily build a dual system in one enclosure by installing a full-size ATX system in the lower mid-tower section with a complete, self-contained mini-ITX system in the HAF 915 chassis up top. The HAF Stacker modular design offers tremendous room with virtually unlimited options for serious water-cooling. And if you want even more room, you can stack HAF case modules on top of each other in a virtually endless combinations!

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Dual Peltier Water Chiller

Now in Part 2, we are going to complete our review by checking out component installation, building two complete systems in the Stacker cases (full ATX gaming rig and a mini-ITX based system), and look at various cooling options including the potential to house a full-blown water-cooling system with a Thermoelectric (TEC) water chiller.

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HAF Stacker 915R/F Stackable Enclosures

Please continue reading Part 2 of our CM HAF 935 Case review!!!

Son of Gamer Xtreme; the Cooler Master 650W GXII

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 25, 2014 - 01:12 PM |
Tagged: cooler master, GXII, PSU, 650W, 80 Plus Bronze

[H]ard|OCP was a little leery about the reappearance of Cooler Master's Game Xtreme series PSU after the first generations poor performance and even more so when they read the labelling on the new 650W model.  While it claims that its single 12V rail will power "the most demanding SLI/CF configurations", the 624W @ 52A maximum power rating is not up to handling multiple Titans nor does it help that there are only two 6+2 PCIe power connectors.  However it is not the PR that matters but how well it can compete against other PSUs with similar power ratings.  Once [H] hooked it up in their torture chamber it became clear that this PSU was not up to the job, about the only good thing they could spot was that it failed less tests than the first generation which does not count as a hearty recommendation.

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"Cooler Master is a name synonymous with enthusiast computer desktop builds. You have likely purchased one if not more of its products in the past if you build your own boxes. The GXII line popped up on our radar recently, as we were seeing it on many brick and mortar computer store shelves, so we bought one to see what it is made of."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: [H]ard|OCP
Manufacturer: PC Perspective

Introduction

Introduction

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Since the introduction of the Haswell line of CPUs, the Internet has been aflame with how hot the CPUs run. Speculation ran rampant on the cause with theories abounding about the lesser surface area and inferior thermal interface material (TIM) in between the CPU die surface and the underside of the CPU heat spreader. It was later confirmed that Intel had changed the TIM interfacing the CPU die surface to the heat spreader with Haswell, leading to the hotter than expected CPU temperatures. This increase in temperature led to inconsistent core-to-core temperatures as well as vastly inferior overclockability of the Haswell K-series chips over previous generations.

A few of the more adventurous enthusiasts took it upon themselves to use inventive ways to address the heat concerns surrounding the Haswell by delidding the processor. The delidding procedure involves physically removing the heat spreader from the CPU, exposing the CPU die. Some individuals choose to clean the existing TIM from the core die and heat spreader underside, applying superior TIM such as metal or diamond-infused paste or even the Coollaboratory Liquid Ultra metal material and fixing the heat spreader back in place. Others choose a more radical solution, removing the heat spreader from the equation entirely for direct cooling of the naked CPU die. This type of cooling method requires use of a die support plate, such as the MSI Die Guard included with the MSI Z97 XPower motherboard.

Whichever outcome you choose, you must first remove the heat spreader from the CPU's PCB. The heat spreader itself is fixed in place with black RTV-type material ensuring a secure and air-tight seal, protecting the fragile die from outside contaminants and influences. Removal can be done in multiple ways with two of the most popular being the razor blade method and the vise method. With both methods, you are attempting to separate the CPU PCB from the heat spreader without damaging the CPU die or components on the top or bottom sides of the CPU PCB.

Continue reading editorial on delidding your Haswell CPU!!

Colorful New BitFenix Prodigy M Cases With Optional Side Windows Coming Soon

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 22, 2014 - 09:03 PM |
Tagged: prodigy m, mATX, bitfenix

In response to customer feedback, BitFenix has announced new color options and optional windowed side panels for its Prodigy M chassis. New versions of the Micro ATX case will be available later this month in Fire Red, Atomic Orange, Vivid Green, and Cobalt Blue with or without a case window (which can also be available separately). The new color choices join the existing Arctic White and Midnight Black Prodigy M cases.

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The Prodigy M (including the new color versions) is essentially a larger version of the Prodigy chassis intended to support Micro ATX motherboards and dual graphics cards. BitFenix's steel and plastic Prodigy M chassis measures 250mm x 404mm x 359mm (~9.8"x15.9"x14.1") and features the company's "FyberFlex" flexible carrying handles on the top and bottom (the bottom handles do double duty as case feet) and SofTouch exterior finish. Two audio jacks, two USB 3.0 ports, and a single externally-accessible 5.25" drive bay round out the external I/O.

The case comes bundled with two 120mm Spectre fans installed in the rear and bottom fan mounts. Beyond that, users can add a slim 240mm radiator (27mm thick with a single GPU installed) up top and swap out the included rear fan for a larger 140mm model.

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The Prodigy M supports Mini ITX and Micro ATX motherboards, a bottom mounted power supply up to 160mm long, CPU coolers up to 160mm tall (with the storage rack installed), and graphics cards as long as 320mm (there are five PCI slots in total). Using the bottom case mounts, users can have two 3.5" drives and two 2.5" drives. Additionally, users can install the removable storage rack (which mounts above the motherboard for an extra two 3.5" drives and three 2.5" drives. There is also a 5.25" drive bay which could house additional storage drives with the right adapter.

BitFenix also announced the availability of windowed side panels that come in each of the six case colors. The windowed side panels will be sold along with windowed versions of the Prodigy M case or as a separate purchase that customers can add to their existing black or white Prodigy M.

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The new Prodigy M Color cases will be available later this month for around $100. There is no word on pricing for the individual windowed side panels, however. 

It is nice to see BitFenix responding to customer feedback, and the new colorful cases seem to be a welcome update to the series.

Source: BitFenix

Cooler Master Elite 110; a small case for a small price

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 21, 2014 - 01:46 PM |
Tagged: cooler master, Elite 110, Casewarmer, mini-itx

A few months ago Lee reviewed the $40 Cooler Master Elite 110 and with the recent resurgence of mini-ITX systems it is worth revisiting this case.  Measuring 8.2" x 10.3" x 11.1" (208 x 260 x 280 mm) it is a rather small enclosure which will lead to a crowded interior but a stylish looking and easy to place system.  As you are limited to a 3" tall heatsink The Tech Report opted to go with watercooling as you can just squeeze a 120mm radiator in; in this case the Seidon 120V.  The A10-7850K based "Casewarmer" was installed and with some tweaking The Tech Report managed to keep temperature and sound levels within a decent range but you should consider your cooling components with the knowledge that this case can get warm and loud without the right fans and heatsink.

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"Cooler Master's Elite 110 is a tiny case with a price to match. Is it a good value? We loaded it up with parts and ran it through our testing gauntlet to find out."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Manufacturer: Cooler Master

Introduction and Features

Introduction

Today we are going from one extreme to another. Two months ago we took an in-depth look at Cooler Master’s Elite 110 enclosure, which is a compact small form-factor case designed to house a mini-ITX system. Now we are going to the opposite end of the spectrum and will be taking a detailed look at the largest case Cooler Master (or most anyone else for that matter) has released to date, the HAF Stacker 935 Modular-Tower Case. In addition, the good folks at Cooler Master sent along a HAF Stacker 915F to show off how easy it is to expand a HAF Stacker system by adding one or more HAF Stacker case modules.

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(Courtesy of Cooler Master)

Because this case is so large (we will actually be reviewing three different cases together: HAF 915F, 925 mid, and 915R) we are going to split the review into two parts. In Part 1 we are taking a detailed look at the three chassis (features, specifications, etc.) and the in Part 2 we will start installing parts and build a full-size ATX system along with a mini-ITX system and also look at various cooling solutions.  

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CM HAF Stacker 935 (HAF 925/HAF 915R)                   (3) HAF 915s Stacked

The Cooler Master HAF Stacker 935 case consists of two pieces: a HAF 925 Mid-Tower enclosure and a HAF 915R mini-ITX case stacked together. The HAF 935 comes with the 915 mini-ITX chassis mounted on top of the HAF 925 Mid-Tower case but you can swap them around if you like because all of the HAF Stacker Series cases are interchangeable. This offers great flexibility for building multi-PCs in one chassis and provides a large amount of room for mounting all sorts of components like high-end water cooling systems, huge HDD arrays, etc. The HAF Stacker series can provide an excellent base system for some extreme case modding if desired.

Please continue reading our CM HAF Stacker 935 Case review!

Corsair Commander Mini Provides Ultimate Control of PC Cooling, Lighting, and Performance

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 19, 2014 - 12:16 PM |
Tagged: corsair, corsair commander, Corsair Link, Corsair Link Digital

You are probably already familiar with the Corsair Link functionality in Corsair "i" series of PSUs as well as their self contained watercoolers which allows intelligent fan control from a software control panel.  Corsair Commander is an expansion of that tool, allowing control of fans and LEDs in addition to your PSU and CPU cooler, as long as they bear the Corsair Link Digital decal.  For $60 you can think of it as a powerful, if specialized, fan controller with a few other tricks up its sleeve.

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FREMONT, California —August 19, 2014 — Corsair, a worldwide leader in high-performance PC hardware components, today announced the availability of the Corsair Commander Mini control unit. The compact Commander Mini gives users the ability to connect and control multiple lights, fans, and other Corsair devices with an intuitive software interface.

Corsair Commander Mini
The Corsair Commander Mini is a centralized control unit for Corsair Link PC control and monitoring system. Equipped with four Corsair Link Digital ports, six fan control connectors, four temperature probe inputs, and a port for connecting Corsair Link LED lighting strips, Corsair Commander Mini lets users take complete control of their PC’s lighting and cooling. The unit is easy to install with an included mounting kit and connects to your PC via a standard SATA connector for power and an included cable to connect it to a USB 2.0 header on the PC’s motherboard.

Corsair Link gives ultimate PC control
Corsair Link marks an end to the days of case fans, component fans and case lighting that must be managed manually with hardware switches and dials, while simultaneously offering more advanced control and expansion options than motherboard BIOS settings. Everything is configurable from the PC’s desktop via the Corsair Link Dashboard software interface.

Precise Monitoring
Users can see how a system is operating at a glance with an unprecedented level of detail. Coolant temperature, ambient temperature (at multiple points), and the speed of case fans and fans built-in to compatible system components can be monitored, all via the Corsair Link Dashboard software.

A New Level of Control
Corsair Link gives PC users the power to manage fan speeds individually, set up customized cooling profiles, or program fans to respond to changes in ambient or component temperature. Lighting can be programmed to relay critical system information or to change the look of the system to provide an instant visual indicator of the selected cooling profile, or just for fun.

Expandable Eco-System
The Commander Mini fan controllers work with virtually any standard PC case fan, and the included temperature sensors can be placed nearly anywhere in a PC case. Expand your control by adding compatible peripherals, including Corsair i-Series liquid CPU coolers, i-Series power supplies, and DRAM cooling systems which feature the Corsair Link Digital logo.

Source: Corsair

Also, Corsair's Cherry MX RGB Launch Date Changed

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling | August 18, 2014 - 10:02 PM |
Tagged: corsair, mechanical keyboard, cherry mx rgb

So I actually did not see this until after I published the Razer story. Just a few hours ago, Corsair posted an announcement to their Facebook page that claimed a "cbange" in launch date for their Cherry MX RGB-based keyboards. I actually forgot that the K70 RGB Red was supposed to be out already, with availability listed as "late July" (the rest were scheduled to arrive in "late August"). Corsair does not yet have a new date, but will comment "in a few weeks".

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Got to say, that does look nice.

While, again, no further details are given, it sounds like a technical hurdle is holding back the launch. Corsair claims that they want the product to live up to expectations. This, of course, chips further at the company's exclusivity window and could put them in direct competition with Razer's custom design, and may even be available second, almost in spite of the exclusivity arrangement.

Razer BlackWidow Ultimate Chroma Announced

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling | August 18, 2014 - 09:17 PM |
Tagged: razer, mechanical keyboard

Earlier in the year, we reported on Corsair's exclusivity over Cherry MX RGB-based mechanical keyboards. The thing is, Razer develops their own switches and is not reliant on ZF Electronics (Cherry Corporation). The Razer BlackWidow Ultimate Chroma mechanical keyboard uses their own switches, not Cherry's, and is not subject to Corsair's exclusivity. The keyboard can be ordered now for $179.99 USD and will be available in September.

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I contacted Razer and asked them about their technology. They could not provide any direct comparison between their design and the Cherry MX RGB, but they were able to add a few details to their offering. The BlackWidow Ultimate Chroma was designed with its LEDs positioned away from moving parts and lined up with the keycap imprint. The LEDs are pointed upward for brightness.

Razer will be providing developers with Chroma SDK, allowing games and applications to control the Chroma-enabled device lighting to assist or immerse their users. I say "Chroma-enabled device" rather than "Chroma keyboards", because they already have plans for mice and headsets with the same technology. At the very least, they expect that users will appreciate coordinated colors across their gaming peripherals.

The Razer BlackWidow Ultimate Chroma is available to order, for $179.99 USD ($199.99 CDN), and ships in September. A Chroma-enabled mouse, based on the DeathAdder design, and a Chroma-enabled headset, based on the Kraken model, are announced but do not yet have pricing or availability information.

Source: Razer