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Manufacturer: Corsair

Introduction and Features

Introduction

Corsair continues to expand their extensive power supply lineup with the addition of two new small form factor (SFX) units, the SF450 and SF600. The SF Series power supplies are fully modular and optimized for quiet operation and high efficiency. Both power supplies feature Zero RPM Fan Mode, which means the fan doesn’t start to spin until the power supply is under a moderate to heavy load. The SF450 and SF600 are 80 Plus Gold certified for high efficiency and come with a 5-year warranty.

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While the SF Series is designed for use in small form factor enclosures, Corsair’s SF Series power supplies can also be used in standard ATX cases to save room via the optional SFX to ATX adapter bracket. As you can see in the photo below, the SF Series power supply is much smaller in all three dimensions than a standard ATX power supply. We will be taking a detailed look at the new SF600W power supply in this review.

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SF Series 600W vs. ATX Series 650W

Corsair SF Series 600W PSU Key Features:

•    Small Form Factor (SFX) design
•    Very quiet with Zero RPM Fan Mode
•    92mm cooling fan optimized for low noise
•    80 Plus Gold certified for high efficiency
•    All-modular, flat ribbon-style cables
•    100% all Japanese made 105°C capacitors
•    ATX12V v2.4 and EPS 2.92 compliant
•    6th Generation Intel Core processor Ready
•    Safety Protections: OCP, OVP, UVP, SCP, OTP, and OPP
•    7-Year warranty

Please continue reading our review of the Corsair SF Series 600W PSU!!!

iBuypower Demos Project Snowblind

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 7, 2016 - 08:30 AM |
Tagged: project snowblind, ibuypower

So... how an LCD works is quite interesting. They do not produce light, but rather, they block it. On televisions and monitors, they are put in front of colored filters that, themselves, are in front of a white (give-or-take) light source. When they are fully open, you see the subpixel's value of red, green, or blue. When they are fully closed, you see as black as the panel is capable of producing.

This brings us to Project Snowblind, which iBuypower demoed at Computex 2016. Again, we didn't have a physical presence there (Ryan was about 500 miles away in Macau at the time) but other sites did, so we're embedding PCGamer's video below. Basically, they put an LCD panel -- just the shutter part -- on the case's side window. This allows them to output a mask over the view into your components, even with animation. They apparently even successfully made it tint the light as it passes through somehow.

Video Credit: PCGamer

The technology currently dedicates an HDMI port to itself, which could be a scarce resource for multi-monitor users with a single graphics card, but a USB version is expected at some point. It's purely aesthetic, but I could see it having a practical, aesthetic purpose: dimming. I'm not sure if iBuypower will officially support this, but I could see users outputting black, or even just a really deep shade of grey, onto their case windows if they want to, say, darken the room to view a movie.

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Currently no word on pricing, availability, or the like.

Source: PCGamer

Silverstone's TD02-E, decent all round and easy on the pocket

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 6, 2016 - 04:01 PM |
Tagged: water cooling, Tundra Series, TD02-E, Silverstone, cpu cooler, All-in-One cooler

A few years back you may remember that  Morry did a review of the SilverStone Tundra Series TD02 AiO watercooler.  More recently, Modders Inc reviewed the newer model the TD02-E, part of their high performance line.  The waterblock is compatible most modern processors but you will need a decent sized case to accommodate the radiator as it measures 278x124x27mm with two 120mm fans. The cooler performed admirably, especially for its ~$90 price tag and did so at reasonable noise levels, going full out at 2500RPM it measured  50.2 dBA, or 38dBA at a more modest 1400RPM.

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"Silverstone Technologies has made quite a career making cooling solutions for the PC DIY market. Their solutions are also quite often a unique alternative with out-of-the-box oriented ideas and far from having a "me too" design philosophy. With the all-in-one liquid cooling solution's popularity, Silverstone also has thrown their hat in the ring with alternatives from the typical Asetek OEM"

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: Modders Inc

FSP's new Hydro X series; technically the less expensive model?

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 6, 2016 - 02:55 PM |
Tagged: fsp, PSU, Hydro X, 650W, 80 Plus Gold

With all the hoopla and brouhaha caused by Computex last week some smaller launches were missed, such as the FSP Hydro X 650W PSU.  This particular PSU is non-modular but does carry a five year warranty, an 80 Plus Gold rating and a single 12V rail capable of providing 649.92W @ 54.16A.  [H]ard|OCP's testing showed it to be a solid PSU, providing stable power and meeting with the claimed standards.  Unfortunately there is currently a bit of an issue, though FSP is working to resolve it.  This PSU sells for $95 but the previous fully modular model can be picked up for $85 or less, even though the MSRP is technically higher.  [H] reached out to FSP about this issue and you can see how they plan to resolve the issue in the full review.

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"FSP does not have much to say about its Hydro X in terms of marketing speak, but it does hit the high points that enthusiast system builders are looking for: "Silent operation, High efficiency ≧ 90%, Full Japan-made electrolytic capacitors, Powerful single +12V rail design, Ribbon cables, and Complete protection: OCP, OVP, SCP, OPP, OTP."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Introduction

Fractal Design has reduced their excellent Define S enclosure all the way down from ATX to mini-ITX, and the Define Nano S offers plenty of room for a small form-factor case.

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Large mini-ITX cases have become the trend in the past year or so, with the NZXT Manta the most recent (and possibly the most extreme) example. Fractal Design's Nano S isn't quite as large as the Manta, but it is cavernous inside thanks to a completely open internal layout. There are no optical drive bays, no partitions for PSU or storage, and really not much of anything inside the main compartment at all as Fractal Design has essentially miniaturized the Define S enclosure.

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We have the windowed version of the Define Nano S for review here, which adds some interest to a very understated design. There is still something very sophisticated about this sort of industrial design, and I must admit to liking it quite a bit myself. Details such as the side vents for front panel air intake do add some interest, and that big window helps add some style as well (and builders could always add some increasingly ubiquitous RGB lighting inside!).

Continue reading our review of the Fractal Design Define Nano S enclosure!!

SilverStone Announces SX800-LTI 800W Titanium SFX-L Power Supply

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 6, 2016 - 08:03 AM |
Tagged: SX800-LTI, small form-factor, Silverstone, SFX-L, SFX, SFF, PSU, power supply, computex 2016, computex, 80 Plus Titanium

SilverStone introduced a 700W SFX-L power supply at CES in January, and with that SX700-LPT PSU now officially released the company has raised the bar again as no less than 800W is coming to the SFX-L form-factor.

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Image credit: TechPowerUp

SilverStone's SX800-LTI not only offers a massive 800W, but does so with an 80 PLUS Titanium certification (!). The power supply pushes this massive wattage along a single +12V rail, and the SX800-LTI features a fully-modular design for a clean build. An added benefit to the SFX-L form-factor, other than the potential for these powerful designs, is the use of a 120 mm fan, which allows for much quieter operation under load compared to the smaller SFX variant.

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Image credit: TechPowerUp

We are now approaching full ATX power with these SFX-L PSUs, and indeed the 800-850W range should be all most users would need for even a dual-GPU system (especially as we enter the era of 14-16nm GPUs with their lower power requirements).

No word yet on price or availability.

Source: TechPowerUp

Antec Makes Large Coolers. No-one Tell Morry.

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 4, 2016 - 11:32 PM |
Tagged: fanless, cpu cooler, antec

The folks down at FanlessTech found a giant heatsink that Antec showed off at Computex. It consists of three large stacks of aluminum, weighing about 3lbs, with potentially four fans moving air slowly across it. The original post doesn't mention whether it could be used in a fanless mode, but come on. It should be able to cool something without a fan directly attached to it.

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Image Credit: GDM.or.jp

They don't seem to have price, availability, or even a model number yet, so details are scarce. It will have at least three colors, black, gold, and red, though, so you have a choice about how it will look in your case. Well, at least mostly in your case.

Update (June 5th @ 2:20pm): Turns out that I forgot to add the dimensions and specifications of this cooler. Its total size is 165mm x 142mm x 159mm. Its intended fans spin at 800-1800 RPM. At 800 RPM, they push 12.36 cubic feet per minute of air at 17.5 dBA. At 1800 RPM, they push 65.23 cubic feet per minute of air 25.9 dBA.

Computex 2016: Wooting One Analog Keyboard

Subject: Cases and Cooling, Systems | June 4, 2016 - 05:39 PM |
Tagged: gaming keyboard

Wooting, a start-up that is currently running an already-funded Kickstarter, is looking to produce a keyboard with analog inputs. This is not exactly an entirely-new concept. Ben Heck created one back in 2012 by modifying the WASD cluster to include Hall Effect sensors, which were attached to the guts of an Xbox 360 controller to signal thumbstick offsets. The further you press the key, the more intense of an input would be sent to the PC.

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The Wooting One, which, again, is a Kickstarter campaign, does it a bit more... professionally. The keyboard uses the “Flaretech” switch, which I've never heard of before now, from Taiwanese manufacturer Adomax. Unlike Ben Heck's Hall Effect sensors, this one measures offset with light sensing. This raises a petty, pedantic argument about whether it's technically a mechanical keyboard, since the activation isn't performed by a direct, mechanical process, but users typically equate “mechanical keyboard” with its quality and feel, which could be achieved with non-mechanical processes. Semantics aside, the light-sensing mechanism allows precise measurement of how far down the key is. From there, it's just a matter of mapping that distance to an input.

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This is where the Wooting One looks quite interesting. The firmware and driver will communicate under XInput and apparently other Gamepad APIs, functioning under most games that allow simultaneous gamepad + keyboard input for a single player. They are also expecting to create an open-source system, with an API, that allows games to access the analog input of apparently all keys on the board. This is interesting, because XInput has fairly restrictive limitations of about six axises of analog input (although the two axises corresponding to the triggers are lower precision and, with the Xbox One controller, joined into a single axis). A new API can circumvent all of this for gaming going forward, and it will be required for analog keyboards to get off the ground. It's not a difficult task itself, as there is quite a bit of bandwidth in external IO connections these days, but getting and entire industry's worth of vendors to agree could be a task (unless you're, like, Microsoft). Hopefully it's open, with a permissive license, and a few, big-name engine vendors add support to push it forward.

And, let's be honest -- XInput is limiting. A new API could be good for obscure gamepads, too.

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Outside of analog gaming, they are also milking this “know how far down the key is” feature as much as they can. For instance, they are also allowing users to choose the activation distance in digital mode. Users can set their balance between rejecting partial presses and speed of input based on their ability to touch type.

It's a European Kickstarter, and the lowest backer tier that includes the keyboard ships in November and is worth 100 Euro, ~$115 USD. which apparently includes tax and shipping for North America and Europe. That doesn't correlate to a retail price, if the product even gets off the ground, but it's a data point however reliable. Tax-in and free shipping sounds a bit... sketchy for a crowdfunding campaign... but that could just be a sign that they're more affiliated with an existing company (and its supply chain) than they're letting on, rather than business naivety.

Seasonic Announces PRIME Titanium Series Power Supplies

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 2, 2016 - 09:26 AM |
Tagged: Seasonic PRIME, seasonic, PSU, power supply, 80 Plus Titanium

Seasonic has announced the PRIME Titanium Series line of power supplies, 80 Plus Titanium certified PSUs that the company says offers superior power regulation with "super-low" ripple noise and extended hold-up times to ensure clean power to your system.

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"The culmination of the PRIME Series is the result of Sea Sonic’s close collaboration with graphics card manufacturers and suppliers during product development. Undoubtedly, the electrical performance of the series is unsurpassed by any analog power supply on the market today.

Seasonic PRIME Series power supplies are made with the best quality components, employ an innovative circuit design, and go through rigorous testing to ensure each unit’s amazing load regulation, performance and efficiency. Clean power and prolonged hold-up time (that doubles the current industry standard) are the main characteristics for the ultimate stable performance of the PRIME series power supplies."

Main features of the PRIME Series power supplies from Seasonic:

  • 80 PLUS Titanium or Platinum Certified 
  • Premium Hybrid Fan Control (fanless up to 45 % system load)
  • Micro Tolerance Load Regulation (0.5 %)
  • Extended Hold-up Time (above 30 ms)
  • Ten Year Warranty

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The power supplies also offer modular construction and are available in 850W, 750W, and 650W versions. As to pricing and availability, we don't have specifics just yet.

You can visit Seasonic's PRIME Series website here for more information, and full specifications.

Source: Seasonic

be quiet! Introduces Silent Loop Liquid CPU Coolers

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 1, 2016 - 10:34 PM |
Tagged: water cooler, Silent Series, liquid cooler, cpu cooler, computex 2016, computex, be quiet!, AIO

More be quiet! news from Computex as the company has introduced their first all-in-one liquid CPU coolers with the Silent Loop series; “silence-optimized” liquid coolers ranging from 120mm - 280mm.

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Here are some of the features from be quiet!:

  • Newly designed reverse-flow pump for virtually inaudible operation
  • No vibrating noise
  • Very quiet Pure Wings 2 PWM fans
  • High performance full copper radiator
  • Compact and flat pump design
  • Refill port
  • 3-year warranty

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The Silent Loop coolers are available in three sizes; 120 mm, 240 mm, and 280 mm.

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Here’s the preliminary cost breakdown (prices are not yet final according to be quiet!):

120mm / MSRP: $109.99
240mm / MSRP: $129.90
280mm / MSRP: $149.90

The Silent Loop liquid coolers are slated for a September 2016 launch.

Source: be quiet!