Manufacturer: High Power

Introduction and Features


In this review we will be taking a detailed look at High Power’s new Astro GD 1200W power supply. All of the power supplies in the Astro GD Series are fully modular, have a single +12V output, and are 80 Plus Gold certified for high efficiency. There are currently sixteen different power supplies in the Astro Series and nine models in the fully modular Astro GD Series. The new AGD-1200F is king of the hill with the highest rated output of 1,200 watts.


Along with 80 Plus Gold certified high efficiency, the Astro GD1200W power supply has been designed for quiet operation. It uses a dual ball bearing 135mm fan and a smart fan speed control, which automatically switches between two operating modes: silent mode and cooling mode. Unlike some other power supplies that keep the fan turned off during low output, the AGD-1200 fan spins all the time. The Smart Fan Control adjusts the fan operation mode automatically according to the system loading and ambient temperature for quiet operation. The fan speed starts out slow and quiet and gradually ramps up as the load increases. The PSU also incorporates an off-delay fan feature that keeps the fan spinning for a few seconds after the system is turned off.


High Power Astro GD-1200W PSU Key Features:

•    1,200W continuous DC output
•    80 PLUS Gold certified (87%~90% efficiency at 20-100% load)
•    Silent Design (automatically adjusts between silent and cooling modes)
•    Advanced DC-to-DC converters (3.3V and 5V)
•    Fully modular cables for easy installation
•    Flat ribbon-style, low profile cables help optimize airflow
•    High quality components including all Japanese made capacitors
•    Active Power Factor correction (0.99) with Universal AC input
•    Safety Protections : OCP, OVP, UVP, SCP, OTP, and OPP
•    MSRP for the Astro GD-1200W PSU: $239.99 USD

Please continue reading our review of the Astro GD 1200W PSU!!!

Manufacturer: Fractal Design

Introduction: The Core Series Shrinks Down


Image credit: Fractal Design

The Core 1100 from Fractal Design is a small micro-ATX case, essentially a miniature version of the previously reviewed Core 3300. With its small dimensions the Core 1100 targets micro-ATX and mini-ITX builders, and provides another option not only in Fractal Design's budget lineup, but in the crowded budget enclosure market.


The price level for the Core 1100 has fluctuated a bit on Amazon since I began this review, with prices ranging from a high of $50 down to a low of just $39. It is currently $39.99 at Newegg, so the price should soon stabilize at Amazon and other retailers. At the ~$40 level this could easily be a compelling option for a smaller build, though admittedly the design of these Core series cases is purely functional. Ultimately any enclosure recommendation will depend on ease of use and thermal performance/noise, which is exactly what we will look at in this review.

Continue reading our review of the Fractal Design Core 1100 case!!

She's a big one, check out the Corsair Graphite 780T

Subject: Cases and Cooling | November 7, 2014 - 01:50 PM |
Tagged: corsair, Graphite 780T

The Graphite 780T stands 689 x 332 x 670 mm (27 x 13 x 26") which gives you a lot of space to install your system.  The cooling options are similarly impressive, you can install up to six 140mm fans or nine 120mm or for watercoolers you can install up to a 360mm rad on the top or front, 240mm on the bottom or a 140mm rad on the back.  In addition to the drive cages with tool-less installation on the front of the case, you can also install three 2.5" drives on the back side of the case.  If you want to build a system with an XL-ATX motherboard, the biggest CPU cooler you can get your hands on an several of the largest GPUs on the market this case will take them all and still leave you with plenty of space.  Check out the full review at Overclockers Club.


"To follow up, the Graphite 780T has many positive things making it well worth the asking price. I don't have time to write out each in detail or this would go on forever, so I'm just going to cover the things that make it stand out. First up, having support for every aftermarket CPU cooler is a major advantage. When I say every single one, it's because nothing has topped 200mm yet and that would just be purely insane."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:


Thermaltake Launches Liquid Cooling Friendly Core V41 Case

Subject: Cases and Cooling | November 7, 2014 - 12:45 AM |
Tagged: water cooling, thermaltake, mid-tower, liquid cooling, core v41, atx

Thermaltake added a new mid-tower case to its Core series this week that is well-suited to water cooling systems. The new Core V41 is the smallest chassis in the family which includes the full tower Core V71 and the Core V51 mid-tower. Thermaltake's new case is a slightly more compact version of the Core V51 that maintains the curved metal mesh design. The Core V51 supports full ATX motherboards, multiple graphics cards, tool-free storage, and a large acrylic window.

Thermaltake Core V41 LCS MidTower.jpg

The Core V41 has a full mesh front panel with two externally-accessible 5.25" drive bays, two audio ports, and two USB 3.0 ports. The case has eight PCI expansion slots on the rear. It supports up to ATX motherboards, 170mm processor heatsinks, 275mm long graphics cards, and 180mm power supplies. Thermaltake includes a massive CPU cutout that should accommodate installation of just about any CPU backplate without needing to remove the motherboard. There are four large cable routing cutouts (sans grommets) around the motherboard tray as well as three water cooling grommets to allow external radiators and up to 1/2" diameter tubing.

Thermaltake Core V41 LCS Mid-Tower Case.jpg

Storage consists of two 5.25" drive bays, six 3.5" bays, and two stealth 2.5"/3.5" bays behind the motherboard tray. In a neat twist, all three tool-free bays are removable to allow for longer graphics cards and top-mounted liquid cooling radiators.

Thermaltake Core V41 LCS Mid-Tower Case Angled.jpg

The case supports a wide range of cooling configurations with vents along the top, front, rear, and bottom of the case (the Core V41 has rather tall feet which should make a bottom-mounted fan actually useful). Thermaltake includes magnetic dust filters on the top and front of the case, and it has been designed with front-to-back intake/exhaust airflow in mind. Thermaltake bundles the case with a single 120mm front intake and one 120mm rear exhaust.

Thermaltake Core V41 LCS Mid-Tower Case_LED.jpg

For air cooling, users can add two 120mm fans to the bottom and two 200mm fans to the top of the case. Alternatively, water cooling radiators can be set up as follows:

  • 1 x 360mm radiator in the front
  • 1 x 360mm radiator up top
  • 1 x 120mm radiator (common for sealed loop CPU coolers) in place of the rear exhaust fan.

There are some minor compromises, but overall the Core V41 looks to be a decent case with some useful features for its price range. Thermaltake has not yet revealed pricing or availability, but it should hit below the $100 mark at retail. For reference, the Core V51 retails for just under $110 USD and you are getting slightly less case with the V41.

Also read: 

Source: Thermaltake

Introduction: The HTPC Slims Down


There are many reasons to consider a home theater PC (HTPC) these days, and aside from the full functionality of a personal computer an HTPC can provide unlimited access to digital content from various sources. “Cord-cutting”, the term adopted for cancelling one’s cable or satellite TV service in favor of streaming content online, is gaining steam. Of course there are great self-contained solutions for streaming like the Roku and Apple TV, and one doesn't have to be a cord-cutter to use an HTPC for TV content, as CableCard users will probably tell you. But for those of us who want more control over our entertainment experience the limitless options provided by a custom build makes HTPC compelling. Small form-factor (SFF) computing is easier than ever with the maturation of the Mini-ITX form factor and decreasing component costs.

The Case for HTPC

For many prospective HTPC builders the case is a major consideration rather than an afterthought (it certainly is for me, anyway). This computer build is not only going into the most visible room in many homes, but the level of noise generated by the system is of concern as well. Clearly, searching for the perfect enclosure for the living room can be a major undertaking depending on your needs and personal style. And as SFF computing has gained popularity in the marketplace there are a growing number of enclosures being introduced by various manufacturers, which can only help in the search for the perfect case.

A manufacturer new on the HTPC enclosure scene is a company called Perfect Home Theater, a distributor of high-end home theater components. The enclosures from P.H.T. are slick looking aluminum designs supporting the gamut of form-factors from ATX all the way down to thin mini-ITX. The owner of Perfect Home Theater, Zygmunt Wojewoda, is also the designer of the ultra low-profile enclosure we’re looking at today, the T-ITX-6.

DSC_0770 (Large).JPG


As you can see it is a wide enclosure, built to match the width of standard components. And it’s really thin. Only 40mm tall, or 48mm total including the feet. Naturally this introduces more tradeoffs for the end user, as the build is strictly limited to thin mini-ITX motherboards. Though the enclosure is wide enough to theoretically house an ATX motherboard, the extremely low height would prevent it.

Continue reading our review of the P.H.T. Ultra Slim Aluminum HTPC enclosure!!

Fractal Design's Integra M series, coming soon

Subject: Cases and Cooling | November 4, 2014 - 03:27 PM |
Tagged: PSU, modular psu, fractal design, Integra M, 650W

Fractal Design is releasing a new series of PSUs, the Integra M series, to compliment the already available Integra R2 series.  They have kept to the slightly smaller sizing of 150mm x 86 mm x 140 mm with a 120mm fan that Kitguru found to operate quietly, only hitting 37.2dBA at full load with temperatures not exceeding 60C.  The efficiency ranged between 81-85% and ripple stayed within specification, it was perhaps not as solid as some units but decent for the price point of this PSU.  With 648W at 54A it is capable of handling multiple mid-range GPUs and has the PCIe plugs to handle the cards, though the cabling choice is a little odd.  Two of the 6+2 PCIe connectors are modular but there are two more connectors which are hard wired into the PSU along with the ATX power.  For those hoping to build a system on a budget with an eye for possible upgrades you should read the full Kitguru review and keep your eye out for the release of the Integra M series.


"Today we take a look at the latest power supply from Fractal Design, the Integra M 650W – released to target the budget enthusiast audience. This semi modular design has achieved 80 Plus Bronze Certification and will hit retail for around £55 inc vat. Is it worth shortlisting if you are working with a restrictive budget?"

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:


Source: KitGuru

Deep Cool's first watercooler, the Gamer Storm Maelstrom 240

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 31, 2014 - 01:35 PM |
Tagged: Deepcool, Gamer Storm Maelstrom 240, LCS, water cooling

The Gamer Storm Maelstrom 240 has a unique look with its LED and bright red fans but also hides a pump with a closed impeller which is intended to increase the performance at the same time as it reduces vibrations.  As the name implies the radiator roughly 240mm in size, 274 x 120 x 27mm to be exact with 0.2mm high-density water micro channels.  HiTech Legion tested it against a variety of coolers and found the performance to be similar to the competitions, though unfortunately at a much higher price point.  However it was almost silent in operation and the fans could be run on low speed without effecting the performance so for those who have a strong desire for a silent system might be willing to pay the $106 MSRP.


"Deep Cool has done this with their first liquid CPU cooler, the Gamer Storm Maelstrom 240 AIO Liquid Cooling. Do we see the force of a Maelstrom being represented? You be the judge. They use a unique pump with closed impeller to offer more power, less vibration, and lower noise as a result."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:


Cooler Master Announces Nepton 120XL and Nepton 240M All-In-One Liquid CPU Coolers

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 21, 2014 - 04:15 PM |
Tagged: Nepton 240M, Nepton 120XL, Nepton, cooler master, all in one

They are not quite available yet but Cooler Master have announced two new all in one watercoolers, the Nepton 120XL and 240M which incorporate a new Silencio fan which as you may expect offers good performance with low noise.  If the pricing follows the previous generation of Nepton you can expect to see the 120mm model retail for around $100 and the 240mm for around $120. 

Taipei, Taiwan — Oct 21st 2014 — Cooler Master, a leading creator, innovator, and manufacturer of desktop components and peripherals as well as mobile accessories today announced the Nepton 120XL and 240M, the latest additions to the Nepton all-in-one liquid cooling family. See full details on the Nepton 240M product page here.


Keeping It Cool
Nepton 120XL and 240M are introducing a brand new Silencio fan from Cooler Master. This fan is designed with unique fan blades and technology in order to maximize air flow and static pressure with minimal noise output. The result of these fans and Nepton’s skived fin micro-channel technology brings Nepton 120XL and 240M to a whole new level of cool, mirroring the thermal success of the Nepton 140XL and 280L models.


Maximum Compatibility
The Cooler Master Nepton series was introduced with the 140XL and 280L models, which sported 140mm and 280mm radiators respectively. The new Nepton 120XL is equipped with a 120mm radiator while the Nepton 240M is equipped with a 240mm radiator. These sizes allow more opportunity for builders and enthusiasts to get their hands on the incredible performance from the Nepton line.


Sealing the Deal
Using Cooler Master’s exclusive design, the pump of the Nepton series pushed 120 Liters of liquid per hour through the flexible and robust FEP tubing to maximize thermal transfer. Topping the pump with a simple geometric design and illuminated Cooler Master logo, the Nepton series continues to turn heads. Backed by a 5-year warranty, Nepton 120XL and 240M will be cooling systems for years to come.

Nepton 120XL and 240M is now shipping to vendors in North America and will be available soon. Price and availability may vary based on region.

Corsair's HX1000i is good, but not quite great

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 21, 2014 - 02:26 PM |
Tagged: modular psu, HX1000i, Corsair Link, corsair, 80 Plus Platinum

Corsair have updated their high end and high powered PSU line with the HX1000i, developed once again with CWT and sporting an 80 PLUS Platinum rating and Corsair Link integration.  The documentation is a little confusing, referring to a single 12v rail rated at 83.3A or 1000W but also mentioning it can be toggled to multiple 12V rails, not to mention the small rounding error in their math.  The actual PSU is very well constructed and passed all of the tests that [H]ard|OCP's torture chamber required of it; just not to the same level that the older HX1000 unit managed.  That is a little disappointing as you would hope that the quality would improve over time but it is in line with the competition and certainly not a bad showing, merely not what [H] had hoped for.   It is still worth your consideration so make sure to read through the whole review to see if the HX1000i meets your needs.


"Corsair's HX series represents its "second tier" line of enthusiast computer power supplies, but its new HX1000i does take the top spot when it comes to its ~1000 watt power supplies that are Platinum certified and fully modular. Let's see if this latest addition from Corsair represents its quality pedigree of days gone by. "

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Source: [H]ard|OCP

FanlessTech Shows Gigantic, Unreleased Heatsinks

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 19, 2014 - 04:52 PM |

There are many interesting ways to pull heat away from a processor. You can submerge your device in mineral oil or even phase-change fluid (such as "Novec"). You can push cool fluid up to the thing that you are trying to remove heat from and then pump it away through a radiator. If using air, you can make use of vapor chambers and the convection current formed as devices heat up. The goal is to abuse one or more interesting material properties to store energy and move it somewhere else.


Image Credit:

Or you can just have an obscene, gigantic mass of metal with more fins than the NHL. According to FanlessTech, these are three heatsinks that are not yet available (and may never be). Two of them have three towers, connected to the base by heat pipes, and the last one has four.


Image Credit:

Personally, I would be a bit uncomfortable about buying a PC like that unless I needed absolutely silent or top air cooling performance. The amount that it hangs over RAM or nuzzles against add-in boards seems sketchy to me, especially if you need to swap a DIMM or two at some point, but I always use stock coolers at reference voltage and frequency so what do I know?


Image Credit:

Yes, that would be a regular, ATX motherboard.

When will these prototypes become available? Who knows if they even will. Still, if you have a need for cooling solutions that are a little over-the-top, you might be able to get your hands on these some day. There's nothing wrong with adding more mass and surface area, rather than doing something fancy. It works, and it probably works really well.

Source: FanlessTech