Corsair Announces Nearly-Silent RM Series Power Supplies

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 14, 2013 - 02:53 PM |
Tagged: rm series, PSU, Corsiar, 80 Plus Gold

Corsair has introduced its new RM series of power supplies. The new lineup replaces the TX series and sits between the existing HX and AXi series. RM-series PSUs are optimized for efficient and nearly silent operation.

Corsair RM1000.png

The new fully modular RM series power supplies are 80 PLUS Gold certified and range from 450W to 1000W. The PSUs reportedly use low noise capacitors and transistors along with a 135mm fan that only starts spinning under high load (what Corsair calls the “ZeroRPM Fan Mode”) such as gaming. In addition to quiet operation, the RM series supports monitoring functionality. Using Corsair Link software, users can monitor PSU fan speed and power delivery. A cable, called the Corsair Digital Bridge Cable, runs from the PSU to either the system motherboard or a Corsair Link Hub and enables the monitoring features. This cable comes bundled with the highest-end RM1000 (1000W) unit, but is an additional charge for the other RM series.

Corsair RM1000 Cables.png

The fully modular RM1000 and its bundled cables.

The lineup includes the RM450, RM550, RM650, RM750, RM850, and RM1000 in 450W to 1KW maximum loads respectively. These new PSUs will be available at the end of October for the following prices:

RM Series Power Supply SKU Price (MSRP)
RM450 $99.99
RM550 $109.99
RM650 $119.99
RM750 $129.99
RM850 $159.99
RM1000 $199.99
Source: Corsair

EVGA Launches Mini ITX Hadron Air Case

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 13, 2013 - 01:44 PM |
Tagged: mini ITX, hadron air, hadron, evga

EVGA has launched a new barebones Mini ITX case called the Hadron Air. The new case is in the same vein as the MiniBox chassis it showed off at Computex earlier this year. The new Hadron Air measures 12" x 6.6" x 12.1" (HxWxD) and is constructed of aluminum with a black brushed finish on the outside.

EVGA Hadron Mini ITX Case_angled.jpg

The Hadron Air has curved edges and rounded corners. The front of the case is lifted up slightly by case feet, putting the case at a slight angle. There are vents on the top and right side of the case as well as an acrylic window on the left side panel. A bay for a slim slot loading optical drive and the front IO port are located on the right side of the case. The front IO includes two USB 3.0 ports and two HD audio jacks. The back of the case has a bottom mounted power supply, two PCI slots, and two water cooling passthrough grommets.

EVGA Hadron Mini ITX Case.jpg

EVGA is bundling the case with a small form factor 500W power supply. The PSU is 80 PLUS Gold rated and offers up 40A on the 12V rail. The case supports Mini ITX motherboards, two 2.5" or 3.5" storage drives, and dual slot graphics cards up to 267mm in length. As far as cooling, the case supports two 120mm exhaust fans in the top panel and the power supply has its own small intake fan. A list of compatible CPU coolers can be found here.

EVGA Hadron Mini ITX Case_bundled components.jpg

The case comes bundled with a 500W power supply, manual, AC power cord, two SATA cables, and a bracket for a slim slot loading optical drive.

The Hadron Air is available now for $189.99. The Mini ITX chassis is part of the Hadron series of cases which includes the Air and a water cooling optimized version called the Hadron Hydro which is reportedly "coming soon."

More information on the Hadron Air can be found on this EVGA product page.

Source: EVGA
Manufacturer: Corsair

Introduction and Features

Corsair’s Carbide Series currently includes eight models in different sizes, shapes, and colors (mostly black but the 500R is available in white) which includes the 200R, 300R, 330R, 400R, 500R, and the Air-540 High Airflow Cube case.

2-Banner.jpg

In this review we are going to take a detailed look at Corsair’s Carbide Series 330R quiet mid-tower case. The 330R incorporates superior sound absorption material for quiet operation, numerous cooling options, and support for multiple, extended length VGA cards.  The 330R enclosure features a full length, hinged front door and comes with one 140mm intake fan in the front and one 120mm exhaust fan on the back with five optional fan mounting locations along with support for liquid cooling radiators.

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(Courtesy of Corsair)

Here is what Corsair has to say about their Carbide Series enclosures: “Corsair Carbide Series® mid-tower PC cases have the high-end features you need, and nothing you don’t. Designed to be the foundation of awesome yet approachable gaming PCs, they combine the latest technology and ergonomic innovations with lots of room to build and expand, and amazing cooling potential!

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(Courtesy of Corsair)

Carbide 330R Quiet Mid-Tower Case Key Features:
• Supports E-ATX, ATX, Micro ATX and Mini ATX motherboards
• Extensive noise dampening material on the front door, side panels, and top panel to quiet noisy internal components
• Hinged front door is reversible, with angled air intakes to reflect internal noise away from the user
• Direct airflow to components – the front 140mm fan is unrestricted by hard drive cages and protected by a low-restriction dust filter
• Removable top panel, with top fan mounts pre-drilled for 240mm or 280mm fans and/or liquid cooling radiators
• Excellent cooling and low noise levels with up to five separate fan mounting locations
  o   Front: 140mm fan included (upgradable to dual 120mm or 140mm)
  o   Top: Dual 120mm or 140mm
  o   Rear: 120mm fan included
• USB 3.0 on front panel with internal motherboard connectors
• Four 3.5” / 2.5” hard drive bays with full SSD compatibility
• Three 5.25” front exposed drive bays
• Tool-free installation of 5.25” and 3.5” drives
• Up to 450mm (17.6”) of space for long graphics cards
• Up to 160mm (6.3”) of space for CPU coolers
• Cable routing cutouts to keep cables out of the airflow path

Please continue reading the Corsair 330R Quiet case review!!!

In Win Unveils Full Tower Tou Chassis

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 6, 2013 - 01:12 AM |
Tagged: in win, tou, full tower, atx, tempered glass

In Win, a manufacturer of cases, power supplies, and storage drives showed off a prototype full tower ATX case at Computex 2013 that is now officially launching as a production model in limited quantities. The case, called the Tou, is constructed of a sand case aluminum frame and surrounded by tempered glass with a mirror finish.

Feature02.jpg

The glass is such that when the internal case LEDs are off, the various case panels act as mirrors. However, when the internal blue LEDs are turned on, light passes through the glass and users can see the PC internals through the glass panels.

Feature08.jpg

The full tower chassis is roughly rectangular with angular edges, a large mesh vent on the top panel, bottom mounted 5.25” drive bay, and two handles attached to the front panel. The front panel has two skinny vents on either side to allow the front 120mm intake fan to pull in cool air. The top panel supports 360mm water cooling radiators or three 120mm fans. Front IO includes two USB 3.0 ports and two audio ports.

Feature07.jpg

Internally, the In Win Tou case supports ATX motherboards, ATX power supplies, three 3.5” hard drives, two 2.5” SSDs, and GPUs up to 380mm in length.

Feature03.jpg

According to Hexus.net, the limited edition Tou case will be available soon for around $800. IT is an interesting design, and the mirrored panels are unique. I don't care for the particular angular edges and bolt pattern on the side panel, and the internal features are at a bare minimum, which is less than I would have expected from an $800 case. I'm interested to see what case modders are able to do with it though, and how enthusiasts take advantage of the mirrored glass to show off their systems.

Source: In Win

Quoth the Raven, "SilverStone"

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 4, 2013 - 06:46 PM |
Tagged: Silverstone, Raven RV04

When the front of your case has a pair of 180mm fans in it you know it is big, 219x581x497mm (8.6x22.8x19.5") or as they describe it on the spec sheet, 63.2 litres, which is a lot of mineral oil.  This does mean you have space for oversized coolers and massive GPUs as well as over a dozen drives of varying sizes as well as radiators for watercooling.  [H]ard|OCP were not impressed with the door on this case but were quite impressed at the capabilities of what seemed at first glance to be mediocre fan filters.  See what you think of the overall design as well as the functionality in their full review.

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"The SilverStone Raven series of computer cases have been favorites around the HardOCP offices for years. This new Raven RV04 has a somewhat different spin, literally. Long gone is the 90 degree rotation on the mainboard which brings the Raven back into the realm of "normal" cases. SilverStone is preaching an even better thermal profile."

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Source: [H]ard|OCP

Digital Storm Releases HydroLux Liquid Cooling System

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 2, 2013 - 11:31 PM |
Tagged: Digital Storm, hydrolux, aventum II, water cooling

Last week, boutique OEM Digital Storm unleashed the HydroLux cooling system for its high end desktops. The HydroLux system is a high end, custom water cooling system for all of the major system components paired with custom software that allows users to monitor and manage the cooling system.

Digital Storm Hydrolux Cooling.jpg

The Hydrolux loop is essentially a highly customized water loop with some interesting extra features. The water loop is designed to cool the CPU, VRMs, and GPUs with water. The various water blocks have chrome fittings and are connected using red tubing. A large cylindrical reservoir, high flow pump, and two 360mm radiators make up the rest of the water loop. The two radiators each have three LED-lit 120mm fans. Other features include quick disconnects to facilitate easy component upgrades and a high flow pumps rated at 300 gallons per hour.

digital-storm-hydrolux.jpg

Using the HydroLux software, users can monitor the temperatures of the components (CPU, GPU, HDD, ect) and the water temperature itself. The LEDS used in the chassis and on the fans can be set to certain user-selected colors or to automatic mode which will gradually change the color from blue to red as the system temperature increases from higher system load be it gaming, rendering, or other intensive activities.

Digital Storm HydroLux Cooling Software.jpg

Enthusiasts are also able to choose from three pre-set modes that will control the fan speeds to get the best balance of noise and cooling performance.

The HydroLux cooling system will be available on all of Digital Storm's desktops, including the new Aventum II. In short, while it is essentially just a custom water loop, the company has added some nice features to make it interesting and if you are going the OEM/boutique route it looks to be one of the better pre-built custom water options.

CODE Keyboard Is Probably Pretty Good

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 2, 2013 - 02:12 AM |
Tagged: WASD Keyboards, mechanical keyboard, keyboard, CODE

... But if you read the blog post, you would think it is the one keyboard to rule them all.

The CODE is the product, literally, of a collaboration between Stack Overflow co-founder Jeff Atwood and Weyman Kwong of WASD Keyboards. I recognize the tongue-in-cheek humor and I acknowledge that the team are clearly (that was not a Cherry MX switch pun... that I would admit to) well suited to the challenge of designing a keyboard for programmers.

code-trio.jpg

Before we run through the opinion, its key touted perks are:

  • Cherry MX Clear switches
    • Similar to Cherry MX Brown with much more resistance. Hard to bottom out.
  • DIP switches to customize functionality without software.
  • White LED backlighting
  • Very stable rubberized ergonomic flaps and angled pads.
  • Detachable Micro USB cable

The thing is, WASD Keyboards already allows users to purchase customized keyboards. As far as I can tell, the CODE is just a variant of the existing WASD V2 104-key Custom Mechanical Keyboard with white backlighting. Both Keyboards are priced at $149.99. The CODE limits your choice but provides you with the illuminated keys and the MX Clear switches, normally a $10 upgrade, in exchange for just taking what you are offered without question. Okay, you can ask for a 104-Key or an 87-Key version, so one question is allowed. Still, the CODE is a good value; as I mentioned, you basically get free key lighting and a free upgrade to Cherry MX Clear.

code-v2-87-dip2.jpg

But it is still not an epiphany for mechanical keyboard lovers.

At one point, I hoped to take some time for a hobby and modify a mechanical keyboard to fit my specifications. I envisioned an aluminum body enclosing solidly built buckle-spring keys. I did not know about Cherry MX Green switches at the time. For keycaps, I imagined two pieces of glass sandwiching a translucent white plastic sheet masked with a black symbol for each letter. I figure the feel of glass would be more pleasing to the fingers than warm plastic. Each key would, of course, be let from underneath with a soft white (blue-doped-white) LED. Each translucent sheet would softly diffuse the light except for the shadow of whatever characters the key represents.

That would be a revolution... for me. I think I would like the feel of cool glass under my fingers.

So I guess I leave the post with a question for the viewers: What would your "perfect" keyboard be?

Source: CODE

Cooler Master Elite 130 Is A Mini ITX Case With Full Mesh Front Panel

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 29, 2013 - 09:21 PM |
Tagged: mini ITX, htpc, elite 130, cooler master

Cooler Master recently released the Elite 130 Mini ITX case, which is an update to the existing Elite 120. The Elite 130 measures 9.4” x 8.1” x 14.9” (240mm x 205mm x 377.5mm) and will be available for under $50.

Cooler Master Elite 130 Angled.jpg

The Elite 130 weighs 6.8 pounds and is constructed of a steel alloy body with a polymer mesh front panel. The all black chassis has a mesh front panel with IO on the left and a single 5.25” drive bay. There is an 80mm vent on the right panel and a vent (without a fan) on the left side panel. The rear of the case features two PCI slots and a single rubber grommet for water cooling or USB 3.0 pass through cables. The case supports standard ATX power supplies through the use of an extension bracket. The PSU sticks out slightly from the back of the case and a vent on the case’s top panel allows for the power supply to pull in cool air from the outside rather than from the case internals.

Cooler Master Elite 130 Mini ITX Case Rear IO.jpg

Front IO on the Cooler Master Elite 130 includes two USB 3.0 ports and two audio jacks.

Internally, the Elite 130 supports a single 5.25” drive, two 3.5” hard drives, and a single solid state drive mounted in a side bracket. Alternatively, users can forgo an optical drive in favor of having three total 3.5” drives or four total 2.5” drives.

Cooler Master Elite 130 Cooling.jpg

The case comes pre-installed with a 120mm intake fan and users can add a single 80x15mm fan on the right side panel. Users can swap out the front intake fan for water cooling radiator.

The Elite 130 supports Mini ITX motherboards, graphics cards up to 13.5,” CPU coolers up to 2.5” tall, and power supplies up to 180mm long.

According to Maximum PC, the Cooler Master Elite 130 is available from Amazon for $43.26. The Mini ITX case comes with a two year warranty.

Lian Li Shows Off Massive PC-A79 Full Tower

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 28, 2013 - 04:18 PM |
Tagged: Lian Li, Lian Li PC-A79, full tower, e-atx, XL-ATX, hptx, aluminum

Lian Li recently showed off a new full tower case -- clad in the company’s traditional brushed aluminum -- called the PC-A79. The PC-A79 measures 24.3” x 9” x 23.4” and offers up ample space for high end PC components.

Lian Li PC-A79 Full Tower Workstation Case.jpg

On the outside, the Lian Li PC-A79 is covered in dark brushed aluminum. It has two front case feet and two rear wheels to make transporting the system easier. The front of the case hosts 12 individually filtered mesh 5.25” bay covers. There are also two LEDs for power and HDD activity in the top right corner of the front panel. The bezel surrounding the bay covers can be removed with needing tools to allow for easy removal of the bay covers and hard drives (depending on which way you install the hard drive cages). The left side panel comes with two pre-installed 120mm fans. Interestingly, Lian Li has designed a connector and routed the fan wires such that the side panel can be removed without needing to worry about disconnecting the fans. Additionally, the top of the case has a filtered vent that can hold up to two 140mm fans (or a 280mm radiator). The fans get screwed into a bracket which in turn is screwed into the top panel, making installation a bit easier.

Front IO on the PC-A79 is hidden under a cover on the front edge of the top panel. IO options include two audio jacks, four USB 3.0 ports, and a single eSATA port.

Rear IO includes six water cooling grommets, a single 120mm exhaust fan, a bottom-mounted PSU, and 11 PCI slots. There is a filter for the bottom mounted power supply that can be removed from the side of the case which is a nice option to have.

Internally, the full tower supports motherboards up to HTPX, E-ATX and XL-ATX in size, graphics cards up to 350mm (13.78”) in length, and CPU coolers up to 165mm (5.7”) tall. The PC-A79 comes with three hard drive cages, each of which can hold three 3.5” hard drives and two 2.5” solid state drives. In addition to the drive cages, users can mount two 2.5” drives on the bottom of the case for a total of nine 3.5” drives and eight SSDs. The drives mount into the cages using brushed aluminum brackets that double as handles. The drives slide into the cages and are locked in place by a thumbscrew latch. The case features a removable motherboard tray with a large CPU cutout and eight rubber grommets that allow for routing cables behind the motherboard tray.

Lian Li PC-A79 Full Tower Workstation Case Internals.jpg

The case supports up to seven total fans (not counting the PSU fan), including:

  • 2 x 120mm side panel fans
  • 3 x 120mm front panel fans (mounted on hard drive cages)
  • 2 x 120 or 140mm fans on top panel

The massive full tower case will be available in September with an MSRP of $389. While PC gamers may opt for more sylish cases, the Lian Li PC-A79 would be a good fit for workstation builds.

Source: Lian Li

Seasonic seems to be competing against its self with the X-Series

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 27, 2013 - 03:56 PM |
Tagged: X-650, Seasonic X-Series, PSU, modular psu

Seasonic's X-650 PSU is fully modular, allowing you to choose exactly what cables you use though the ATX power is mandatory.  It has four 6+2 PCIe power connectors and can deliver 648W @ 54A to the 12V rail making this a solid choice for a multi-GPU system.  The performance on [H]ard|OCP's test bench was excellent, the only complaint they've had is that Seasonic really hasn't changed much about their PSUs in quite a while.  That might be a little boring for reviewers but for enthusiasts, great performance at a variety of wattage is a good thing.

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"Seasonic's X-Series computer power supply comes to us boasting a patented fully modular design that minimizes voltage drops and impedance while greatly maximizing efficiency, cooling, and overall performance. Being a Seasonic unit, we can also count on it targeting the users looking for a quiet computing experience."

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Source: [H]ard|OCP