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Intel SSD 335 Series 240GB Full Review - Intel's first 20nm SSD

Subject: Storage
Tagged: 335, Intel, ssd

IOMeter - Average Transaction Time (rev 1)

Back with the Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB review, I revised the layout of these graphs to better show SSD latency and access time.  First, I have removed HDD results as they throw the scale too far to tell any meaningful difference in the SSD's you are trying to focus on.  Second, I have reduced the queue depth scale down to 4.  In practical terms of a running OS, queue depth is how many commands are 'stacked up' on the SSD at that time.  An SSD is so fast at servicing requests that typical use will rarely see it increasing past 4.  In the cases where it does, there is so much going on that you are more concerned with IOPS and throughput at that point than transaction time.  The below charts are meant to show how nimble a given SSD is.  Think of it as how well a car handles as opposed to how fast it can go.

Some notes for interpreting results:

  • Times measured at QD=1 can serve as a more 'real' value of seek time.
  • A 'flatter' line means that drive will scale better and ramp up its IOPS when hit with multiple requests simultaneously.

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These tests focus on QD 1-4. SandForce units show higher than average latencies in these tests.

October 29, 2012 | 05:06 PM - Posted by Superj (not verified)

Looks like an Intel /Samsung battle...
Do any of the new wave consumer oriented drives have any power failure protection like super caps to commit writes on power loss?

October 31, 2012 | 08:07 PM - Posted by Allyn Malventano

Intel is putting the solid state caps in their enterprise products, not their consumer products.

October 30, 2012 | 01:33 PM - Posted by Emilio (not verified)

Great, thanks Allyn I am really interested in having 2 of these raid0 on a gamming pc. I wonder, is there a place where i can find the yapt benchmark, i am interested in running all this benchmarks on my box, see how it compares with the results here. Also the pc per file test is propierary? do you sell that one?

October 31, 2012 | 08:11 PM - Posted by Allyn Malventano

YAPT is one of our toys, but PCPer file copy can easily be replicated with a batch file copy.

October 30, 2012 | 03:21 PM - Posted by undermined

From what I've seen is that the Corsair Neutron GTX is the main drive to beat in RAID-0 paired with a z77 board and 11.6 drivers option rom so it can handle TRIM.

Now that Hynix bought Link-a-Media and Samsung is making their own drives too, I'd like Intel or Micron making the chipset and flash rather than Sandforce or Marvel so that firmware and reliability going forward stays at the top.

Personally I grabbed a 256GB Samsung 830 on sale because of how it handles GC versus the Intel drives and was cheaper and something about sandforce compressing the data and swapping from performance to reliability modes once they get kind of full didn't sit right with me.

Now we just need pci-e based solutions to become viable boot drives for cheap so raid controllers and SATA stop being a bottle neck .

November 1, 2012 | 10:53 AM - Posted by PowerHungry (not verified)

Tell us where we can get this at your review price seen here: 240G @ $184 ($0.76 / GB)

November 1, 2012 | 01:15 PM - Posted by Jeremy Hellstrom

That's the problem with MSRP, it is only a suggestion.  It is just over $300 on NewEgg and you probably won't see sales in the very near future but sooner or later I am sure there will be discounts.

November 1, 2012 | 06:45 PM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

Must've been a mistake or something, I see it on Newegg for $209 at the moment...

November 2, 2012 | 11:04 AM - Posted by Jeremy Hellstrom

Ya, that should've been a 2 not a 3.

November 6, 2012 | 07:03 PM - Posted by mtrush (not verified)

i still don't see that 2012 update for decoder ring 0_o

April 11, 2013 | 01:44 PM - Posted by Dave (not verified)

will series 335 run on sata rev 1 mobo.

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