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An Inside Look at Intel and Micron 25nm Flash Memory Production

Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: Intel
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Videos

To accompany the stock photos they provided, I took the liberty of digging up some youtube vids that give a bit more motion to the static shots. The first video is the IMFT recruiting video.  You'll see a fair chunk of the factory in action if you can look past the 'come work for us' bits.  I've noted a few key time stamps from the video below.

0:05 - FOUP's full of 25 wafers a piece being moved around the plant by the AMHS bots.
0:10 - They had a camera riding on one of the AMHS bots for this brief shot.
0:11 - Photoresist being applied to a spinning wafer, helping spread it rapidly and evenly.
0:16 - A brief shot of one of the lithography rooms.
0:44 - Wafer being extracted from a FOUP (taken from *within* the tool).
0:45 - 0:54 - Wafers being moved within one of the many tools.
2:17 - 2:27 - A quick animated description of how flash is made.
2:33 - 2:36 - This is how most of the fab floor looks.  Workers at floor level and AMHS bots buzzing about overhead.
4:08 - 4:35 - AMHS in action.  If R2D2 ever becomes a reality, he would have evolved from these guys.
5:28 - 5:40 - Reloading one of the tools with the chemicals necessary for their job.

I also came across a piece where the KSL news crew was allowed to video a good portion of the plant.  This tour mirrors our experience, and contains some additional details as described by Dave Baglee:

Finally, I found a pretty cool video that shows an overview of the chip making process from start to finish.  This is specific to CPU's but the process for flash is very much the same.  The only difference being several dies would be stacked and packaged into a TSOP as opposed to the Flip Chip + IHS packaging of a typical CPU.

More details from the above video can be found here.

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