Review Index:
Feedback

Intel Core i7-3770K Ivy Bridge LGA1155 Processor Review

Author: Ryan Shrout
Subject: Processors
Manufacturer: Intel

Overclocking

MSI OC Genie Overclocking

For my initial overclocking testing with the new Ivy Bridge processor, I decided to try out two methods.  First, the basic, dead simple OC Genie II button on our MSI Z77A-GD65 motherboard is about as painless as overclocking gets.  Just push the button, turn on the system and boom, you are overclocked.

View Full Size

Our 3.50 GHz processor booted into windows running at just about 4.2 GHz - and that is without the use of Turbo Boost at all.  We were hitting 4.2 GHz whether we were utilizing a single core or all four of them. 

View Full Size

With this frequency increase we saw a CB11 score increase of nearly 12% (8.35 pts versus 7.51 pts). 

View Full Size

On our TrueCrypt test we see a similar 10.8% performance boost!

View Full Size

We were still running under 1.2v on the i7-3770K but even so we were hitting load temperatures of nearly 70C with our H80 spun up.

Manual Overclocking

Manual overclocking was done the most basic way - increasing the multiplier on our unlocked K-SKU part and increasing the Vcore when necessary for stability.  My limit appeared to be 4.7 GHz at 1.3v with this CPU configuration.

View Full Size

To be fair, the 1.3v setting for this processor is on the upper limit of what you should be using according to many reports.  The 22nm process is great for low power consumption but apparently not great for overclocking - higher voltages result in much higher temperatures than what we would have seen on Sandy Bridge.

View Full Size

Running at 4.7 GHz we see a 25% performance boost in Cinebench 11...

View Full Size

...and a 24% boost in TrueCrypt.  Pretty impressive results actually. 

View Full Size

But things are getting HOT under our Corsair H80 as it was unable to keep the CPU from breaching the 80C mark.  

We'll be doing more overclocking testing in the days to come so stay tuned but this is definitely something to keep an eye on for those serious overclockers out there. 

Also, if you want to see JJ Guerrero from ASUS demonstrate overclocking on the ASUS line of Z77 motherboards, check out our video from our live review below!

April 26, 2012 | 11:29 PM - Posted by Jewie27 (not verified)

lol my Sandy Bridge system sits next to a Pentium 4 system. I actually own two Pentium 4 systems, freshly installed copies of Windows XP and all hardware upgraded.

April 29, 2012 | 01:41 PM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

Now that HD4000 has arrived, can OpenCL be used to enhance the performance of the Ivy Bridge processor while simultaneously using a discrete graphics processor? If OpenCL can utilize GPU cycles for general purpose compute tasks then It should be able to utilize the Intel integrated GPU for more general purpose processing power in addition to the Ivy bridge's other CPU cores, while the discrete GPU uses its resources for the graphics. OpenCL should see all the hardware on the computer as an available resource and It should be able to do this? If not then what is described as Heterogeneous computing has not completely arrived yet! Or is it just a matter of waiting for the software to catch up?

May 18, 2012 | 05:50 PM - Posted by Ben (not verified)

OpenCL does not apply to "general purpose" compute tasks. OpenCL applications are extremely parallel algorithms for specialized data sets, there's nothing general purpose about it.

The "general purpose" in GPGPU simply means "not limited to graphics rendering".

May 18, 2012 | 05:50 PM - Posted by Ben (not verified)

OpenCL does not apply to "general purpose" compute tasks. OpenCL applications are extremely parallel algorithms for specialized data sets, there's nothing general purpose about it.

The "general purpose" in GPGPU simply means "not limited to graphics rendering".

May 18, 2012 | 05:51 PM - Posted by Ben (not verified)

OpenCL does not apply to "general purpose" compute tasks. OpenCL applications are extremely parallel algorithms for specialized data sets, there's nothing general purpose about it.

The "general purpose" in GPGPU simply means "not limited to graphics rendering". It's not even close to the same type of "general purpose processing power" as what a CPU provides.

April 29, 2012 | 07:43 PM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

This is a true technical review of Ivy Bridge graphics! with some jucy details about Haswell!

http://www.realworldtech.com/page.cfm?ArticleID=RWT042212225031

May 7, 2012 | 02:03 PM - Posted by Anno2012 (not verified)

"And if you happen to be one of those poor fools still using a Pentium 4 processor - will you please save us all the early death of global warming and upgrade?"

Well, i still have one. I'm a PIV (with HT) big fan (smile*).

July 25, 2012 | 01:53 AM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

I recently got a i7 2600k PC with a GTX 680 graphics card. My motherboard is a Z77. Should I upgrade to the i7 3770k ? is the 10-15% worth the money ?

April 5, 2014 | 07:09 AM - Posted by Chrysanthi Lykousi (not verified)

I got a 3770 and I love it!

Post new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd> <blockquote><p><br>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.

More information about formatting options

By submitting this form, you accept the Mollom privacy policy.