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Frame Rating Dissected: Full Details on Capture-based Graphics Performance Testing

DiRT 3 – HD 7970 versus GTX 680

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Dirt 3 is a game that is already running at very high frame rates at 1920x1080 so it comes as no surprise that the scaling in CrossFire and SLI is minimal.  In terms of single GPU performance though the HD 7970 stays ahead of the GXT 680 consistently.

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This is an interesting plot; while the green and black lines both are pretty thin and tight indicating a solid gaming experience with little stutter or frame variance, both the blue and orange lines of the multi-GPU configs have higher than expected variance.  What might be more interesting is that this is the first time thus far that we haven’t found the HD 7970s in CrossFire to be completely abysmal. 

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Well look at that!  Both the observed and FRAPS FPS graphs are nearly the same, telling us that while AMD has some definite CrossFire scaling issues with Battlefield 3 and Crysis 3, DiRT 3 doesn’t appear to have suffering from the same ailment. 

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The minimum frame rate percentile graph shows us that the HD 7970 is indeed faster than the GTX 680 across the board, though both cards are overpowered for this game at 19x10.  CrossFire and SLI both stay in range of each other the entire time as well with SLI falling a bit behind after the 84th percentile.

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Our ISU graph here shows an interesting result and different view of performance than the minimum FPS percentile graph above it.  While the two cards were close in comparison before the HD 7970s in CrossFire actually look much better than SLI in this case, indicating a “tighter” band of frame times. 

 

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The results are starting out the same here at 2560x1440 though there is much more scaling occurring on both AMD and NVIDIA setups by adding a second card.

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Hmm, that’s interesting.  This was an occurrence we saw nearly every run of Dirt 3 with CrossFire at 25x14 so I wanted to be sure to include it here.  At the times between 25 and 30 seconds (it was different times in each run) we saw runts pop up again, almost as if the CrossFire cards were “getting out of phase” or something like that.  SLI has a few bigger spikes but nothing ever showed up that consistently. 

As a tip to one of my concluding thoughts of this article, I think that this result, and others we’ll show before the end, is indicative of the major problem for CrossFire.  It appears that when the GPU is the primary bottleneck, CrossFire just can’t keep up in some way and produces runts.  That would explain why would see it at 25x14 here but NOT at 19x12.  Just keep that in mind as you keep reading.

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As a result of that series of runts, the observed FPS of HD 7970s in CrossFire drops during that time.

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The minimum FPS percentiles graph shows the same result in a different way – it is obvious that the runts are causing the frame rates at the back 5% of this chart and the “build up” to and away from that subsection are what causes the decline around the 85% mark.

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The frame variance and potential stutter graph here shows the results of that spike of runts as well with a much higher overall variance than SLI or either single card.

 

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Dirt 3 was another game case where 5760x1080 results didn’t pan out for the HD 7970 in CrossFire so we are only seeing single GPUs and SLI results.  SLI is scaling very well but the single GTX 680 is getting bested by the HD 7970 the entire time.

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All of our results are pretty good here the GTX 680s in SLI produce a fairly tight frame time line and frame rates well above either single card.

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Without any runts or drops our observed frame rates are identical to our FRAPS frame rates.

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Tight plots of frame times indicate and nearly straight lines here match our real-world game play experiences of smooth frame rates.

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While this might look bad for the cards in question – check the scale on the left!  The most frame time variance we see on any option here is 1.6ms so we come away from our testing happy with 5760x1080 results for everything but the HD 7970s in CrossFire.

March 27, 2013 | 04:34 PM - Posted by Ryan Shrout

I'll see if we can take a look at that.

March 29, 2013 | 12:31 PM - Posted by jgstew

The whole time I was reading this article, I was more and more curious how Virtu's technology would effect things. I'm curious about more than just their Virtual V-sync, but their other options as well for both single and multiple GPUs. Virtu has not had the scaling that SLI & Crossfire have had, but perhaps their technology would show well in other areas with this analysis.

I do feel that Frame Rating & the input to display latency are much more interesting metrics.

Great work on the article.

March 27, 2013 | 02:32 PM - Posted by serpinati of the wussu (not verified)

I've read somewhere that this will not be the norm for pcper to do this type of testing with all video card reviews (too labor intensive). Is this true?

If it is true, will pcper at least record the frame data and simply give it a quick look to make sure video cards aren't doing something absolutely crazy (for example, if you were reviewing those 7970's crossfire you might not plan to actually to analyze the frame times, but you would at least look over the recorded frames anyways and catch the crazy runt frames and mention it in your reviews.)

March 27, 2013 | 04:34 PM - Posted by Ryan Shrout

No, my plan is to take this route going forward.

March 27, 2013 | 02:57 PM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

Greatly appreciate the work behind this! And opening up the tools / scripts to everyone, pushing it to other hardware magazines. Huge kudos! Oh, and you should slap Anandtech over the head for not even mentioning your involvment into the new metering method in their introductory article, that only mentions nVidia...

Is there any way to determine latency between t_present and t_display? If not, it should be - maybe some kind of timestamp could be worked into the overlay? Because that would be interesting not only in the context of VSync, but also regarding nVidias frame metering, which must take some time analyzing the frametimes. Supposedly, AMD has some smoothing algorithm coming up for Crossfire as well, so there it would also be valuable information.

Regarding Adaptive / Smooth VSync: They clearly come off too good in this article. They're not the focus of the article of course, still a little more thought should have been put behind this, considering the amount of time taken to create this awe inspiring effort of an article and the tools behind it. Adaptive VSync turns VSync off when tearing is most annoyingly visible, i.e. at framerates below monitor refresh rate - true triple buffering (instead of the queue nowadays called triple buffering) would be the good solution here. Smooth Vsync does not seem to do anything particularly positive judging from what little measurement is available in the article - only time (further tests that is) will tell what it actually does...

March 27, 2013 | 04:36 PM - Posted by Ryan Shrout

We have more research into the different NVIDIA Vsync options coming up, stay tuned.

As for the timestamp different to check for the gaps between t_present and t_display...we are on that same page as well.  :)

March 27, 2013 | 02:57 PM - Posted by Mawrtin (not verified)

Have you tried CF using radeonpro? Apparently it offers some kinda of Dynamic V-sync similar to nVidias adaptive if I'm not mistaken.

March 27, 2013 | 05:03 PM - Posted by Marty (not verified)

No, it does not. It's a frame limiter, which eliminates some of the stutter, but causes more lag (increases latency).

March 27, 2013 | 03:16 PM - Posted by Mangix

Hmmm. I wonder if there is a difference between Double and Triple Buffered VSync. Newer Valve games support both. Would appreciate testing there.

Also, are there driver settings that help/harm frame rating? Nvidia's Maximum Pre-rendered frames setting sounds like something that can have an effect.

March 27, 2013 | 04:25 PM - Posted by xbeaTX (not verified)

AMD has complained on Anandtech for this type of test using fraps ... now anyone know the real situation and it's shocking
this article sets the new stantard of excellence ... congratulations and thanks for the enormous work done... keep it up! :)

March 27, 2013 | 04:37 PM - Posted by Ryan Shrout

Thank you!  Help spread the word!

March 27, 2013 | 10:55 PM - Posted by TinkerToyTech

Posted to my facebook page

March 27, 2013 | 04:40 PM - Posted by Marty (not verified)

Ryan, I've a suspicion that you wanted to select Adaptive VSync on NVidia, but have selected Adaptive (half refresh rate) instead in the control panel. Would you please check it out.

March 28, 2013 | 02:20 AM - Posted by showb1z (not verified)

²

Other than that great article. Would also be interested in results with frame limiters.

March 27, 2013 | 05:23 PM - Posted by Dan (not verified)

This site is so awesome that it is one of th eonly ones that I disable Adblock in Chrome for. You deserve the ad $'s.

Rock on, Ryan and crew!

March 29, 2013 | 07:37 AM - Posted by Ryan Shrout

Thank you we appreciate it!

March 27, 2013 | 05:45 PM - Posted by Mike G (not verified)

Thanks for the all of the time taken to accurately test and then explain your frame rating methods to us. I wonder if AMD would be willing to have a representative come on and speak on how they will be addressing this issue. I for one will be holding off purchasing an additional 7970 at this time.

March 27, 2013 | 06:43 PM - Posted by bystander (not verified)

They have, with AnandTech, though the person they spoke to was the single GPU driver guy, they did mention they have a plan to offer fixes in July.
http://www.anandtech.com/tag/gpus

March 27, 2013 | 06:51 PM - Posted by Soulwager (not verified)

Is your capture hardware capable of capturing 1080p @ 120hz? The data rate should be less than 1440p@60hz.

Also, I would like to see some starcraft 2 results. It's frequently CPU limited, and I'm wondering how that impacts the final experience when compared to a gpu limited situation. I'd recommend the "unit preloader" map as a benchmark run, once to pre-load all the assets and again for the capture.

March 29, 2013 | 07:38 AM - Posted by Ryan Shrout

Actually, I think 1080p@120 is a higher pixel clock than 25x14@60; we tried to do basic 120 Hz testing right before publication without luck but we'll be trying again soon.

As for SC2, we'll take a look.

March 29, 2013 | 12:00 PM - Posted by Soulwager (not verified)

You're right, the pixel clock is higher. I guess I was only thinking about total number of pixels that need to be recorded, but the smaller resolution is more heavily impacted by overscan.

March 27, 2013 | 09:28 PM - Posted by SPBHM

great stuff.

I would be interested in seeing some results with some framerate limit, not from vsync, but another limit, something like FPS max 45 for Crysis 3 (higher than a single card, around the average for the CF), you can easily do that with dxtory

March 27, 2013 | 09:49 PM - Posted by Trey Long (not verified)

Its nice to see the truth come out. Save the excuses and fix it AMD.

March 28, 2013 | 03:41 AM - Posted by Carol Smith (not verified)

Why did you completely ignore AMD's RadeonPro freeware ?
Which offers and has offered Dynamic V-Sync that's superior to Nvidia's Adaptive V-Sync for years now.
Tom's Hardware seems to be the only site that actually used this utility to make a fair comparison between SLI and Crossfire.

RadeonPro's Dynamic V-Sync was shown to be clearly superior to Nvidia's Adapative V-Sync Implementation .

Here is the Tom's link
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/radeon-hd-7990-devil13-7970-x2,3329-...

I hope that you learn from your fellow journalist's to include this fantastic solution in your upcoming article.
Thanks for your hard work and good luck.

March 28, 2013 | 06:27 AM - Posted by Marty (not verified)

A frame limiter improves stuttering, but increases lag. You loose some Fps too. So you have to decide between the devil and lucifer in the case of Crossfire.

March 29, 2013 | 07:01 AM - Posted by Carol Smith (not verified)

Exact same thing with Nvidia SLI and Adaptive V-Sync, if you don't want stuttering you have to sacrifice framrates.

March 29, 2013 | 07:39 AM - Posted by Ryan Shrout

I'm going to take a look, but this is NOT "AMD's" software.

March 28, 2013 | 03:50 AM - Posted by Andre3000 (not verified)

Thanks for the eye opener! Which AMD drivers have been used for this review? I have read the article.. but i might have missed it?

March 29, 2013 | 07:39 AM - Posted by Ryan Shrout

For AMD we used 13.2 beta 7 and for NVIDIA we used 314.07.

March 29, 2013 | 08:27 AM - Posted by Steve (not verified)

Ryan: Is it possible to test AMD's CF with older drivers to see if this problem has been around for a long time or if it is a more recent problem with AMD's continuous driver upgrades to improve speeds?

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