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Corsair RM Series 550W Power Supply Review

Manufacturer: Corsair

Specifications and Packaging

Specifications

The Corsair RM550 power supply is rated for a combined, continuous output power of up to 550 watts and includes universal AC line input and active PFC.  The power supply incorporates a single +12V rail, which can supply up to 45.8A (550W). Corsair claims all RM Series PSUs are fully compatible with 4th generation Intel Core series processors. The RM550 conforms to ATX12V v2.4 and EPS 2.92 standards and is backward compatible with ATX12V 2.2 and ATX12V 3.01 systems.

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(Courtesy of Corsair)

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(Courtesy of Corsair)

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(Courtesy of Corsair)

Packaging and Parts

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The Corsair RM550 power supply arrived securely packed inside a standard retail box that lists the unit's main features and specifications on the outside. In addition to the power supply the package includes a power cord, mounting screws, wire ties, Corsair case badge, Warranty booklet, Safety booklet, and Corsair products Solution Guide. If you want a User’s Guide you will have to download it from the Corsair website.

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Note: The Corsair Link USB Dongle is sold separately.

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September 23, 2013 | 02:15 AM - Posted by sergio (not verified)

What do you think, is it OK to use this power supply in bottom-mounted-PSU cases? My concern is fan outake in limited space and directed downwar.? On loads below 50%, what's going to be with heat dissipation?

September 23, 2013 | 08:18 AM - Posted by jonnyguru (not verified)

sergio: Fans in power supplies are intake, not exhaust.

September 23, 2013 | 04:22 PM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

2 pci-e connectors a positive? That should be a negative. All 550w psu's in this day and age should have 4 pci-e connectors.

September 24, 2013 | 05:45 AM - Posted by rrr (not verified)

Unless you plan on running stuff like 2x 670 or 2x 7950, which is pushing 550W unit, I disagree.

2 PCI-E is IMO fine for 550W. Not so for 650W OTOH.

December 16, 2013 | 05:43 PM - Posted by psumaster (not verified)

There are videocards coming with 3 PCI-E, so I think at least 3 would be a good number. 2 PCI-E should be the default for 400W units.

September 24, 2013 | 09:19 AM - Posted by Mark "Dusty" D (not verified)

Lee, on the Specifications and Packaging page, the efficiency and fan noise curves show the x axis as sytem load (watts), but it is expressed in percentages of full load. Conversely, on the DC Load Regulation and AC Ripple page, it shows the wattage being drawn but would be more helpful in percent of full load.

March 1, 2014 | 07:05 PM - Posted by Anonymous Cowerd (not verified)

Would like an article
that compares the cost between the common recommendation
by all to take a PSU that's double your consumption
and a PSU that's just enough above your system consumption.

Example for calculated comparison:
PC1 peek consumption is 380w - PSU is 450W.
PC2 peek consumption is 380W - PSU is 750W.
(both the same 80+ rate)

PC#1 would be far from optimal, but buying cost is low.
PC#2 is in middle of the bell curve efficiency chart,
but cost more!

since the drop between PSU #2 & #1 efficiency is just few percent's would it make buying the more expansive PSU worth while, for the average warranty of the PSU?

Such article would greatly benefit PCPER community.

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