FMS 2016: Micron QuantX XPoint Prototype SSD Spotted

Subject: Storage | August 11, 2016 - 12:06 PM |
Tagged: FMS, FMS 2016, XPoint, micron, QuantX, nand, ram

Earlier this week, Micron launched their QuantX branding for XPoint devices, as well as giving us some good detail on expected IOPS performance of solutions containing these new parts:

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Thanks to the very low latency of XPoint, the QuantX solution sees very high IOPS performance at a very low queue depth, and the random performance very quickly scales to fully saturate PCIe 3.0 x4 with only four queued commands. Micron's own 9100 MAX SSD (reviewed here), requires QD=256 (64x increase) just to come close to this level of performance! At that same presentation, a PCIe 3.0 x8 QuantX device was able to double that throughput at QD=8, but what are these things going to look like?

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The real answer is just like modern day SSDs, but for the time being, we have the prototype unit pictured above. This is essentially an FPGA development board that Micron is using to prototype potential controller designs. Dedicated ASICs based on the final designs may be faster, but those take a while to ramp up volume production.

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So there it is, in the flesh, nicely packaged and installed on a complete SSD. Sure it's a prototype, but Intel has promised we will see XPoint before the end of the year, and I'm excited to see this NAND-to-DRAM performance-gap-filling tech come to the masses!

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FMS 2016: Liqid Combines Quad M.2 in to Powerful Packages

Subject: Storage | August 11, 2016 - 11:18 AM |
Tagged: FMS, FMS 2016, Liqid, kingston, toshiba, phison, U.2, HHHL, NVMe, ssd

A relative newcomer this year at Flash Memory Summit was Liqid. These guys are essentially creating an ecosystem from a subset of parts. Let's start with Toshiba:

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At Toshiba's booth, we spotted their XG3 being promoted as being part of the Liqid solution. We also saw a similar demo at the Phison booth, meaning any M.2 parts can be included as part of their design. Now let us get a closer look at the full package options and what they do:

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This demo, at the Kingston booth, showed a single U.2 device cranking out 835,000 4k IOPS. This is essentially saturating its PCIe 3.0 x4 link with random IO's, and it actually beats the Micron 9100 that we just reviewed!

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How can it pull this off? The trick is that there are actually four M.2 SSDs in that package, along with a PLX switch. The RAID must be handled on the host side, but so long as you have software that can talk to multiple drives, you'll get full speed from this part.

More throughput can be had by switching to a PCIe 3.0 x8 link on a HHHL form factor card:

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That's 1.3 million IOPS from a single HHHL device! Technically this is four SSDs, but still, that's impressively fast and is again saturating the bus, but this time it's PCIe 3.0 x8 being pegged!

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We'll be tracking Liqid's progress over the coming months, and we will definitely test these solutions as they come to market (we're not there just yet). More to follow from FMS 2016!

FMS 2016: Supermicro All-Flash NVMe Systems - Switching PCIe up to 48 SSDs!

Subject: Storage | August 11, 2016 - 10:59 AM |
Tagged: FMS, SYS-2028U-TN24R4T+, SYS-1028U-TN10RT+, supermicro, SSG-2028R-NR48N, server, NVMe, FMS 2016

Supermicro was at FMS 2016, showing off some of their NVMe chassis:

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The first model is the SYS-1028U-TN10RT+. This 1U chassis lets you hot swap 10 2.5" U.2 SSDs, connecting all lanes directly to the host CPUs.

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Supermicro's custom PCB and interposer links all 40 PCIe lanes to the motherboard / CPUs.

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Need more drives installed? Next up is the SYS-2028U-TN24R4T+, which uses a pair of PCIe switches to connect 24 U.2 SSDs to the same pair of CPUs.

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Need EVEN MORE drives installed? The SSG-2028R-NR48N uses multiple switches to connect 48 U.2 SSDs in a single 2U chassis! While the switches will limit the ultimate sequential throughput of the whole package to PCIe 3.0 x40, we know that when it comes to spreading workloads across multiple SSDs, bandwidth bottlenecks are not the whole story, as latency is greatly reduced for a given workload. With a fast set of U.2 parts installed in this chassis, the raw IOPS performance would likely saturate all threads / cores of the installed Xeons before it saturated the PCIe bus!

More to follow as we wrap up FMS 2016!

Source: Supermicro

Podcast #412 - 10TB Hard Drives and Le Grand Macho!!

Subject: Editorial | August 11, 2016 - 06:31 AM |
Tagged: video, Seagate, podcast, Le Grande Macho, 10TB

PC Perspective Podcast #412 - 08/11/2016

Join us this week as we discuss the new 10TB Seagate hard drive, Le Grand Macho cooler and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts:  Ken Addison, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, Sebastian Peak

Program length: 54:54
  • No show notes today, editing remotely!

ASUS Adds Radeon RX 470 and RX 460 to ROG STRIX Gaming Lineup

Subject: Graphics Cards | August 10, 2016 - 08:22 PM |
Tagged: video card, strix rx470, strix rx460, strix, rx 470, rx 460, ROG, Republic of Gamers, graphics, gpu, gaming, asus

Ryan posted details about the Radeon RX 470 and 460 graphics cards at the end of last month, and both are now available. Now the largest of the board partners, ASUS, has added both of these new GPUs to their Republic of Gamers STRIX series.

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The STRIX Gaming RX 470 (Image: ASUS)

ASUS announced the Radeon RX 470 STRIX Gaming cards last week, and today the more affordable RX 460 GPU variant has been announced. The RX 470 is certainly a capable gaming option as it's a slightly cut-down version of the RX 480 GPU, and with the two versions of the STRIX Gaming cards offering varying levels of overclocking, they can come even closer to the performance of a stock RX 480.

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The STRIX Gaming RX 460 (Image: ASUS)

The new STRIX Gaming RX 460 is significantly slower, with just 896 stream processors (to the 2048 of the RX 470) and a 128-bit memory interface (compared to 256-bit). Part of the appeal of the reference RX 460 - aside from low cost - is low power draw, as the <75W power draw allows for slot-powered board designs. This STRIX Gaming version adds a 6-pin power connector, however, which should provide additional overhead for further overclocking.

Specifications:

  STRIX-RX470-O4G-GAMING STRIX-RX470-4G-GAMING STRIX-RX460-O4G-GAMING
GPU AMD Radeon RX 470 AMD Radeon RX 470 AMD Radeon RX 460
Stream Processors 2048 2048 896
Memory 4GB GDDR5 4GB GDDR5 4GB GDDR5
Memory Clock 6600 MHz 6600 MHz 7000 MHz
Memory Interface 256-bit 256-bit 128-bit
Core Clock 1270 MHz (OC Mode)
1250 MHz (Gaming Mode)
1226 MHz (OC Mode)
1206 MHz (Gaming Mode)
1256 MHz (OC Mode)
1236 MHz (Gaming Mode)
Video Output DVI-D x2
HDMI 2.0
DisplayPort
DVI-D x2
HDMI 2.0
DisplayPort
DVI-D
HDMI 2.0
DisplayPort
Power Connection 6-pin 6-pin 6-pin
Dimensions 9.5" x 5.1" x 1.6" 9.5" x 5.1" x 1.6" 7.6" x 4.7" x 1.4"

The STRIX Gaming RX 470 OC 4GB is priced at $199, matching the (theoretical) retail of the 4GB RX 480, and the STRIX Gaming RX 470 is just behind at $189. The considerably lower-end STRIX Gaming RX 460 is $139. A check of Amazon/Newegg shows listings for these cards, but no in-stock units as of early this afternoon.

Source: ASUS

AMD Releases Radeon Software Crimson Edition 16.8.1

Subject: Graphics Cards | August 10, 2016 - 04:59 PM |
Tagged: amd, graphics drivers

Alongside the release of the Radeon RX 460 and RX 470 graphics cards, AMD has released the Radeon Software Crimson Edition 16.8.1 drivers. Beyond adding support for these new products, it also adds a Crossfire profile for F1 2016 and fixes a few issues, like Firefox and Overwatch crashing under certain circumstances. It also allows users of the RX 480 to overclock their memory higher than they previously could.

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AMD is continuing their trend of steadily releasing graphics drivers, and rapidly fixing important issues as they arise. Also, they have been verbose in their release notes, outlining fixes and known problems as they occur. Users can often track the bugs that affect them as they are added to the Known Issues, then graduated to Fixed Issues. While this often goes unrecognized, it's frustrating as a user to experience a bug and not know whether the company even knows about it, or they are just refusing to acknowledge it.

Useful release notes, like AMD has been publishing, are very helpful in that regard.

Source: AMD

Playing with VR, Call of the Starseed edition

Subject: General Tech | August 10, 2016 - 02:13 PM |
Tagged: gaming, starseed, VR, amd, nvidia, htc vive

When [H]ard|OCP looks at the performance of a VR game, be it a Vive or Rift title, they focus on the gameplay experience as opposed to benchmarks.  There are numerous reasons for this, from the fact that these games do not tend to stress GPUs like many triple A titles but also because the targets are different, steady render times below 11.1ms are the target as opposed to higher frame counts.  AMD initially had issues with this game, the newest driver release has resolved those issues completely.  The takeaway quote in [H]'s conclusions provide the most telling part of the review, "If we were to perform a blind gaming test, you would not be able to identify which GPU you were gaming with at the time."

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"We are back this week to take another objective look at AMD and NVIDIA GPU performance in one of the the top selling games in the VR-only realm, The Gallery Episode 1: Call of Starseed. This is another GPU-intensive title that has the ability to put some GPUs on their heels. How do the new RX 480 and GeForce 1000 series perform?"

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Gaming

Source: [H]ard|OCP

FMS 2016: Samsung To Announce 64-Layer 4th Gen V-NAND, 32TB 2.5" SSD

Subject: Storage | August 10, 2016 - 02:00 PM |
Tagged: 2.5, V-NAND, ssd, Samsung, nand, FMS 2016, FMS, flash, 64-Layer, 32TB, SAS, datacenter

At a huge press event like Flash Memory Summit, being in the right place at the right time (and with the right camera), matters greatly. I'll just let a picture say a thousand words for me here:

64-Layer V-NAND.jpg

..now this picture has been corrected for extreme parallax and was taken in far from ideal conditions, but you get the point. Samsung's keynote is coming up later today, and I have a hunch this will be a big part of what they present. We did know 64-Layer was coming, as it was mentioned in Samsung's last earnings announcement, but confirmation is nice.

*edit* now that the press conference has taken place, here are a few relevant slides:

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With 48-Layer V-NAND announced last year (and still rolling out), it's good to see Samsung pushing hard into higher capacity dies. 64-Layer enables 512Gbits (64GB) per die, and 100MB/s per die maximum throughput means even lower capacity SSDs should offer impressive sequentials.

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Samsung 48-Layer V-NAND. Pic courtesy of TechInsights.

64-Layer is Samsung's 4th generation of V-NAND. We've seen 48-Layer and 32-Layer, but few know that 24-Layer was a thing (but was mainly in limited enterprise parts).

We will know more shortly, but for now, dream of even higher capacity SSDs :)

*edit* and this just happened:

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*additional edit* - here's a better picture taken after the keynote:

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The 32TB model in their 2.5" form factor displaces last years 16TB model. The drive itself is essentially identical, but the flash packages now contain 64-layer dies, doubling the available capacity of the device.

FMS 2016: Seagate Demos Facebook Lightning, 60TB 3.5" SSD!

Subject: Storage | August 10, 2016 - 01:59 PM |
Tagged: FMS 2016, ssd, Seagate, Lightning, facebook, 60TB

Seagate showed off some impressive Solid State Storage at Flash Memory Summit 2016.

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First up is the Nytro XM1440. This is a 2TB M.2 22110 SSD complete with enterprise firmware and power loss protection. Nice little package, but what's it for?

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..well if you have 60 of them, you can put them into this impressive 1U chassis. This is Facebook's Lightning chassis (discussed yesterday). With Seagate's 2TB parts, this makes for 120TB of flash in a 1U footprint. Great for hyperscale datacenters.

Now onto what you came to see:

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This is the 'Seagate 60TB SAS SSD'. It really doesn't need a unique name because that capacity takes care of that for us! This is a 3.5" form factor SAS 12Gbit beast of a drive.

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They pulled this density off with a few tricks which I'll walk through. First was the stacking of three PCBs with flash packages on both sides. 80 packages in total.

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Next up is Seagate's ONFi fan-out ASIC. This is required because you can only have so many devices connected to a single channel / bus of a given SSD controller. The ASIC acts as a switch for data between the controller and flash dies.

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With so much flash present, we could use a bit of fault tolerance. You may recall RAISE from SandForce (who Seagate now owns). This is effectively RAID for flash dies, enabling greater resistance to individual errors across the array.

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Finally we have the specs. With a dual 12 Gbit SAS inteface, the 60TB SAS SSD can handle 1.5 GB/s reads, 1.0 GB/s writes, and offers 150,000 IOPS at 4KB QD32 random (SAS tops out at QD32). The idea behind drives like these is to cram as much storage into the smallest space possible, and this is certainly a step in the right direction.

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We also saw the XP7200 add-in card. I found this one interesting as it is a PCIe 3.0 x16 card with four M.2 PCIe 3.0 x4 SSDs installed, but *without* a PLX switch to link them to the host system. This is possible only in server systems supporting PCIe Bifurcation, where the host can recognize that certain sets of lanes are linked to individual components.

More to follow from FMS 2016! Press blast after the break.

be quiet!'s Silent Base 800, moderate price and moderate features

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 10, 2016 - 01:38 PM |
Tagged: be quiet!, Silent Base 800

It has been quite a while since Lee's review of the be quiet! Silent Base 800 so it is worth revisiting this case over at The Tech Report.  The price has not changed from the original launch but there do seem to be more colours available, up to and including orange. There are several features which could influence you to purchase the case, top mounted I/O ports and power button and the Pure Wings 2 fans included in the case.  On the other hand there is a distinctive lack of a reset button and the case is rather narrow and extra large GPUs will require the removal of drive cages.  Check out the full review to see whether this case holds any interest for you.

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"be quiet!'s Silent Base 800 full tower case features extensive silencing features throughout for quiet operation. We tested this case to see whether be quiet!'s noise-killing efforts deliver."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Retro nerd fight; something is amiss with the rebooted ZX Spectrum team

Subject: General Tech | August 10, 2016 - 12:44 PM |
Tagged: sinclair, ZX Spectrum Vega, Spectrum Vega+, crowdfunding

If you like your drama and tech mixed you should pop over to the The Inquirer to read about what is going on behind the scenes at Retro Computers Ltd, who successfully crowdfunded the return of the Sinclair ZX Spectrum.  Two founders and former directors quietly left the company back in April and are now loudly lawyering up in a suite they launched due to lack of communication from the remaining directors of Retro Computers.  In return Retro have revealed that they too have lawyers, which are demanding information about unaccounted company funds which they believe were siphoned off or otherwise mismanaged. 

Shortly after The Inquirer published their article both sides come out with updates about the case and more accusations.  It could prove to be an interesting saga, especially with the upcoming release of the Vega+.

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"Look, we're going to keep reporting this because it's fascinating, but at the same time, how much more of this dirty laundry is going to get aired, and why is it happening? There's a missing piece of the puzzle here. "

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer

BitFenix Announces the Aurora Enclosure with Tempered Glass and RGB Lighting

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 10, 2016 - 09:54 AM |
Tagged: tempered glass, SSD Chroma, RGB, mid tower, enclosure, e-atx, chassis, case, bitfenix, aurora, ASUS Aura

BitFenix has announced the Aurora chassis, their latest enclosure which features tempered glass side panels and RGB lighting effects.

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Both sides of the Aurora are covered by tempered glass, with the component side a clear panel, and the back a dark-tinted panel to help hide cables behind the motherboard tray.

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One interesting feature is called “SSD Chroma”. BitFenix explains:

“‘ASUS AURA’ certified ‘RGB Chroma Control and SSD Chroma’ are co-developed with Asus Republic of Gamers giving you the ability to customize and illuminate the SSDs.”

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Specifications and highlights from BitFenix:

  • Colors: Black│White
  • Materials: Steel, ABS
  • Supported Motherboards: E-ATX│ATX│M-ATX│Mini-ITX
  • Expansion Slots: 7
  • Drive Bays:
    • 3.5”: 2 + 2
    • 2.5”: 2 + 1
  • Cooling:
    • Front: 120mm x 2 or 140mm x 2
    • Rear: 120mm x 1 (Included)
    • Top: 120mm x 2 or 140mm x 2
  • Component Clearance:
    • CPU Cooler: Up to 160mm height
    • Graphic Card Length: Up to 400mm
    • Power Supply: Up to 220mm
  • I/O: USB 3.0 x 2│USB 2.0 x 2│HD Audio MIC & Headphone
  • Weight: 10.58kg
  • Dimensions: 215 x 490 x 520mm

Highlights: BitFenix LED Lighting Controller & SSD Lighting Bracket│20-25mm Cable Management Space│Graphic Length up to 400mm│Support Dual 280mm radiator│Removable HDD cage│Removable PSU Dust Filter


Pricing and availablility for this new BitFenix Aurora are not yet known late August and $99 US.

Source: BitFenix

Mechanically sound, the Patriot Viper V760

Subject: General Tech | August 9, 2016 - 06:54 PM |
Tagged: input, patriot, viper v760, Kailh, RGB LED

Patriot have been focusing on peripherals as of late, while still more commonly known for volatile memory they have branched out into numerous other product lines.  The Viper V760 uses Kailh switches equivalent to Cherry MX Brown; of the RGB LED variety for this is another colourful keyboard.  Techgage tried out this keyboard in their latest review, appreciating many of the features of the board, perhaps most notibly the price of $100 or less.

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"While mechanical keyboards have slowly become ubiquitous, not everyone has had a chance to try one out. For this article, we not only test out the latest keyboard from long-time memory company Patriot, with its Viper V760, we take a look at it from a new perspective – the perspective of someone who’s never used a mech before."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Techgage

Mobile speed, the Samsung Portable SSD T3

Subject: Storage | August 9, 2016 - 06:44 PM |
Tagged: ssd t3, Samsung, portable storage

Just because you are on the road there is no reason to subject yourself to HDD speeds when transferring files.  Not only will an SSD be quieter and more resilient but the USB 3.1 Gen 1 Type C port theoretically offers up to 450MB/s transfer speeds.  This particular 2TB portable SSD uses the same MGX controller as the 850 EVO, the NAND is Samsung's 48-layer TLC V-NAND.  The Tech Report previously tried out the T1 model so their expectations were that this drive would improve performance in addition to offering larger sizes of drive.  Does it live up to expectations?  Find out in their full review.

Al just reminded yours truly we posted a review of the T3 back in February.

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"Not all new SSDs go inside your computer. We take a quick look at Samsung's latest V-NAND-powered external drive, the Portable SSD T3, to see what it's like to put 2TB of fast storage in one's pocket."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

FMS 2016: Facebook Talks WORM QLC NAND Flash, Benchmarks XPoint

Subject: Storage | August 9, 2016 - 05:59 PM |
Tagged: XPoint, Worm, storage, ssd, RocksDB, Optane, nand, flash, facebook

At their FMS 2016 Keynote, Facebook gave us some details on the various storage technologies that fuel their massive operation:

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In the four corners above, they covered the full spectrum of storing bits. From NVMe to Lightning (huge racks of flash (JBOF)), to AVA (quad M.2 22110 NVMe SSDs), to the new kid on the block, WORM storage. WORM stands for Write Once Read Many, and as you might imagine, Facebook has lots of archival data that they would like to be able to read quickly, so this sort of storage fits the bill nicely. How do you pull off massive capacity in flash devices? QLC. Forget MLC or TLC, QLC stores four bits per cell, meaning there are 16 individual voltage states for each cell. This requires extremely precise writing techniques and reads must appropriately compensate for cell drift over time, and while this was a near impossibility with planar NAND, 3D NAND has more volume to store those electrons. This means one can trade the endurance gains of 3D NAND for higher bit density, ultimately enabling SSDs upwards of ~100TB in capacity. The catch is that they are rated at only ~150 write cycles. This is fine for archival storage requiring WORM workloads, and you still maintain NAND speeds when it comes to reading that data later on, meaning that decade old Facebook post will appear in your browser just as quickly as the one you posted ten minutes ago.

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Next up was a look at some preliminary Intel Optane SSD results using RocksDB. Compared to a P3600, the prototype Optane part offers impressive gains in Facebook's real-world workload. Throughput jumped by 3x, and latency reduced to 1/10th of its previous value. These are impressive gains given this fairly heavy mixed workload.

More to follow from FMS 2016!

Windows 10 Rollback Period Cut to 10 Days

Subject: General Tech | August 9, 2016 - 05:21 PM |
Tagged: windows 10, microsoft

According to ComputerWorld, Microsoft has decided that their 30-day rollback period is too long, and so they reduced it to 10 days with version 1607. Honestly, 30 days seemed a bit too long to leave (in my case) 30 GB of crap laying around your main drive, especially considering a new build is dropped to the public once every six to nine months or so. They should have an interface for users to easily delete early, and maybe even a power-user tool to move it to external storage or something.

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This should not affect users who upgrade from Windows 7 and 8.x, unless the rules have changed since the November (1511) update. A non-Windows Insider machine will only install a new build of Windows 10 if the previous install was a clean install, or if the rollback period has already timed out. Also, users can still return to Windows 7 or Windows 8.x by performing a clean install with their respective product key, and Microsoft still provides ISOs on their website even if the user lost their install DVD.

That said, Microsoft still should make this much more clear in their interface, though. Looking at the Settings page, above, there doesn't seem to be any indication that my time is running out. Not cool.

FMS 2016: Micron Keynote Teases XPoint (QuantX) Real-World Performance

Subject: Storage | August 9, 2016 - 03:33 PM |
Tagged: XPoint, QuantX, nand, micron

Micron just completed their keynote address at Flash Memory Summit, and as part of the presentation, we saw our first look at some raw scaled Queue Depth IOPS performance figures from devices utilizing XPoint memory:

U.2.jpg

These are the performance figures from an U.2 device with a PCIe 3.0 x4 link. Note the outstanding ramp up to full saturation of the bus at a QD of only 4. Slower flash devices require much more parallelism and a deeper queue to achieve sufficient IOPS throughput to saturate that same bus. That 'slow' device on the bottom there, I'm pretty certain, is Micron's own 9100 MAX, which was the fastest thing we had tested to date, and it's being just walked all over by this new XPoint prototype!

Ok, so that's damn fast, but what if you had an add in card with PCIe 3.0 x8?

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Ok, now that's just insane! While the queue had to climb to ~8 to reach these figures, that's 1.8 MILLION IOPS from a single HHHL add in card. That's greater than 7 GB/s worth of 4KB random performance!

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In addition to the crazy throughput and IOPS figures, we also see latencies running at 1/10th that of flash-based NVMe devices.

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..so it appears that while the cell-level performance of XPoint boasts 1000x improvements over flash, once you implement it into an actual solution that must operate within the bounds of current systems (NVMe and PCIe 3.0), we currently get only a 10x improvement over NAND flash. Given how fast NAND already is, 10x is no small improvement, and XPoint still opens the door for further improvement as the technology and implementations mature over time.

More to follow as FMS continues!

Can Netlist use Samsung in their upcoming HybriDIuMM to challenge Intels XPoint?

Subject: General Tech | August 9, 2016 - 02:55 PM |
Tagged: XPoint, Samsung, Intel, HybriDIMM

Bit of a correction folks, Netlist developed the HybriDIMMs using Samsung DRAM and NAND, united using their own proprietary interface. This, and my confusion, is in part to do some nasty and very costly IP litigation behind the scenes which lead to Samsung getting more credit for this than they deserved. 

Netlist and Diablo Technologies worked together for a while and then parted ways.  Soon after the split Diablo licensed SMART to produce ULLtraDIMMs and a court case was born. Not long afterwards SanDisk grabbed the IP from Diablo and now WD is buying SanDisk, making this an utter nightmare for a smaller company.  Samsung invested $23m in Netdisk and offered  a source of chips, albeit likely with strings, which has allowed Netdisk to develop HybriDIMMs. 

Samsung Netlist has developed HybriDIMMs, replacing some of the DRAM on a memory module with NAND.  This allows you to significantly increase the amount of memory available on a DIMM and reduces the price dramatically at the same time.  The drawback is that NAND is significantly slower than DRAM; they intend to overcome that with the use of predictive algorithms they have called PreSight to pre-fetch data from the NAND and stage it in DRAM.  This will compete with Intel's Optane XPoint DIMMs once they are released and will mean the DRAM market will split into two, the DRAM we are currently used to and these hybrid NAND DIMMs.  Check out more details over at The Register.

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"Gold plate can give a durable and affordable alloy a 24-carat veneer finish, adding value to cheap metal. DRAM gives Samsung-Netlist Hybrid DIMMs a cache veneer, providing what looks like DRAM to applications but is really persistent NAND underneath, cheaper than DRAM and lots of it."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Register

FMS 2016: Micron Launches 3D UFS SSDs, Brands 3D XPoint as QuantX

Subject: Storage | August 9, 2016 - 01:09 PM |
Tagged: XPoint, UFS, QuantX, micron, FMS 2016, FMS

The UFS standard aims to bring us lightning fast microSD cards that perform on-par with SATA SSDs. Samsung introduced theirs earlier this month, and now Micron has announced their solution:

Mobile 3D NAND UFS with specs and logo.jpg

As you can see, UFS is not just for SD cards. These are going to be able to replace embedded memory in mobile devices, displacing the horror that is eMMC with something way faster. These devices are smaller than a penny, with a die size of just over 60 mm squared and boast a 32GB capacity.

UFS.png

One version of the UFS 2.1 devices also contains Micron's first packaged offering of LPDDR4X. This low power RAM offers an additional 20% power savings over existing LPDDR4.

Also up is an overdue branding of Micron's XPoint (spoken 'cross-point') products:

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QuantX will be the official branding of Micron products using XPoint technology. This move is similar to the one Intel made at IDF 2015, where they dubbed their solutions with the Optane moniker.

More to follow from FMS 2016. A few little birdies told me there will be some good stuff presented this morning (PST), so keep an eye out, folks!

Press blast for Micron's UFS goodness appears after the break.

Xbox One S is Compact, Power Efficient, and (Slightly) Faster

Subject: General Tech | August 8, 2016 - 11:06 PM |
Tagged: xbox one s, xbox one, TSMC, microsoft, console, 16nm

Microsoft recently unleashed a smaller version of its gaming console in the form of the Xbox One S. The new "S" variant packs an internal power supply, 4K Blu-ray optical drive, and a smaller (die shrunk) AMD SoC into a 40% smaller package. The new console is clad in all white with black accents and a circular vent on left half of the top. A USB port and pairing button has been added to the front and the power and eject buttons are now physical rather than capacitive (touch sensitive).

Rear I/O remains similar to the original console and includes a power input, two HDMI ports (one input, one output), two USB 3.0 ports, one Ethernet, one S/PDIF audio out, and one IR out port. There is no need for the power brick anymore though as the power supply is now internal. Along with being 40% smaller, it can now be mounted vertically using an included stand. While there is no longer a dedicated Kinect port, it is still possible to add a Kinect to your console using an adapter.

Microsoft Xbox One S Gaming Console 4K Media BluRay UHD.jpg

The internal specifications of the Xbox One S remain consistent with the original Xbox One console except that it will now be available in a 2TB model. The gaming console is powered by a nearly identical processor that is now 35% smaller thanks to being manufactured on a smaller 16nm FinFet process node at TSMC. While the chip is more power efficient, it still features the same eight Jaguar CPU cores clocked at 1.75 GHz and 12 CU graphics portion (768 stream processors). Microsoft and AMD now support HDR and 4K resolutions and upscaling with the new chip. The graphics portion is where the new Xbox One S gets a bit interesting because it appears that Microsoft has given the GPU a bit of an overclock to 914 MHz. Compared to the original Xbox One's 853 MHz, this is a 7.1% increase in clockspeed. The increased GPU clocks also results in increased bandwidth for the ESRAM (204 GB/s on the original Xbox One versus 219 GB/s on the Xbox One S).

According to Microsoft, the increased GPU clockspeeds were necessary to be able to render non HDR versions of the game for Game DVR, Game Streaming, and taking screenshots in real time. A nice side benefit to this though is that the extra performance can result in improved game play in certain games. In Digital Foundry's testing, Richard Leadbetter found this to be especially true in games with unlocked frame rates or in games that are 30 FPS locked but where the original console could not hit 30 FPS consistently. The increased clocks can be felt in slightly smoother game play and less screen tearing. For example, they found that the Xbox One S got up to 11% higher frames in Project Cars (47 FPS versus 44) and between 6% to 8% in Hitman. Further, they found that the higher clocks help performance in playing Xbox 360 games on the Xbox One in backwards compatibility mode such as Alan Wake's American Nightmare.

The 2TB Xbox One S is available now for $400 while the 1TB ($350) and 500GB ($300) versions will be available on the 23rd. For comparison, the 500GB Xbox One (original) is currently $250. The Xbox One 1TB game console varies in price depending on game bundle.

What are your thoughts on the smaller console? While the ever so slight performance boost is a nice bonus, I definitely don't think that it is worth specifically upgrading for if you already have an Xbox One. If you have been holding off, now is the time to get a discounted original or smaller S version though! If you are hoping for more performance, definitely wait for Microsoft's Scorpio project or it's competitor the PlayStation 4 Neo (or even better a gaming PC right!? hehe).

I do know that Ryan has gotten his hands on the slimmer Xbox One S, so hopefully we will see some testing of our own as well as a teardown (hint, hint!).

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Source: Eurogamer