Intel expands its grasp into wearables and robots

Subject: General Tech | January 14, 2016 - 01:15 PM |
Tagged: Intel, drone, wearables, realsense, DOMINATION

Intel is planning on getting inside a wider variety of pants, as well as drones and robots in the very near future, diversifying out of a PC market which has not been growing at an attractive place for over a year.  They certainly have the budget to do so as well as several technologies which will give them powerful leverage in those markets.  One example that immediately leaps to mind is selling drones with Intel RealSense sensors installed, the extra functionality that would be added to the drone would be impressive.  Intel's Curie SoC will be found in eyeglasses and clothing in the not too distant future and they have partnered with robot manufacturers to ensure their chips will compatible with the wide variety of operating systems used in controlling robots.  You can glean more about their plans over at The Register.

Intel-RealSense-Camera.jpg

"The need to control not just the processor itself, but the whole surrounding software and connectivity platform, was very clear in Intel’s launches and keynotes a last week's Consumer Electronics Show."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Register

Podcast #382 - News from CES 2016, R9 Nano price cut, 13TB SSD and more

Subject: General Tech | January 14, 2016 - 12:53 PM |
Tagged: video, ultrasharp, synology, supermicro, Seagate, r9 nano, podcast, oled, dell, Dark Power Pro, CES 2016, CES, carizzo, be quiet!, amd, 13tb ssd, 10TB

PC Perspective Podcast #382 - 01/14/2016

Join us this week as we wrap up news from CES 2016, discuss the R9 Nano price cut, ponder a 13TB SSD and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

  • iTunes - Subscribe to the podcast directly through the iTunes Store
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  • MP3 - Direct download link to the MP3 file

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, and Allyn Malventano

Subscribe to the PC Perspective YouTube Channel for more videos, reviews and podcasts!!

Fixstars Launches 13TB 2.5" SATA SSD Geared Towards Media Streaming

Subject: Storage | January 13, 2016 - 09:57 PM |
Tagged: ssd, sata, Fixstars, 13TB

Got a high bandwidth video camera that fills a piddly 4TB SSD in too short of a time? How about a 13TB SSD!

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Fixstars certainly gets cool points for launching such a high capacity SSD, but there are a few things to consider here. These are not meant to be written in a random fashion and are primarily geared towards media creation (8k RAW video). Filling at saturated SATA bandwidth, these will take about 7 hours to fill, and just as long to empty onto that crazy high end editing machine. But hey, if you can afford 13TB of flash (likely ~$13,000) just to record your video content, then your desktop should be even beefier.

The take home point here is that this is not a consumer device, and it would not work out well even for pro gamers with money to burn. The random write performance is likely poor enough that it could not handle a Steam download over a high end broadband link.

Full press blast after the break.

Source: Fixstars

Microsoft Releases Windows 10 Insider Build 11099

Subject: General Tech | January 13, 2016 - 08:18 PM |
Tagged: microsoft, windows 10

The second Insider release on the “Redstone” branch has been pushed to Fast ring users. Once again, this has basically no release notes because a lot of features are “under the hood.” The push with Windows 10 since just before the holidays is to create a sensible structure for various teams to target with their changes. You could imagine how difficult this gets when you're dealing with phones, IoT, tablets and convertibles, HoloLens, and high-performance workstations, across a few different architectures.

windows-10.png

Insiders who are interested in UX updates and other features will probably be best to switch to “Slow” for a handful of builds once they find one that's stable for them. I can't really see this being useful for most Insiders, because unlike open-source previews where you can contribute to (or develop software alongside of) the internal tweaks, all you really can do is report when something is broken or acting funny. If that's what you want, then it's great that Microsoft is providing these previews.

Source: Microsoft

Catalyst Crimson Edition 16.1 Hotfix Drivers Released

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 13, 2016 - 07:42 PM |
Tagged: graphics drivers, amd

AMD's recent “Hotfix” drivers don't seem to mean what NVIDIA's does. In the Green Team's case, they usually fix one or two issues that slipped past QA. While they likely won't break anything, they are probably a bad idea to install if you're not experiencing the listed problems. The changelog on AMD's drivers are significantly longer with a list of known issues that is roughly the same size.

amd-2015-crimson-logo.png

So should you install it? That depends. It's a little less cut-and-dry than NVIDIA's hotfixes, which are only useful for a handful of people. It sounds like the worst known issue is “Game stuttering may be experienced when running two Radeon R9 295X2 graphics cards in CrossFire mode” and “Display corruption may occur on multiple display systems when it has been running idle for some time.” The latter would affect me greatly, because I run four displays and basically never sleep or shutdown (except for updates). On the other hand, it fixes a variety of crash, hang, and flicker issues.

Check it out. If it sounds good, then pick it up. Otherwise, wait for the next Beta or WHQL driver.

Source: AMD

Seagate Breaks into Helium Market with 10TB Enterprise Capacity Hard Drive

Subject: Storage | January 13, 2016 - 02:38 PM |
Tagged: Seagate, helium, hdd, enterprise, 3.5, 10TB

Seagate updated their Enterprise Capacity line of HDDs this morning with a monster of a 10TB unit:

Seagate 10TB Helium.jpg

To achieve this capacity, Seagate switched over to a sealed, Helium filled design (similar to what HGST has been doing for a few years now). Since filling the space of a HDD with Helium helps reduce head flutter and platter thickness, Seagate was able to fit seven platters into a standard 3.5" housing. As an additional note, this drive uses the same PMR (Perpendicular Magnetic Recording) as other recent generation units, and not the SMR (Shingled) employed in their recent 8TB Archive HDD. PMR is a good thing here, as it enables random write access without the performance penalty incurred when attempting the same on an SMR drive.

The Helium filling pushes the MTBF up to 2.5 million hours. Unfortunately the release was light on the other details, and we do not have pricing as of yet, but we will certainly be keeping an eye on this one. Seagate states they are 'shipping to select customers', but given that those customers are ordering by the truckload, it may be some time before we see them in the OEM aftermarket channels.

Full press blast after the break.

Source: BusinessWire

Need a hand picking a low power ARM system?

Subject: Systems | January 13, 2016 - 02:36 PM |
Tagged: arm, raspberry pi zero, jetson tk1, JetsonTX1

If you are curious how the various ARM powered boards currently on the market compare to each other then the gang over at Phoronix has a real treat for you.  They have assembled a plethora of systems including the ODROID C1+, Raspberry Pi Zero, Raspberry Pi 2, Orange Pi Plus, Orange Pi PC, Banana Pi M2 as well as the Jetson TK1, and Jetson TX1 for comparison purposes.  Most of the systems use a Cortex A7 though you will also see an A5 as well as an A57.  The tests are varied as it can be difficult to determine what performance should be benchmarked on these systems although some like the OpenSSL test are obvious.  Since part of the reason you would choose a low power ARM system is the price, they wrap up with a performance-per-dollar rating to help you choose the best valued system for what you need it to do.

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"For those interested in small, low-power ARM single-board computers, up for your viewing pleasure today are benchmarks of several different boards from the Raspberry Pi Zero to the Banana Pi M2."

Here are some more Systems articles from around the web:

Systems

Source: Phoronix

Just when I thought I was out you pull me back in again; Goat Simulator Payday tomorrow!

Subject: General Tech | January 13, 2016 - 01:36 PM |
Tagged: gaming, goat simulator, payday, kick ass

Coffee Stain Studios is at it again with another update to Goat Simulator, this time themed after the Payday series of games.  Four goats, Valentino "The Flamingo" Salami, Dolph "The Dolphin" Spaghetti, Humphrey "The Camel" Ciabatta and Don "The Enforcer" Pastrami will hit the streets and start carjacking, water spitting, collecting masks and just generally wreaking chaos upon an unsuspecting world.  The addin will be released tomorrow and if it is like GoatZ it will cost you a couple of bucks for a lot of entertainment.  Watch the video below or just head over to the official site for a look at flying cars and the Goat Squad in action.

"Use your goat crew to smash & grab, then blast away all your money at Mahatma Gambling and the Indian casino just like in that Al Cappuccino movie"

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Gaming

 

Synology Launches DiskStation DS416j NAS

Subject: Storage | January 13, 2016 - 01:20 PM |
Tagged: synology, NAS, DSM, DS416j, diskstation

Synology has updated their popular DiskStation line with a new sleek looking 4-bay unit:

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The DiskStation DS416j is equipped with a Marvell Armada 88F6828 dual-core CPU running at 1.3 GHz coupled to 512MB of DDR3. This boost in specs enables a claimed 37% increase in write speed performance, bringing that spec up to just over 100 MB/sec. Reads are claimed at 112 MB/sec, which basically means it is saturating its Gigabit Ethernet link.

DS416j.png

In addition to the four installed HDDs, the DS416j can accept additional external drives via its rear panel USB 2.0 and USB 3.0 ports (one each). The new DSM 5.2 should run even smother and faster on this updated hardware. Despite the speed increase, the new model looks to be very power efficient, claiming 13W in hibernation (HDDs spun down) and 22W during access.

Full press blast appears after the break.

Source: Synology

It's fixed now but for a while there your Ring let people into more than just the door

Subject: General Tech | January 13, 2016 - 12:27 PM |
Tagged: ring, iot, security, gainspan

The Ring WiFi enabled video doorbell, with optional smartlock compatibility to let visitors in remotely, would also share your WiFi password to anyone who knew how to ask.  Just use a Torx screwdriver to pop the doorbell off, press the setup button on the back and connect to the Ring and you can get the networks SSID and PSK in plain text.  Thankfully Ring has pushed out an update to resolve this issue but it is a perfect demonstration of the abysmal security on IoT devices and the lack of any thought about security implications by users or makers of these new devices.  The Register also mentions the Fitbit Aria bathroom scale as being vulnerable in the exact same way as it also uses Gainspan wireless, though at least the scale is inside your house, not accessible to anyone wandering by.

ring.jpg

"Security researchers have discovered a glaring security hole that exposes the home network password of users of a Wi-Fi-enabled video doorbell. The issue – now resolved – underlines how default configurations of IoT components can introduce easy to exploit security holes."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Register

EKWB Issues Recall for v1.0 Predator 240 / 360 Liquid CPU Coolers

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 13, 2016 - 12:11 PM |
Tagged: water cooling, recall, Predator 360, predator 240, liquid CPU cooler, EKWB, ek, AIO

EKWB has issued a recall for all first-generation Predator 240 and 360 liquid CPU coolers due to risk of leakage. A new version (v1.1) of both self-contained coolers has been introduced to address the issue, and EK will provide one of the new units for those seeking a replacement.

revisions.jpg

Visual differences between Revision 1.0 (left) and Revision 1.1 (right) (via EKWB)

EKWB is also taking responsibility for any component damage that may have resulted from any leaks, offering refunds for defective units (if a replacement is not desired) and affected components.

From EKWB:

"All Revision 1.0 units produced from October 2015 until end of December 2015 are potentially affected by the risk of leakage and in order to prevent any computer component damage, the units need to be replaced. The leakage may occur between copper cold plate and bracket on the water block after it is heated up and pressure rises. Current statistics show that 1 out of 10 units leaks.

We are warning all customers of EK XLC-Predator units to discontinue use of cooling device and contact EKWB for replacement unit or refund. EKWB is taking full responsibility for this issue and will be:

  • Replacing or refunding all returned units to the customers
  • Refunding the customer any computer component damage created by a leakage

EKWB has redesigned and released a new version of EK-XLC Predator (Revision 1.1) on the 4th of January 2016 that prevents any leakage under normal working modes. All customers with Revision 1.0 units will be offered a replacement R1.1 unit or a full refund. Revision 1.0 backplate is not compatible with Revision 1.1 backplate!"

The full notice from the EKWB page is reproduced after the break.

Source: EKWB

Mini-STX Has Arrived: Meet the ECS H110SU-02 Motherboard

Subject: Motherboards | January 13, 2016 - 07:00 AM |
Tagged: small form factor, SFF, mini-stx, LGA 1151, Intel H110, ECS, CES 2016, CES

ECS has entered the brand new Mini-STX market with their H110SU-02 motherboard, one of our first looks at a motherboard based on Intel's 5x5 concept for a sub-mITX form-factor.

ecs_mstx_1.jpg

The ECS H110SU-02 (Image credit: Maximum PC)

As you can see this tiny motherboard offers a standard LGA 1151 socket for Intel processors up to 65W, and uses SoDIMM memory (DDR4). The board only offers one SATA port, with a pair of M.2 slots in a stacked configuration for both full-length (2280) SSDs and the shorter (2230) cards such as wireless network adapters.

Specifications:

  • Platform: Intel H110/B150 chipset
  • CPU: LGA1151 socket for Intel i3/i5/i7/Pentium/Celeron Processors (65W)
  • Memory: 2x SO-DIMM DDR4 slots
  • Storage: 1x M.2 Slot (2280); 1x SATA
  • Networking: RJ45; 1x M.2 Slot (2230) for Wi-Fi/Bluetooth 4.0 card
  • USB: 1x USB 3.1 Type-C; 2x USB 3.0 ports
  • Audio: 3.5 mm combo jack
  • Power Supply: DC-in 19V, 90W
  • Dimensions (W x D) 140 x 147 mm

ecs_mstx_2.jpg

Mini-SFX vs. Mini-ITX comparison (Image credit: Maximum PC)

Maximum PC posted this video with their overview of the motherboard:

With no PCI Express slot and the limitation of a 65W processor (which eliminates current high-end models such as the Core i7-6700K and Core i5-6600K, both at 91W) this is targeting a different audience than those choosing mini-ITX for a small gaming rig, for example. Still, there will undoubtedly be a number of applications for a system of just over 5 inches square; though Intel's existing NUC platform provides essentially the same experience in a smaller package, minus the socketed desktop CPU support, of course.

No details were given on pricing or availability.

Source: Maximum PC

CES 2016: TP-Link First To Launch 802.11ad Router

Subject: Networking | January 13, 2016 - 12:03 AM |
Tagged: wireless router, tp-link, mu-mimo, gigabit ethernet, CES 2016, 802.11ad, 802.11ac

Last week, TP-Link launched a new wireless router that is the first to support the 802.11ad "WiGig" standard alongside the usual fare of wireless AC, N, B, G, and A Wi-Fi networks. Sporting eight foldable external antennas, the TP-Link Talon AD7200 will be available within the next few months.

The Talon AD7200 features four Gigabit Ethernet ports, two USB 3.0 ports, eight antennas, and an all black casing with status LEDs lighting up the front panel. Two Qualcomm Atheros chipsets along with an unspecified dual core processor clocked at 1.4 GHz make up the internal hardware. One Atheros chipset is solely for the new 802.11ad radio while the other handles the remaining networks.

TP-Link Talon AD7200.jpg

On the wireless side of things, the router supports simultaneous operation of a 5 GHz 802.11ac, 2.4 GHz 802.11n, and a 60 GHz 802.11ad network. Throughput is rated at up to 1,733 Mbps on the 5 GHz band, 800 Mbps on the 2.4 GHz, and an impressive 4,600 Mbps on the 60 GHz band. The 802.11ad network support is the really interesting part of this router. While the 60 GHz band allows for super fast connections, it has a range of only a few meters and it needs a clear line of sight without any obstructions – the signal can't pass through a person or even a decorative plant for example. This standard was initially intended for the connected living room that would allow users to stream or copy high bit-rate media from a mobile device or computer to your television. In that respect, the 60 GHz band works well and offers up plenty of bandwidth for the job. 

The router allows hand-offs from 802.11ad to 802.11ac/n/b/a (eg. when you leave the room you can still stay connected to the network and internet, just on the slower but still fast enough for Internet access network) and supports beamforming and multi-user MIMO. It is using an allegedly user friendly firmware.

It is strange to see a router supporting the standard though when a direct Wi-Fi connection between the computer and TV should do fine. It does open up some interesting possibilities though. Right now, consumer devices supporting 10 Gigabit Ethernet are extremely rare and still not very affordable. With 1 Gigabit links being commonplace for a number of years now they have started to be surpassed by 802.11ac Wi-Fi in (theoretical) throughput (though the ol' hardwired connection still holds stability and latency benefits). There is a new standard NBASE-T aimed at bridging the gap between 1 GbE and 10 GbE for home users that hits 2.5 Gbps and 5 Gbps but that is still very much in its infancy. If you had an 802.11ad access point in every room, or at least the places you needed high bandwidth connections, it would be a definite improvement over a Gigabit Ethernet connection for large file transfers (think a backup to a NAS or offloading pictures and video from your laptop or phone to your desktop for editing). Of course, WiGig docks are also a thing, and offer a wireless alternative to a Thunderbolt docking station.

802.11ad is not revolutionary and it has it's limitations, but it is extremely fast. I'm interested to see the benchmarks and what sort of setup this router will enable. According to Ars Technica, Lenovo and Acer have WiGig laptops and WiGig docks coming out this year, and hopefully USB 3.0 WiGig cards will come out before the end of the year. I have a need for networking speed.

Also read:

Coverage of CES 2016 is brought to you by Logitech!

PC Perspective's CES 2016 coverage is sponsored by Logitech.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: TP-Link

GeForce Hotfix Driver 361.60 Released

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 12, 2016 - 08:11 PM |
Tagged: graphics drivers, graphics driver, nvidia

NVIDIA has been pushing for WHQL certification for their drivers, but sometimes issues slip through QA, both at Microsoft and their own, internal team(s). Sometimes these issues will be fixed in a future release, but sometimes they push out a “HotFix” driver immediately. This is often great for people who experience the problems, but they should not be installed otherwise.

nvidia-2015-bandaid.png

In this case, GeForce Hotfix driver 361.60 fixes two issues. One is listed as “install & clocking related issues,” which refers to the GPU memory clock. According to Manuel Guzman of NVIDIA, some games and software was not causing the driver to fully wake the memory clock to a high-performance state. The other issue is “Crashes in Photoshop & Illustrator,” which fixes blue screen issues in both software, and possibly other programs that use the GPU in similar ways. I've never seen GeForce Driver 361.43 cause a BSOD in Photoshop, but I am a few versions behind with CS5.5.

Download links are available at NVIDIA Support, but unaffected users should just wait for an official driver in case the patch causes other issues, due to its minimal QA.

Source: NVIDIA

SilverStone Displays Early Mini-STX Enclosure

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 12, 2016 - 02:20 PM |
Tagged: small form factor, Silverstone, SFF case, mini-stx, Intel 5x5, enclosure, CES 2016, CES

SilverStone had an early enclosure on display at CES for the upcoming Mini-STX standard, the tiny form-factor introduced with Intel's "5x5" motherboard (which we first reported on almost exactly one year ago).

DSC_0191.jpg

The simple black metal enclosure (as yet unnamed) looked and felt like a production unit, but we are still in the early stages with the first mini-STX motherboards being announced only this week. No details were given on when it would be available for purchase, or exactly how much it will cost.

DSC_0193.jpg

It is interesting to note the enclosure's I/O, which should indicate the standard for the new motherboards. On the front panel we had openings for a standard USB and Type-C port, and 3.5 mm audio; around back there were two more USB ports, LAN, DisplayPort, and HDMI. To the left of the HDMI port you can see the power input for the external power supply, as mini-STX will have a lot in common with the thin mini-ITX standard. (Thin mini-ITX optionally supported internal PSUs, but given the space constraints it looks like the mini-STX boards will be using a laptop style power supply.)

DSC_0194.jpg

The tiny Mini-STX enclosure fits easily in one hand

We will await any official announcement of this (and any other) upcoming mini-STX enclosure from SilverStone.

Source: SilverStone

Zalman enters the mechanical keyboard market, meet their ZM-K700M

Subject: General Tech | January 12, 2016 - 02:00 PM |
Tagged: ZM-K700M, zalman, mechanical keyboard, input, cherry mx red

For a market that barely existed outside of a few users pining about a certain old IBM keyboard, the range of mechanical keyboards that have appeared over the past couple of years is incredible.  Another company recently joined this market, Zalman has released the ZM-K700M LED keyboard, which contains Cherry MX Red switches.  If you would like a refresher course on what that actually means, check out Scott's animated guide right here

Instead of depending on software Zalman has included programming keys on the keyboard to modify lighting effects and macros; they also added a nice feature to the numlock key, press it twice and it launches the calculator app.  Check out the full details over at Benchmark Reviews.

Zalman-ZM-K700M-Mechanical-Gaming-Keyboard-Top-600x183.jpg

"I'm picky, and have been described as a perfectionist too many times to count. So it stands to reason that the keyboard, that peripheral attachment that works like a natural extensions of the body for the eSports gamer, becomes a personal choice for many. Keyboards are used for both everyday workload as well as entertainment, so picking the right one is important."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Awesome Games Done Quick 2016 Wraps Up

Subject: General Tech | January 12, 2016 - 01:36 PM |
Tagged: pc gaming

The end to the 24-hour, week-long speedrun stream occurred on Sunday morning. Donations are still trickling in, but the current total (when this news was published) is $1.213 million USD. This is almost exactly how much Summer Games Done Quick 2015 raised last July, which raised $1.216 million USD for Doctors Without Borders, but a little shy of last AGDQ's $1.576 million USD.

You may now resume your regularly scheduled Netflix and PC Perspective podcasts...

Games_Done_Quick_logo.PNG

... actually, not quite. Sure, watch our content, but before you watch old Fast & Furious movies (don't judge me) there is a recording that you may want to check out. Very early on Friday the 8th, Graviton did a 100% speedrun of Blast Corps for the AGDQ event. You may have missed it, but this run was also an interview with Martin Wakeley, lead designer of Blast Corps (and Jet Force Gemini). He spent about an hour and three quarters recounting his time at Rare. One interesting story was about a Pacman-style bonus level that had to be modified due to a Namco patent, as Graviton was running it.

If you enjoy listening to developer interviews, this is a good one.

Lithium Ion batteries that won't explode? Sounds like a great idea!

Subject: General Tech | January 12, 2016 - 01:23 PM |
Tagged: lithium ion, battery, badaboom

One problem with Lithium Ion batteries is that they have a slight penchant for failing in a spectacular way when charged improperly or if heat builds up past a critical level.  Some researchers have come up with a simple idea to prevent this from happening, applying a polyethylene film to one of the electrodes which changes size as the temperature changes, breaking the circuit when a certain temperature is reached which shuts the battery down.  Once the temperature falls the circuit reconnects and the battery is usable once again.  They do not expect this to impact the normal functionality of the battery, giving an extra level of safety with no performance cost.  You can follow the links from Slashdot to see the research paper yourself.

Screen-Shot-2016-01-12-at-12.41.20-485x400.png

"Scientists have designed a lithium-ion battery that self-regulates according to temperature, to prevent itself from overheating. Reaching extreme temperatures, the battery is able to shut itself down, only restarting once it has cooled. The researchers designed the battery to shut down and restart itself over a repeated heating and cooling cycle, without compromising performance."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Slashdot

Dell takes a different direction with the Latitude 13 7370

Subject: Mobile | January 11, 2016 - 07:23 PM |
Tagged: dell, latitude 13 7370

The new Dell Latitude 13 7370 seems to share some DNA with old Lenovo designs while still incorporating new features, such as a display that is happy functional when completely flat.  The basic model ships with a 1080p screen, though a touch-enabled 2560x1440 model will also be available soon.  I has only a single USB 3.0 connector, which is made up for by the inclusion of two Type-C 3.1 ports with Thunderbolt 3 compatibility; once peripherals compatible with the new connection arrive you will be quite happy.  Dell has also chosen to use Core M Skylake parts as opposed to the i3's through i7's of previous models so you might not want this to run statistical analysis on but the standard SSD will ensure decent load times.  You can see more about the new Dell over at The Inquirer.

dell-latitude-13-7000-series-hands-on-540x334.jpeg

"PC MAKER Dell updated its Latitude 13 7000 Series at last CES last week, and the Latitude 13 7370 leads the charge in the company's plan to shed the image of business laptops as stuffy, clunky work machines."

Here are some more Mobile articles from around the web:

Mobile

Source: The Inquirer

Report: AMD Carrizo FM2+ Processor Listing Appears Online

Subject: Processors | January 11, 2016 - 06:26 PM |
Tagged: rumor, report, FM2+, carrizo, Athlon X4, amd

According to a report published by CPU World, a pair of unreleased AMD Athlon X4 processors appeared in a supported CPU list on Gigabyte's website (since removed) long enough to give away some information about these new FM2+ models.

Athlon_X4_835_and_845.jpg

Image credit: CPU World

The CPUs in question are the Athlon X4 835 and Athlon X4 845, 65W quad-core parts that are both based on AMD's Excavator core, according to CPU World. The part numbers are AD835XACI43KA and AD845XACI43KA, which the CPU World report interprets:

"The 'I43' letters and digits in the part number signify Socket FM2+, 4 CPU cores, and 1 MB L2 cache per module, or 2MB in total. The last two letters 'KA' confirm that the CPUs are based on Carrizo design."

The report further states that the Athlon X4 835 will operate at 3.1 GHz, with 3.5 GHz for the X4 845. No Turbo Core frequency information is known for these parts.

Source: CPU-World