Microsoft Allows Opt-in to Grandfather Your Free OneDrive

Subject: General Tech | December 12, 2015 - 09:54 PM |
Tagged: microsoft, onedrive

A month and a half ago, Microsoft announced that they would roll back OneDrive storage plans. Subscription OneDrive storage would return to 1TB, down from unlimited. Free OneDrive was hit, too. The service offered 15GB (with a bonus 15GB for using Camera Roll). That was also scheduled to be reduced to 5GB, with no Camera Roll bonus. Users were naturally upset at having their free storage reduced by a factor of 6.

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These changes will still take effect in early 2016, but not for everyone. If you are a current user with 15GB base storage, you can opt-in to being grandfathered by clicking a link. You will apparently also retain your 15GB camera roll bonus, if applicable, too. This will not be available for new customers, although there might be still time to sneak in, especially if you have a Hotmail / Microsoft Account / .NET / Passport / Passport Network / Live ID / Microsoft Account (again) / whatever they call it now account. Wouldn't hurt to check what OneDrive offers you today, and try to lock it in.

The Ars Technica article is a bit ambiguous about current Unlimited users. I mean, I guess it won't hurt to try. Be sure to let us know if you're successful. It sounds like it only applies to free tiers, though.

I guess it's nice that Microsoft allows users to be retain their settings. It's interesting that they require opt-in, though. This satisfies the users who are most likely to object, but it directs future users to subscribe. You know, unless they find old news posts on Google.

Source: Microsoft

Overclocking Locked Intel Skylake CPUs Possible - i3 6100 Benchmarked

Subject: Processors | December 11, 2015 - 02:08 PM |
Tagged: Skylake, overclocking, Intel, Core i3-6100, bios, BCLK, asrock

The days of Intel overclocking being limited to their more expensive unlocked parts appear to be over, as TechSpot has posted benchmarks from an overclocked Intel Core i3-6100 using a new (pre-release) BIOS update from ASRock.

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Image credit: TechSpot

"In overclocking circles it was recently noted that BCLK (base clock) overclocking might become a possibility in Skylake processors. Last night Asrock contacted us with an updated BIOS that enabled this. We jumped at the opportunity and have already tested and benched a Core i3-6100 Skylake CPU with a 1GHz overclock (4.7GHz) on air cooling."

The 1.0 GHz overclock was achieved with a 127 MHz base clock on the i3 processor, with a vcore of ~1.36v. Apparently the ASRock motherboard requires the processor's graphics portion to be disabled for overclocking with this method, and TechSpot used an NVIDIA GTX 960 for test system. The results were impressive, as you might imagine.

The following is a small sampling of the benchmark results available from the sourced TechSpot article:

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Image credit: TechSpot

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Image credit: TechSpot

The overclocked i3-6100 was able to come very close to the multi-threaded performance of the stock AMD FX-8320E (8-core) processor in Cinebench, with double the per-thread performance. Results from their Handbrake encode test were even better, with the overclocked i3-6100 essentially matching the performance of the Core i5-4430 processor tested.

Gaming was underwhelming, with very similar performance from the GTX 960 from all CPUs at the settings tested.

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Image credit: TechSpot

So what did the article say about this new overclocking-friendly BIOS availability? "We are told this updated BIOS for their Z170 motherboards will be available to owners very soon." It will be interesting to see if other vendors offer the same, as there are results out there using a SuperMicro board as well.

Source: TechSpot

LEPA's new EXllusion 240 mixes form and function ... at a cost

Subject: Cases and Cooling | December 11, 2015 - 12:52 PM |
Tagged: lepa, EXllusion 240, AIO, water cooler

Similar to the Raijintek Triton AIO cooler that [H]ard|OCP recently reviewed, the LEPA EXllusion 240 watercooler allows you to open up the loop to add colour to your cooling fluid or even replace it with one of your choice should you so desire.  This AIO uses a 240mm radiator and a pair of 120mm fans and comes with red, green and blue dyes for your coolant, though not the yellow advertised on the box.  The cooler performed decently in their tests, the problem they found with this cooler was the $120 price tag, which is noticeably higher than the competition.  Read the full review for performance details right here.

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"LEPA and its new EXllusion 240 All-In-One CPU cooler touts 400 watts of cooling ability, a patented copper cooling plate, a larger volume of liquid in the block itself, and a "silent" pump, all with a refillable design. Overall it has the look of a quality built AIO, but is the EXllusion worth 120 of your hard earned dollars?"

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Source: [H]ard|OCP

It's getting crowded in the server room already and Qualcomm wants in

Subject: General Tech | December 11, 2015 - 12:16 PM |
Tagged: server, qualcomm

AMD and Intel have been fighting it out in the server room for a while and have had to shift their tactics towards more efficient processors which merely sip at power compared to the first decade of this century.  Coming from the other direction IBM and ARM design teams have been increasing the power of their chips and their ability to work together to match AMD and Intel's performance while still trying to maintain a lead on power efficiency.  Now, according to what DigiTimes has been hearing, Qualcomm is ready to take advantage of its ARM license to officially move into the server market.  Their initial design will sport 24 cores, provide support for VM environments and will be Linux compatible.  Keep an eye on Xilinx and Mellanox Technologies as they were the companies who have announced plans to release products based on Qualcomm's designs.

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"Qualcomm, which announced plans to begin developing ARM-based chips for servers in November 2014, has started delivering server-use CPU samples to potential clients and has also set up a company in Guizhou, China to promote the CPUs exclusively."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: DigiTimes

New Valve Steam Controller Software and Factory Video

Subject: General Tech | December 11, 2015 - 08:37 AM |
Tagged: valve, Steam Controller

Valve updated the Steam Controller software, driven mostly by community feedback, statistics, and direct enhancements from lead users. This update allows users to bind media key inputs to the desktop so that the controller can adjust volume, play, pause, and skip when it is not being used to game. They also added context menus for hotkeys, so they can be accessible from the controller without each action taking up a whole button. It sounds like an analogy for the Q command rose in games like Battlefield, just in your input device drivers (and customizable).

valve-2015-steam-controller-front.jpg

There were two other features that caught my eye. First, controller profiles will soon be sharable for non-Steam games (if you add them to your Steam library). This may or may not be useful for titles from Blizzard or Riot Games. Would sharing profiles really help these games be playable with a controller? Either way, there are certainly some titles that will benefit from this, especially those purchased on GoG. The other addition is “Controller HUD.” Basically, when enabled, it shows the pressed inputs on screen. It sounds like Valve intended this to be a debug mechanism for creating profiles, but it could be very useful for video streamers (especially speedrunners).

Lastly, and this is purely for entertainment value, Valve published a video of their factory. Someone decided that it would be hilarious to stick Aperture Laboratories on various machines. It's pure promotional fluff... but cool fluff.

Source: Valve

Logitech G Announces Arx Control Challenge for Developers

Subject: General Tech | December 10, 2015 - 08:47 PM |
Tagged: software development, logitech g, logitech, developers, contest

Logitech G has announced their Arx Control Challenge, a global contest for game developers to create the best Arx Control app with the chance to win $5,000 in cash and Logitech G gear.

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"Logitech G is looking for next-level innovators — skilled developers with a passion for gaming and creating. We are releasing the ARX Control Software Development Kit so you have the chance to invent on the cutting-edge. Give it your all and you could win cash, gear and acclaim.

The Challenge begins December 9, 2015. Submit your app before February 29, 2016 to put your creation in the running.

THE PRIZE IS YOURS, IF YOU CAN PROVE YOURSELF.

1st Place:

  • $5,000 USD cash prize
  • Professionally produced spotlight video for your app
  • Worldwide exposure on Logitech G’s global social media channels
  • Three full sets of Logitech G gaming gear

2nd and 3rd Place:

  • Worldwide exposure on Logitech G’s global social media channels
  • One full set of Logitech G gear"

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So what exactly is Arx Control?

"Arx Control is a new app from Logitech G that works with Logitech Gaming Software (LGS), giving you access to a wide range of in-game display information on your mobile device, including in-game intelligence, vital system performance statistics and media controls. 

The Logitech® G410 Atlas Spectrum TKL Mechanical Gaming Keyboard and the Logitech® G910 Orion Spark RGB Mechanical Keyboard both feature an adjustable dock that supports most iOS® and Android™ devices, providing easy access to your Arx Control data.

The Arx Control dock can also be pulled out and placed anywhere on your desk for easy viewing. Using Logitech G’s Arx Control SDK, game developers can create customized apps to deliver content special to their games.

Major developers like Valve Software are working with Logitech to take advantage of the ARX Development kit to create advanced integration for their most popular games."

The Arx Control challenge starts now and runs through Feb. 29, 2016. Complete rules and more information is available here.

Source: Logitech G

Wired and wireless together in some sort of Chimera-like mouse

Subject: General Tech | December 10, 2015 - 03:56 PM |
Tagged: IOGear, chimera m2, gaming mouse, wireless mouse, input

Yes, IOGear has merged wired and wireless connectivity into a strange hybrid of gaming mouse, the Chimera M2.  There are even two sensors, an optical for when you are connected via a wire and a low powered IR sensor for when you are not.  You get up to 2000DPI when plugged in and up to 1600 when you are in the so called 'office mode'.  Overclockers Club found the mouse comfortable in their hands and were impressed with the ~$40 price tag.  Check out the full review for more information and a peek at the trick that the charge has as well.

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"I also am not really a fan of wireless mice because I hate when things die on me, as I am too lazy to plug them in. But I have not recharged this mouse in the two weeks I have been using it, and I just went down to one battery light today. The plus is that if I do run low, I can plug directly into the mouse and charge while using it, so no worries there anymore. If I had to pick one quarrel with this mouse, it would not be the mouse itself, but the fact I don’t know what the battery lights are measured at."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

OCZ's Trion 100 and the Crucial BX200; these are not the drives you're looking for

Subject: Storage | December 10, 2015 - 02:30 PM |
Tagged: tlc, crucial, BX200, ocz, Trion 100, ssd

Scott may have moved on but The Tech Report is still going strong and recently posted a double review covering the OCZ Trion 100 and Crucial's BX200.  Al has tested out two of the Trion 100s previously, he was less than impressed with the drives performance and The Tech Report's testing revealed the same lacklustre performance.  Sadly they preferred the Trion to the BX200, though perhaps not for the reason you might expect.  The previous BX100 was an MLC drive which had a great price to performance ratio, it was fast and inexpensive,  which lead to certain expectations for the next iteration of BX SSD.  Sadly the TLC used in the new drive simply could not match the BX100's performance and so neither drive received accolades for there performance.  Check out the actual performance and TR's recommendations in their full review.

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"OCZ and Crucial aren't resting on the laurels of their entry-level Arc 100 and BX100 drives. Instead, they've cooked up even more attainable SSDs built with TLC flash—OCZ with its Trion 100, and Crucial with its BX200. We put these drives through their paces to see what they can do."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Update your AntiVirus software and you won't have to worry

Subject: General Tech | December 10, 2015 - 01:37 PM |
Tagged: security, avg, Kaspersky, mcafee

To reverse the usual order, the good news is that AVG fixed the issue a while ago, as have Intel, owner of McAfee, as well as Kaspersky.  The bad news is that this exploit is rather nasty and was completely avoidable with a bit of forethought.  Of all the programs to follow a predictable pattern, AV software is the last one you would want to see do so.  There is a tool over at github to allow you to check your own vulnerability.  Personal machines should be good to go but as The Register mentions, at least one Enterprise level AV program is vulnerable and those definitions are often updated along a different path that consumer level products. 

Chances are you are safe, but you should probably double check.

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"In March, researchers at security firm enSilo found a serious flaw in popular free antivirus engine AVG Internet Security 2015. They found that the software was allocating memory for read, write, and execute (RWX) permissions in a predictable address that an attacker could use to inject code into a target system."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: The Register

Podcast #378 - Updates from the Radeon Technology Group, a new case from Antec, ASUS Maximus VIII Gene and more!

Subject: Editorial | December 10, 2015 - 01:21 AM |
Tagged: podcast, video, freesync, hdr, displayport 1.3, antec, P380, Maximus VIII Gene, killer networks, corsair, h5 sf, carbide 600

PC Perspective Podcast #378 - 12/10/2015

Join us this week as we discuss updates from the Radeon Technology Group, a new case from Antec, ASUS Maximus VIII Gene and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

  • iTunes - Subscribe to the podcast directly through the iTunes Store
  • RSS - Subscribe through your regular RSS reader
  • MP3 - Direct download link to the MP3 file

Hosts: Josh Walrath, Jeremy Hellstrom, Allyn Malventano, and Sebastian Peak

Subscribe to the PC Perspective YouTube Channel for more videos, reviews and podcasts!!

Humble Bundle for Neo Geo 25th Anniversary

Subject: General Tech | December 9, 2015 - 06:04 PM |
Tagged: snk, pc gaming, humble bundle

The Neo Geo was created by SNK as an arcade and commercial video game system. The hardware made its way into an (expensive) home console in 1990, with almost every arcade game available for it. This was back in an era where new arcade cabinets overshadowed consoles in quality. Granted, the Neo Geo doesn't quite fit in that pigeonhole, especially when you look at games at the end of its product cycle. Its draw, as an arcade cabinet, was its ability to store multiple games simultaneously.

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1990 is now 25 years ago, and Humble Bundle has a huge collection of their titles for the next handful of days. These franchises include Art of Fighting, Fatal Fury, King of Fighters, Metal Slug, Sengoku, and more. They are all PC ports, of course. While some titles haven't been announced yet, most of them are available DRM-free on Windows, Mac, Linux, and Web (Chrome and Firefox). The two (current) exceptions are The King of Fighters '98 Ultimate Match Final Edition and The King of Fighters 2002 Unlimited Match, which are both Windows-only Steam keys.

The bundle lasts until Tuesday, December 22nd at 2pm EST (UTC - 5).

Is there still a market for AIO PCs? The Acer Aspire Z3

Subject: Systems | December 9, 2015 - 01:52 PM |
Tagged: acer, Aspire Z3-710-UR54, AIO

With the rise of SFF systems, Zotac's ZBox series for example, which can be mounted on the back of a display, is there really a market for AIO PCs still?  Acer seems to think so as they have recently released the Z3-710-UR54, a 23.8" 1080p LED screen which houses an i5-4590T, 8GB of DDR3 and a 1TB HDD.  Other models range from i3's to i7's but all have the same type of connectivity, 5.1 sound and a strange lack of touchscreen features.  The system is only 1.4" thick, so it is technically slimmer than a display with a SFF sticking out of the VESA mount on the back but it still seems hard to justify the price.  Check out the full list of features at Hardware Secrets and see if you think this Aspire is worth the cost.

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"The All-in-One (AIO) computer is a great way to put a computer on your desktop without any clutter or big chunky CPU and the Acer Z3 series gives you everything that you need in an AIO."

Here are some more Systems articles from around the web:

Systems

Now that's a Golf game!

Subject: General Tech | December 9, 2015 - 01:17 PM |
Tagged: gaming, no goblin, 100ft robot golf

Developers No Goblin have come up with a golf game that actually looks like a lot of fun to play and if Tiger Woods is in there somewhere he will end up smooshed under the foot of a 100' tall robot.   Instead of taking a pro golfer in funny pants you instead romp through the world as an incredibly destructive giant mech with a penchant for whacking everything around them, up to and including a golf ball.  Is there a skyscraper in the way of your shot?  No worries, wander over and smash it down before hitting the ball.  A competitor getting ahead of you?  Why not handicap them, in a rather literal sense!  Check out the video below or head over to Rock, Paper, SHOTGUN for a link to the game page.

"100ft Robot Golf – there’s a fantastic game name for you. Pretty much everything it is can be deduced from that name. The second game from Roundabout folks No Goblin, it’ll see giant golfbots playing on – and smashing through – courses across cities, mountains, and moons."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Mozilla Abandons Firefox OS Smartphones

Subject: Editorial, Mobile, Shows and Expos | December 9, 2015 - 07:04 AM |
Tagged: yahoo, mozilla, google, Firefox OS, Android

Author's Disclosure: I volunteer for Mozilla, unpaid. I've been to one of their events in 2013, but otherwise have no financial ties with them. They actually weren't aware that I was a journalist. Still, our readers should know my background when reading my editorial.

Mozilla has announced that, while Firefox OS will still be developed for “many connected devices,” the organization will stop developing and selling smartphones through carriers. Mozilla claims that the reason is because they “weren't able to offer the best user experience possible.” While the statement is generic enough to apply in a lot of contexts, I'm not sure how close to the center of that region it is.

This all occurred at the “Mozlando” conference in Florida.

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Firefox OS was born when stakeholders asked Mozilla to get involved in the iOS and Android duopoly. Unlike Windows, Blackberry, and other competitors, Mozilla has a history of leveraging Web standards to topple industry giants. Rather than trying to fight the industry leaders with a better platform, and hoping that developers create enough apps to draw users over, they expanded what Web could do to dig the ground out of their competitors.

This makes sense. Mobile apps were still in their infancy themselves, so Firefox OS wouldn't need to defeat decades of lock-in or orders of magnitude performance deltas. JavaScript is getting quite fast anyway, especially when transpiled from an unmanaged language like C, so apps could exist to show developers that the phones are just as capable as their competitors.

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The issue is that being able to achieve high performance is different from actually achieving it. The Web, as a platform, is getting panned as slow and “memory hungry” (even though free memory doesn't make a system faster -- it's all about the overhead required to manage it). Likewise, the first few phones landed at the low end, due in part to Mozilla, the non-profit organization remember, wanting to use Firefox OS to bring computing to new areas of the world. A few hiccups here and there added another coat of paint to the Web's perception of low performance.

Granted, they couldn't compete on the high end without a successful app ecosystem if they tried. Only the most hardcore of fans would purchase a several-hundred dollar smartphone, and intend to put up with just Web apps. Likewise, when I've told people that phones run on the Web, they didn't realize we mean “primarily localhost” until it's explicitly stated. People are afraid for their data caps, even though offline experiences are actually offline and stored locally.

The Dinosaur in the Room

Then there's the last question that I have. I am a bit concerned about the organization as a whole. They seem to be trying to shed several products lately, and narrow their focus. Granted, all of these announcements occur because of the event, so there's plenty of room for coincidence. They have announced that they will drop ad tiles, which I've heard praised.

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The problem is, why would they do that? Was it for good will, aligning with their non-profit values? (Update: Fixed double-negative typo) Or was it bringing in much less money than projected? If it's the latter, then how far do they need to shrink their influence, and how? Did they already over-extend, and will they need to compensate for that? Looking at their other decisions, they've downsized Firefox OS, they are thinking about spinning out Thunderbird again, and they have quietly shuttered several internal projects, like their division for skunkworks projects, called “Mozilla Labs.” Mozilla also has a division called "Mozilla Research," although that is going strong. They are continually hiring for projects like "Servo," a potential new browser engine, and "Rust," a programming language that is used for Servo and other projects.

While Mozilla is definitely stable enough, financially, to thrive in their core products, I'm concerned about how much they can do beyond that. I'm genuinely concerned that Mozilla is trying to restructure while looking like a warrior for both human rights and platforms of free expression. We will not see the books until a few months from now, so we can only speculate until then. The organization is pulling inward, though. I don't know how much of this is refocusing on the problems they can solve, or the problems they can afford. We will see.

Source: Techcrunch

The other Android, a look at the OnePlus 2

Subject: Mobile | December 8, 2015 - 06:05 PM |
Tagged: USB 3 Type-C, OxygenOS, oneplus 2, Android

OnePlus is not likely the first source you would think of when purchasing an Android phone but perhaps this review over at Techgage might just change that.  As you can see below the phones are rather attractive and OxygenOS is an interesting flavour of Lollipop 5.1.1.  The charge cable is also an interesting feature, it is USB Type-C, however the cable it ships with is specific to this phone and you should not be charging other USB devices with it as it is out of spec.  While there are advantages to a custom USB cable, there is also some danger associated with it so make sure to keep it separate from your other cables if you intend on picking this phone up.

The hardware includes an 8-core 1.8GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 810 and Adreno 430 GPU powering a 5.5" 1080p IPS screen.  Depending on the model you choose you will either have 16GB local storage and 3GB of DDR4 or 64GB and 4GB.  Techgage liked the phone a lot, with a few caveats; check them out in the full review.

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"When a smartphone vendor comes along and offers its latest option as a “flagship killer”, it doesn’t exactly leave much room for leeway: it’s either going to be accurate, or off the mark. On paper, the OnePlus 2’s case seems to be solid, so let’s take a hard look at it and see if its promises are lived up to."

Here are some more Mobile articles from around the web:

Mobile

Source: Techgage

Corsair Introduces Carbide 600 Series Inverted ATX Enclosures

Subject: Cases and Cooling | December 8, 2015 - 05:00 PM |
Tagged: silent case, quiet computing, inverted motherboard, corsair, Carbide 600Q, Carbide 600C, atx case

Corsair has announced a new model in their Carbide lineup with the 600Q and 600C enclusures, both of which feature an inverted motherboard design - a first from Corsair.

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The Corsair Carbide 600C

The two models share the same basic design, though the 600Q is optimized for silence with sound-deadening material (and a solid side panel), while the 600C offers a very large side-panel window for more style when silence is at less of a premium. Both versions use Corsair's AF140L 140 mm fans for cooling, which are connected to an external 3-speed fan controller to easily adjust based on cooling/noise needs.

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The Corsair Carbide 600Q top I/O and fan controller

"Unlike many PC cases which demand enthusiasts choose between noisy, high-airflow ventilation or low-noise, restricted airflow designs, the 600Q and 600C are able to deliver the best of both. The distinctive inverted-ATX internal design places the heat producing components in the direct airflow pathway of the two AF140L 140mm intake fans and single AF140L 140mm exhaust fan, providing powerful and efficient cooling, with extra wide vents ensuring unimpeded airflow.

Specially tuned for low-noise operation, the 600Q and 600C’s three included fans have been redesigned for excellent airflow at lower noise levels, with an integrated external 3-speed fan controller allowing users to reduce the fan RPM, further lowering noise with a minimal impact on cooling performance. The result is a no-compromise approach to cooling that delivers fantastic system temperatures at extremely low noise levels.

The 600Q dedication to low-noise continues well beyond fan speeds. High density sound deadening material fitted in the front panel, side panels, and roof works to further mute system noise and ensure that the 600Q is as quiet as it is beautiful."

The Carbide 600 enclosures have an unobtrusive steel constuction, and the hinged front panel opens to reveal a pair of 5.25" optical drive bays. The interior features includes a PSU/drive bay cover to help keep things looking clean (especially for the windowed 600C version), and support for up to a 280 mm liquid cooler up front, and up to 360 mm on the bottom.

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The Carbide 600C with hinged door open

Here are some of the specs and features from Corsair:

  • Inverse-ATX Layout: With this new layout, airflow is easily directed at the hottest devices in your system; the GPU and CPU, and not wasted on drive cages.
  • Sound Damping Throughout (600Q only): Keep your system quiet and cool with high-density sound damping material on side panels, front panel, and top panels.  It’s so quiet, you’ll find yourself wondering if your PC is even powered on.
  • Hinged and Latched Full Side Panel Window (600C only): Easily access your components with a single touch – and when closed, enjoy viewing every part of your build through the full size side panel window.
  • Steel Exterior: Get rid of those plastic cases – the 600Q and 600C have full steel exterior panels for extra durability and gorgeous good looks.
  • Three Included AF140L fans: Great airflow doesn’t have to be noisy – the three AF140L fans can push large amounts of air across your hottest devices without that annoying fan hum, and the three-speed fan controller lets you decide exactly how fast they run.
  • PSU and 5.25” Bay Cover: Clean up the inside of your case by tucking all those cables and less-attractive drives behind a clean, refined PSU and 5.25” bay cover. Or remove them for assembly – it’s up to you.
  • Watercooling Ready: Fit up to a 280mm radiator up front and up to a 360mm radiator on the bottom – along with a 140mm rear fan mount.
  • Easy to Clean: Easily access dust filters on front and bottom meaning you’ll never spend more than a minute getting dust out of your system.
  • Easy to Build: Tool-free drive installation, tool-free side panel access, and tons of cable routing options and tie downs means you can spend less time building your PC and more time using it.

The Carbide 600Q and 600C will be available in this month, and both models carry an MSRP of $149.99.

Source: Corsair

What is this, a GPU for Seattle fans? The MSI GTX 980 Ti SEA HAWK

Subject: Graphics Cards | December 8, 2015 - 03:56 PM |
Tagged: msi, GTX 980 Ti SEA HAWK, 980 Ti, 4k

[H]ard|OCP recently wrapped up a review of the MSI GTX 980 Ti SEA HAWK and are now revisiting the GPU, focusing on the performance at 4K resolutions.  The particular card that they have tops out at 1340MHz base and a 1441MHz boost clock which results in an in-game frequency of 1567MHz.  For comparison testing they have tested their overclocked card against the SEA HAWK at the factory overclock and a regular 980 Ti at 4k resolution.  Read on to see if this watercooled 980 Ti is worth the premium price in the full review.

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"Our second installment with the MSI GTX 980 Ti SEA HAWK focuses in on gameplay at 4K and how viable it is with the fastest overclocked GTX 980 Ti we have seen yet. We will be using a reference GeForce GTX 980 Ti to show the full spectrum of the 980 Ti’s performance capabilities and emphasize the MSI GTX 980 Ti SEA HAWK’s value."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Sure ... it's the filesharing that takes up all the bandwidth

Subject: General Tech | December 8, 2015 - 12:43 PM |
Tagged: bandwidth, streaming, fud

The next time you hear someone harping about how the tubes are clogged with filesharing, either legal or illegal, as the reason why your internet is slow or dropping out you should reference this chart.  According to Sandvine, who would tend to know this sort of thing, just over 65% of all traffic is media streaming.  Chances are that the vast majority of that traffic is legal, coming from Netflix, YouTube, Spotify and the wide variety of other online content providers.  Indeed, chances are you pay to use that service so when your connection degrades and you contact your ISP about it make sure to have this handy as a reference. 

If those companies want to charge you for a service they should actually provide it and not try to blame their lack of infrastructure or insight on something else.  Unfortunately they will probably ignore the data and the only result of knowing this will be a sharp increase in your blood pressure.  Still, knowing is half the battle so head to re/code for a look at the charts they have compiled into this article.

sandvine-year-end-2015.png

"Here’s the latest breakdown from broadband services company Sandvine of “fixed access” — for the purposes of this piece, read it as “home broadband” — Internet usage during peak evening hours. That big red bar in the middle is the one to focus on."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: re/code

These 3 Systems Will Leave You Shocked...

Subject: General Tech | December 8, 2015 - 08:41 AM |
Tagged: system shock, pc gaming, otherside entertainment, night dive studios

Otherside Entertainment is a relatively new game studio, founded in 2014, that is working on a crowdfunded fantasy RPG called Underworld Ascendant. Apparently, they are also working on System Shock 3.

otherside-2015-system-shock-3.png

Well, at least a teaser page says the words “System Shock 3” and has a copyright notice from Otherside Entertainment. I believe that it is fairly reasonable to jump to the aforementioned conclusion with the provided information. The rights to Systen Shock are currently in the hands of Night Dive Studios, which has been reviving old (~90s-era) PC games. They are also in the news for a few screenshots of the upcoming Turok and Turok 2 remaster.

One of the most interesting parts about all of this is that Otherside Entertainment was founded by the founder of Blue Sky Productions, later renamed Looking Glass Studios, who co-developed System Shock 2 with Irrational Games. More Looking Glass alumni than just the founder are at Otherside too, but I don't know how many were from that era and team.

AMD HSA Patches Hoping for GCC 6

Subject: Graphics Cards, Processors | December 8, 2015 - 08:07 AM |
Tagged: hsa, GCC, amd

Phoronix, the Linux-focused hardware website, highlighted patches for the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) that implement HSA. This will allow newer APUs, such as AMD's Carrizo, to accelerate chunks of code (mostly loops) that have been tagged with a precompiler flag as valuable to be done on the GPU. While I have done some GPGPU development, many of the low-level specifics of HSA aren't areas that I have too much experience with.

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The patches have been managed by Martin Jambor of SUSE Labs. You can see a slideshow presentation of their work on the GNU website. Even though features froze about a month ago, they are apparently hoping that this will make it into the official GCC 6 release. If so, many developers around the world will be able to target HSA-compatible hardware in the first half of 2016. Technically, anyone can do so regardless, but they would need to specifically use the unofficial branch on the GCC Subversion repository. This probably means compiling it themselves, and it might even be behind on a few features in other branches that were accepted into GCC 6.

Source: Phoronix