Your Cat6 cabling not behaving as you would expect? Turns out that is not a Fluke

Subject: General Tech | February 1, 2016 - 04:49 PM |
Tagged: fluke, fail, cat6

The difference between Cat5(e) and Cat 6 will not be obvious for home users but is certainly noticeable in large business deployments.  Cat5 and 5e are capable of providing 100MHz whereas Cat6 is rated to 250MHz, assuming it is installed to specifications.  In addition to the increased frequency, Cat6 is has much greater protection against crosstalk and system noise which is far more important to many sysadmins. 

Previously we benefited from the honour system in place, many Cat 5 cables actually met the Cat 5e specification but it seems that this is not the case with Cat 6.  Hack a Day has heard word through a cable provider that Fluke noticed that 80% of the Cat 6 tested with their equipment does not meet specification, in many cases it does not even meet Cat 5e specs.  Since a Fluke line tester capable of analyzing network cabling to this degree of accuracy costs north of $10,000 not all companies are going to have their networks fully tested for compliance.  This may be why you are seeing odd behaviour on your network.

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"So they did some research and purchased a Fluke certification tester for a measly 12,000 US dollars. While they were purchasing the device, they ran across an interesting tidbit in the fluke knowledge base. Fluke said that 80% of the consumer Cat 6 cables they tested didn’t begin to meet the Cat 6 specification."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Hack a Day

G.Skill Rolls Out Refreshed Mechanical Gaming Keyboards

Subject: General Tech | February 1, 2016 - 12:48 AM |
Tagged: ripjaws, RGB LED, mechanical keyboard, G.Skill, Cherry MX

Memory maker G.Skill recently announced a refresh of its mechanical keyboard line that tweaks the KM780 series and cuts $10 off of the MSRP pricing. The two new refreshed products are the Ripjaws KM780R RGB and KM780R MX.

GSkill KM780R-MX front.png

The new keyboards use an aluminum plate/base, Cherry MX switches, and a black anodized finish on the frame. The KM780R MX is backlit by red LEDs while the KM780R RGB can have custom per-key backlighting. Both feature a full QWERTY layout plus number pad as well as media playback keys, a LED volume level display, and six macro keys (three on-board key profiles). There is also USB and analog audio pass-through ports.

G.Skill is offering the new gaming keyboards in several models depending on your choice of key switch. Specifically, users can choose from Cherry MX blue, brown, or red switches. Connecting via USB, they employ anti-ghosting and full N-key rollover tech as well.

GSkill KM780R-RGB.png

The every so slightly cheaper KM780R series does away with its predecessors bundled extra gaming key caps and key removal tool. The KM780R MX has an MSRP of $120 while the KM780R RGB model has an MSRP of $159.99 (Note that the brown and red variants are actually $140 on Amazon right now, but the Cherry MX blue version is not on sale.)

While I have not used them, the original models from last year appear to have garnered quite a bit of praise in reviews (particularly from AnandTech). It seems like G.Skill has not changed much and the R variants are more of the same for a bit less, and that's probably a good thing. I'm looking forward to seeing full reviews though, of course.

Have you tried the memory giant's other products before?

Also read: Mechanical Keyboard Switches Explained and Compared by Scott Michaud @ PC Perspective

Source: G.Skill

Corsair Launches Faster Vengeance LPX DDR4 Memory Kits

Subject: Memory | January 31, 2016 - 10:00 PM |
Tagged: Vengeance LPX, ddr4, corsair

Earlier this month Corsair released new DDR4 memory kits under its Vengeance LPX brand. The kits come in 32 GB, 64 GB, and 128 GB capacities and come bundled with a 40mm "Vengeance Airflow" RAM cooler.

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At the top end, the 128 GB kit comes with eight 16 GB modules clocked at 3,000 MHz and with CAS latencies of 16-18-18-36. At stock speeds it is running at 1.35 volts. Stepping down to the lower capacities gets you faster DIMMs. Corsair has the 64 GB (4 x 16 GB) kit clocked at 3,333 MHz and runs at the same voltage and CAS latencies. The 64 GB kit does come with either black or red heat spreaders as well. Lastly, the 4 x 8 GB (32 GB) Vengeance LPX kit runs off of the same 1.35 volts but is clocked at 3,600 MHz (16-19-19-39 rated latencies). It also comes in black and red SKUs.

The memory kits are available now and are currently priced a bit below their MSRPs at Newegg. The 32 GB kit is $340 and the 64 GB kit is $526. Finally, the 3,000 MHz 128 GB kit will set you back $982. These prices seem more competitive than the last time I looked at DDR4, and there certainly does seem tot be some room for overclocking (especially on that 128 GB kit) so long as the motherboard can handle it!

Source: Corsair

Java Browser Plug-in Soon Killed Off by Oracle

Subject: General Tech | January 30, 2016 - 07:05 PM |
Tagged: web browser, web, shockwave flash, shockwave director, oracle, Java

After decades of semi-ubiquitous usage, Oracle has announced plans to stop providing the Java plug-in for web browsers. It will still be available in the upcoming Java 9 platform, but classified as a deprecated feature.

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This has nothing to do with JavaScript, which is a scripting language that web browsers use. JavaScript is not a plug-in, and it's very secure in terms of the machine the browsers run on. Pretty much all exploits that we see either trick the user to download and run a program, have them disclose sensitive information (passwords, identity, etc.) to the wrong people, try to make the browser impossible to use until it is shut down and restarted, or launch a plug-in that is the actual problem. The joke is “Java is to JavaScript as Car is to Carpet” -- but that's not true: cars often have carpets.

Java, Shockwave Director, and Shockwave Flash filled in a huge gap in Web standards during the late 90s and early 2000s. Plug-ins were about the only way to access files, per-pixel 2D animation functions, and even access to 3D graphics hardware. Web browsers can do almost all of that now, albeit file input and output is limited to individual files, because you don't want every website to be able to read and write files (and site-specific data lockers with APIs like IndexedDB and Web Storage) on the user's hard drive without the user's explicit control.

As such, browsers are trying to kill off native plug-ins. This could be a problem for games like Battlefield 3 and 4, which (Update Jan 30th @ 7:51pm: Used to... it's apparently been a while. Thanks wileecyte in the comments.) require plug-ins to launch the native application, but the browser vendors have been expressing their desires for quite some time. Even companies that are heavily invested in plug-ins for their products, like Oracle, are finally giving up.

Source: Ars Technica

So That's Where Jim Keller Went To... Tesla Motors...

Subject: General Tech, Processors, Mobile | January 29, 2016 - 05:28 PM |
Tagged: tesla, tesla motors, amd, Jim Keller, apple

Jim Keller, a huge name in the semiconductor industry for his work at AMD and Apple, recently left AMD before the launch of the Zen architecture. This made us nervous, because when a big name leaves a company before a product launch, it could either be that their work is complete... or they're evacuating before a stink-bomb detonates and the whole room smells like rotten eggs.

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It turns out a third option is possible: Elon Musk offers you a job making autonomous vehicles. Jim Keller's job title at Tesla will be Vice President of Autopilot Hardware Engineering. I could see this position being enticing, to say the least, even if you are confident in your previous employer's upcoming product stack. It doesn't mean that AMD's Zen architecture will be either good or bad, but it nullifies the earlier predictions, when Jim Keller left AMD, at least until further notice.

We don't know who approached who, or when.

Another point of note: Tesla Motors currently uses NVIDIA Tegra SoCs in their cars, who are (obviously) competitors of Jim Keller's former employer, AMD. It sounds like Jim Keller is moving into a somewhat different role than he had at AMD and Apple, but it could be interesting if Tesla starts taking chip design in-house, to customize the chip to their specific needs, and take away responsibilities from NVIDIA.

The first time he was at AMD, he was the lead architecture of the Athlon 64 processor, and he co-authored x86-64. When he worked at Apple, he helped design the Apple A4 and A5 processors, which were the first two that Apple created in-house; the first three iPhone processors were Samsung SoCs.

PNY updates its XLR8 lineup with the CS2211 SSD

Subject: Storage | January 29, 2016 - 04:49 PM |
Tagged: pny, CS2211, CS1311, tlc, mlc, phison, xlr8

Over at the SSD Review you can check out PNY's newest SSDs, the TLC based CS1311 and the faster MLC based CS2211 which offers ECC RAM and extra data security features as well as a copy of Acronis.  Inside the CS2211 which is the drive featured in this review, you will find an 8-channel Phison PS3110-S10-X controller and 15nm Toshiba MLC, the cache is DDR3L-800, 256MB on the 240GB model and 512MB on the 480GB.  This replaces PNY's original Silicon Motion powered XLR8 and it improves upon performance as well as offering a 4 year warranty. Check out all the benchmarks right here.

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"Just last week we announced PNY's latest SSD products for the new year, the CS1311 and CS2211. It just so happens that today we have some in our hands for review."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

 

Sharing is good ... until it starts eating your bandwidth

Subject: General Tech | January 29, 2016 - 02:32 PM |
Tagged: security, isp, wifi

ISPs have stumbled onto a new money making venture, renting out your wireless internet connection to third parties so that those companies can provide public WiFi to their customers.  Sources told The Inquirer that some ISPs already do this without informing their customers and that it will likely be a common industry practice by 2017.  Theoretically you are allowed to opt out but since your ISP may not have told their users they are doing this; how would the average customer know to request this be turned off?

This raises several concerns, especially here in North America thanks to our pathetic internet services.  Most users have a data cap and the ISPs have little reason to spend resources to properly monitor who is using the bandwidth, their customers or random passersby.  As well the speeds of most customers are low enough that they may see degradation of their service if numerous passersby connect to their WiFi.  Putting the monetary concerns to the side there are also serious security concerns.  Once a user has access to your WiFi router they are most of the way into your network and services such as UPnP and unprotected ports leave you vulnerable to attack.

Change the password your provider put on the router and consider reaching out to them to find out if you have been unwillingly sharing your bandwidth already, or if you might be doing so in the near future.

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"Companies are going to be selling a lot more public Wi-Fi plans over the next few years and it's going to be home Wi-Fi users who'll be the backbone of the network, according to analysts from Juniper Research."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Register

Gigabyte adds full GIMPS and Prime95 compatibility to Skylake processors

Subject: Motherboards | January 28, 2016 - 05:55 PM |
Tagged: update, Skylake, gigabyte, bug

Gigabyte has released UEFI updates today which will resolve the freezing issues on Skylake seen in certain circumstances of Prime95 and GIMPS processing.  Just head over to their download site and enter in your motherboards model and download the new UEFI, or BIOS if you prefer the old terminology.

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As a bonus you may receive the ability to use higher clocked RAM, see any stability issues fixed or better performance from integrated components such as LAN or SATA.  Their update process is easy with none of the stress that once accompanied updates via floppy disjs or masks and UV light.  We can neither confirm nor deny these updates will also resolve unwanted ear hair growth.

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Source: Gigabyte

Gigabyte's talented entry level LGA 1151, the Z170X-UD5

Subject: Motherboards | January 28, 2016 - 03:41 PM |
Tagged: gigabyte, Z170X-UD5, LGA 1151

What is special about the Z170X-UD5 that would make you pick it over other boards?  A $190 price tag is impressive for a Z170, the design is very clean and would look great in a windowed case, USB 3.1 including a Type-C connection, a pair of M.2 slots along with eight SATA and three SEx ports and it even supports three way GPU setups.  Not a bad list of features, though it is missing the Thunderbolt support of its more expensive sibling.  [H]ard|OCP found it easy to overclock using either EZ-Tune or doing it manually and the watchdog system was great when things did not work out so well.  Check out the full review to learn more about this board that matches up affordability with a nice list of features.

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"GIGABYTE’s mid-range Z170X-UD5 has some impressive specifications, a lengthy feature set, and comes in with a sub-$200 street price. This motherboard has all the ingredients for a spectacular enthusiast option on paper. But how does it do in the real world when you put it to the test? It actually does very well."

Here are some more Motherboard articles from around the web:

Motherboards

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Looks like we've got a rat, the browser formerly known as IE is spilling the beans

Subject: General Tech | January 28, 2016 - 02:25 PM |
Tagged: Privacy, microsoft, edge

Microsoft is revisiting an old issue with private browsing which we have seen too many times unfortunately.  In 2010 Firefox's private browsing broke and left site visits on your computer and in 2013 Chrome went through the same issue.  More recently it was discovered that when Chrome interacted with an NVIDIA GPU, sites could also be retrieved.  Now it is Edge's turn, the browser stores your page visits in tables under <user>\appdata\local\microsoft\windows\history even when using InPrivate Mode.  This will be resolved soon but for now if you are secretly ... ah, shopping for a loved one you might want to use a different browser, VPN or other measure.  There is more info over at The Inquirer

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"BURGEONING ORWELLIAN nightmare corporation Microsoft has once again been found lacking in the security department, this time for the new and improved Edge browser in Windows 10."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer

Podcast #384 - Corsair Carbide 600Q, GDDR5X, a Dual Fiji Graphics card and more!

Subject: General Tech | January 28, 2016 - 01:38 PM |
Tagged: podcast, video, corsair, carbide, 600q, 600c, gddr5x, jdec, amd, Fiji, fury x, fury x2, scythe, Ninja 4, logitech, g502 spectrum, Intel, Tigerlake, nzxt, Manta

PC Perspective Podcast #384 - 01/28/2016

Join us this week as we discuss the Corsair Carbide 600Q, GDDR5X, a Dual Fiji Graphics card and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, and Allyn Malventano

Subscribe to the PC Perspective YouTube Channel for more videos, reviews and podcasts!!

Landlocked Homeworld; a glimpse at Kharak

Subject: General Tech | January 27, 2016 - 01:47 PM |
Tagged: gaming, Homeworld, Deserts of Kharak

The newest Homeworld game is a prequel covering how the fractious clans of Kharak fought over an ancient relic found in the deserts of their dying world, presumably the Mothership of the two previous Homeworld games.  From the trailers and descriptions provided in this Rock, Paper, SHOTGUN article the game will play very similarly to Homeworld, most of your assets will be restricted to hugging the ground but their is evidence of vertical terrain, flying units and perhaps even orbital units.  In exchange for that your carrier, the replacement Mothership in this game, it is mobile and heavily armed and so will play a big role in your strategy.  Read on to learn more about the game right here.

kharak3.jpg

"Homeworld: Deserts of Kharak [official site] is a prequel to the legendary Homeworld space real-time strategy games, but this time – heresy! – set on land, as the Kushan race battle angry clans to reclaim ancient technologies found on the sandy planet they currently call home."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Gaming

PCPer Racing Livestream! Thurs. Jan. 28th at 5:30 ET!

Subject: Editorial | January 27, 2016 - 01:27 PM |
Tagged: Thrustmaster, T150, Rocket League, racing wheel, racing, project cars, livestream, GRID Autosport, gaming, force feedback, DiRT Rally, Assetto Corsa

Did you miss the live stream for yesterday racing action? No worries, catch up on the replay right here!

On Thursday, January 28th at 5:30 PM ET we will be hosting a livestream featuing some racing by several of our writers.  We welcome our readers to join up and race with us!  None of us are professionals, so there is a very good chance that anyone that joins can easily outrace us!

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We have teamed up with Thrustmaster to give away the TM T150 Racing Wheel!  The MSRP on this number is $199.99, but we are giving it away for free.  This was reviewed a few months ago and the results were very good for the price point.  You can read that entire review here!

We will be playing multiple games throughout the livestream, so get those Steam clients fired up and updated.

DiRT Rally

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We will be racing through the Rallycross portion of DR.  These are fun races and fairly quick.  Don't forget the Joker lap!

 

Project CARS

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This is another favorite and features a ton of tracks and cars with some interesting tire (tyre) physics thrown in for good measure!

 

Assetto Corsa

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Another fan favorite with lovely graphics and handling/physics that match the best games out there.

 

We will be announcing how to join up in the contest during the livestream!  Be sure to tune in!

Ever been so sick of a song you considered veering off the road to make it stop?

Subject: General Tech | January 27, 2016 - 01:24 PM |
Tagged: Usenix Enigma, security, iot

The good news is that this particular bug has been addressed but it does not make the vulnerability any less terrifying.  A mere 18 seconds of playtime on a compromised audio CD in your car is enough to insert the attack code and gain complete control over your cars computer controlled systems.  This particular vulnerability was discovered in 2010, long before the more recent vulnerabilities you would have seen all over various media.  You could shut off the engines, forcibly unlock the doors, interfere with steering and many other functions that could well cause serious damage at highway speeds or in other scenarios. 

When placing the blame, The Inquirer makes sure to point out that you should not look to the car companies as it is the software providers who are the source of the problem.  Thanks to various corporate policies no car company has access to all of the source code running in their products so a security audit will not help.  Even better is the inclusion of a government-mandated OBD-II port which allows complete control over your cars system; which you should not touch as simply plugging into it would be a crime in the USA.  There is some good news, this vulnerability resulted in Fiat Chrysler recalling 1.4 million cars at a cost of about a quarter of a billion dollars ... an expensive mistake that may convince them to change their software implementation processes.

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"The modern car's operating system is such a mess that researchers were once able to get complete control of a vehicle by playing a song laced with malicious code. Malware encoded in the track was executed after the file was loaded from a CD and processed by a buggy parser."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: The Register

NZXT Introduces the Manta Mini-ITX Enclosure

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 26, 2016 - 10:00 PM |
Tagged: small form factor, SFF, nzxt, mini-itx, Manta, enclosure, curved steel, case

NZXT has announced their newest enclosure, a mini-ITX design with curved steel panels called Manta.

manta_side.jpg

This design looks quite round from the outside, and those added curves provide a lot of additional room for different cooling options in what is a very large case for mini-ITX. In fact, the Manta is actually bigger in overall volume than their Source S340, an ATX design! (The Source S340 is 7.87 x 17.52 x 17.01 inches, while this Manta is 9.65 x 16.77 x 17.72 inches.) So how did NZXT allocate all of that internal space?

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The Manta offers a lot of room for fans and radiators.

Here's a look at the specs from NZXT:

  • Motherboard Support: mini-ITX
  • Expansion Slots: 2
  • Power Supply Support: ATX
  • Cooling System:
    • Front: 2x 140/120mm (2 x 120mm included) 
    • Top: 2x 140/120mm 
    • Rear: 1x 120mm (Included)
  • Radiator Support:
    • Front: Up to 280mm 
    • Top: Up to 280mm 
    • Rear: 120mm
  • Drive Bays
    • Internal 3.5”: 2 
    • Internal 2.5”: 3
  • Clearance:
    • CPU Clearance: 160mm
    • GPU Clearance: 363mm
    • PSU Length: 363mm
  • I/O Panel: LED On/Off, Audio/Mic, USB 3.0
  • Dimensions (WxHxD): 245 x 426 x 450 mm (9.65 x 16.77 x 17.72 inches)
  • Weight: 7.2 kg (15.87 lbs)

manta_front.jpg

Front view of the Manta enclosure

The Manta Mini-ITX case is up for pre-order now with a retail of $139.99, with availability estimated for February.

Source: NZXT

Not the USB thumb drive of the 00's; Kingston's HyperX Savage 128GB USB drive

Subject: Storage | January 26, 2016 - 04:41 PM |
Tagged: kingston, HyperX Savage, 128GB USB drive, usb 3.1

Once USB drives were everywhere, they weren't particularly fast nor large but they were more portable that HDDs and much more durable.  With the arrival of SSDs, flash storage moved from slower thumb drives to SATA which has now become the bottleneck for speed as the drives themselves can actually exceed the transfer capabilities of SATA.  That leaves the USB drive out in the cold, with prices matching or even exceeding lower end SSDs and a form factor only slightly more portable than an SSD in an enclosure.

Kingston's Digital HyperX Savage 128GB USB drive is $86 and Kitguru saw sequential reads topping 400MB/s and writes around 200MB/s which comes close to the limits of the USB 3 connection it uses.  The question is, does the smaller size and admittedly attractive packaging draw you to choose this over a low cost SSD and enclosure?

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"Kingston has earned a reputation with its HyperX brand over the last few years. Today, we are taking a look at the HyperX Savage 128GB USB drive, which supports first-generation USB 3.1 technology and promises ‘blazing fast’ read and write speeds. How does it hold up? Let’s find out!"

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage
MyDigitalSSD BP5e Bullet Proof 5 Eco 240GB SSD @ eTeknix

Source: Kitguru

Cooler Master's MasterAir Maker 8; big cooler, big price

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 26, 2016 - 01:16 PM |
Tagged: cooler master, masterair maker 8, air cooler

At 758g and standing 135x145x172mm (5.3x5.7x6.8") with the fan installed the MasterAir Maker 8 is not the largest heatsink on the market but it is certainly a solid hunk of metal.  Cooler Master has included a black plastic x-brace with captive screws similar to the mount shipped with the Hyper D92 which will help protect your CPU from cracking, a nice touch for those who choose to invest in this cooler.  The price is steep compared to the competition, at $130 it is priced more like an AIO watercooler than an air cooler so the performance needs to be equally as impressive.  The Tech Report tested it on an i5-6600K against the Nepton 240M and the cooling performance was similar, however the acoustical performance was not.  Read on to learn more about the noises this cooler produced and if it is really worth the price tag.

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"Cooler Master's MasterAir Maker 8 CPU cooler uses a unique base design to pack in more heat pipes than any other cooler we know of in its size class. We put this cooler through our testing gauntlet to see whether more is better."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

New, from the company that brought you SuperFish ...

Subject: General Tech | January 26, 2016 - 12:13 PM |
Tagged: security, Lenovo, idiots

Lenovo chose the third most popular password of 2015 to secure its ShareIT for Windows application and for bonus points have made it hard coded, which there is utterly no excuse for in this day and age.  If you aren't familiar with the software, it is another Dropbox type app which allows you to share files and folders, apparently with anyone now that this password ridiculousness has been exposed.  As you read on at The Inquirer the story gets even better, files are transferred in the clear without any encryption and it even creates an open WiFi hotspot for you, to make sharing your files even easier for all and sundry.  There are more than enough unintentional vulnerabilities in software and hardware, we really don't need companies programming them in on purpose.  If you have ShareIT, you should probably DumpIT.

***Update***

We received word that there is an updated version of ShareIT available for those who do use the app and would like to continue to do so.

They can also access the latest versions which are posted and available for download on the Lenovo site. The updated Android version of SHAREit is also available for download on the Google Play store. Please visit the Lenovo security advisory page for the latest information and updates: (https://support.lenovo.com/us/en/product_security/len_4058)

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"HOLY COW! Lenovo may have lost its mind. The firm has created vulnerabilities in ShareIT that could be exploited by anyone who can guess that '12345678' could be a password."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer

The ~$220 showdown, XFX R9 380 DD Black Edition OC 4GB versus the GTX 960

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 25, 2016 - 03:19 PM |
Tagged: XFX R9 380 Double Dissipation Black Edition OC 4GB, xfx, gtx 960

In one corner is the XFX R9 380 DD Black Edition OC 4GB, at factory settings and with an overclock of 1170MHz core and 6.4GHz memory and in the other corner is a GTX 960 with a 1178MHz Boost clock and 7GHz memory.  These two contenders will compete in a six round 1080p match featuring Fallout 4, Project Cars, Witcher 3, GTAV, Dying Light and BF4 to see which is worthy of your hard earned buckaroos.  Your referee for today will be [H]ard|OCP, tune in to see the final results.

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"Today we evaluate a custom R9 380 from XFX, the XFX R9 380 DD BLACK EDITION OC 4GB. Sporting a hefty factory overclock and the Ghost Thermal 3.0 custom cooling with Double Dissipation, we compare it to an equally priced reference GeForce GTX 960. Find out which video card provides the better bargain."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

 

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Have you tried the Steam Controller yet?

Subject: General Tech | January 25, 2016 - 01:27 PM |
Tagged: input, Steam Controller

The claims seem suspect; how exactly can a Steam Controller replace a mouse and keyboard when gaming?  That suspicion is being tested over at The Tech Report who recently tried out Valve's new Steam Controller, comparing it not only to a standard PC input setup but also to a XBox controller.  For the test they used Rocket League, Team Fortress 2, Just Cause 3, and Helldivers with mixed results.  In the end the Steam Controller was just not as useful as the Logitech M570 trackball, wireless keyboard, and Xbox 360 controller the reviewer is used to.  That said, with a lot of practice and time spent tweaking your input profiles you could find the Steam Controller is for you ... if you want it.

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"Valve's Steam Controller is supposed to obviate the mouse and keyboard for PC gaming in the living room. We put our thumbs on the Steam Controller's twin trackpads and took it for a spin to see whether it does the job."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk