Fabulous fablessness? AMD looking to ASMedia for chip R&D?

Subject: General Tech | June 5, 2014 - 02:04 PM |
Tagged: amd, asmedia, asus, rumour

DigiTimes spilled a juicy rumour today which has AMD looking to a work even more closely with ASMedia in the future.  AMD has already partnered with this ASUS subsidiary to integrate SATA Express into their newest chips as a way to save development costs and ease production issues.  This goes along with AMD's fabless strategy that started with the split off of GLOBALFOUNDRIES and has since lead to partnerships with other major fabbers like TSMC.  While still very much in the rumour phase and with AMD refusing to comment we are not sure this will indeed occur but it does fit with AMD's current strategy of price reductions and may free up their engineers to work on more specialized designs.

asmedia-85228274.jpg

"AMD reportedly is planning to outsource its PC chipset R&D to ASMedia Technology, a subsidiary of Asustek Computer, to save costs and the cooperation is expected to greatly benefit ASMedia's revenue performance, according to sources from the upstream supply chain."

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Source: DigiTimes

Computex 2014: Samsung 845DC EVO Enterprise TLC SSDs

Subject: General Tech, Storage | June 4, 2014 - 07:37 PM |
Tagged: computex 2014, computex, tlc, ssd, Samsung, 845DC EVO

Well that was an alphabet soup of a title.

Samsung has just announced a new line of SSDs, based on three bit per cell (TLC) memory, for enterprise customers. The Samsung 845DC EVO is rated at 530MB/s reads with 87,000 IOPS. The company will also cover up to 600TB of writes under its warranty (no mention of length in years, though). The drive will be available "later this month" in 240GB, 480GB, and 960GB models. Samsung did not mention price in their press release, but Anandtech claims the 240GB will be $250, the 480GB will be $490, and the 960GB will be $969.

Samsung's SSDs will give you some TLC???

This is basically $1/GB scaling, plus $10. I must admit, this is getting pricy. In the consumer space, we have recently seen 512GB for $199. That said, SSDs are not known for sticking to their MSRP. Also, these are enterprise-rated drives. Being TLC-based, I wonder how much (if any) SLC-style write cache was included, as per the consumer 840 EVO.

Lastly, Samsung claims that these drives use around 4W under load. This is much lower than hard drives but a little high for SSDs, according to benchmarks that I have seen. That said, there are a few ways to parse that (for example, if they mean that its peak is typically 4W, which would be pretty good for a 960GB drive).

The Samsung 845DC EVO will be available later this month for a little over $1/GB.

Source: Samsung

Baaaaa! Why so serious?

Subject: General Tech | June 4, 2014 - 02:29 PM |
Tagged: goat simulator, gaming, fun

It seems that gaming has become a lot less about having a good time over the past few years.  An entire branch of gaming expects you to run a treadmill of low level quests before you get to the point where you can actually start exploring and many people will not even pick up a game if they can't get achievements for simply playing something that they should be able to enjoy for the simple sake of playing. 

It is more than that however, we have progressed from teabagging and hurling vulgarities at any and all players, be they friendlies or enemies, to having a subgroup of gamers actively insulting so called 'casual gamers' and 'fake gamer girls' in social media and other public forums.  Somehow the idea that gaming is enjoyable because it is a game has been overwhelmed by those who find their fun in deriding other players.

Perhaps this is why Coffee Stain Studio's Goat Simulator has caused such a divide of opinions in gamers; those who can see the fun of wandering around smashing things and generally being silly love it. Those with a need to either prove themselves better than everyone, or at least that everyone is worse than they are can't grasp the idea of purely enjoying a game because it is simply amusing in and of itself.

For those still able to enjoy pure silliness you should read through the full patch notes of Goat Simulator 1.1 on Rock, Paper, SHOTGUN; the addition of a new map and split screen multiplayer has nothing on the notes involving Flappy Goat, the "Applying plastic wrap around your screen will now give you a 3D-effect." or Minecraft goat.  If you have even a tiny bit of a sense of humour left you should also watch the accompanying trailer.

If you want to play with the Fragging Frogs, the most fun frog-based gaming community around, you had best practice having fun. For those of you who never lost that playful spirit, come on it and join in the fun!

"Goat Simulator really is just the dumbest thing, isn’t it? Naturally, that’s why everyone in the whole world loves it and I have a pet goat now. I was surprised (and let’s face it: a bit saddened) to find that real goats have functional neck bones and lack tongues that stretch like elastic and stick like gorilla glue, but them’s the breaks. Related: do not hurl real goats into traffic. They will break. That got a bit dark there, didn’t it? But you know what’s not dark?"

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Gaming

A quick walk around Computex 2014

Subject: General Tech, Shows and Expos | June 4, 2014 - 01:23 PM |
Tagged: thermaltake, roccat, nzxt, gigabyte, computex 2014, asus

The Tech Report has been busy at Computex, visiting as many booths as they can in amongst the numerous vendors showing off their upcoming products.  From ASUS we get another look at the ROG systems and a G-Sync monitor as several new motherboardsBoth Thermaltake and Roccat have new peripherals to show off while NZXT is more focussed on cooling products.  Gigabyte has taken advantage of the event to show how fast their limited edition Z97X-SOC Force LN2 can push DDR3, hitting 4.5GHz in a live demo!  There is more coverage that that, as well as our own, so you can expect to be busy over the next few days.

gigabyte-ln2.jpg

"Earlier today at Computex, Asus let loose a veritable cornucopia of items under its Republic of Gamers brand. Among them: two stylish mini gaming desktops plus a 27" display outfitted with Nvidia's G-Sync technology."

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The ASUS Transformer Book T200TA springs a leak

Subject: General Tech | June 4, 2014 - 12:45 AM |
Tagged: asus, transformer book, T200TA, Atom Z3775, Bay Trail, leak

A post on the German site Mobile Geeks gives us the stats on the ASUS Transformer Book T200TA, a Bay Trail powered that appears to sport the normal docking tendencies of the Transformer Book line up.  It is rumoured to be powered by a Bay Trail Atom Z3775 which can reach 2.39GHz at full speed with 2GB of memory, WiFi, local flash storage of up to 64GB. The outputs include USB 3.0, microUSB 2.0 port, HDMI and even without the optional dock you get SD card reader.  The dock can raise your local storage to 500GB and likely extend the battery life.

asus-transformer-book-t200ta-teaser (1).jpg

Product may not be exactly as shown

Source: Mobile Geeks

VESA Releases DockPort™ Standard

Subject: General Tech, Displays, Mobile | June 3, 2014 - 07:54 PM |
Tagged: vesa, dockport, DisplayPort, amd

Remember DockPort?  The three in one connection we have discussed in the past? The Thunderbolt-ish connection for devices with DisplayPort which allows transmission of —audio and video plus USB data and power all on one connector.  It's here!   (even if the devices aren't quite common yet)

DockPort_Logo.jpg

NEWARK, CA (3 June 2014) – The Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA) today announced the release of the DockPort standard. Developed by several VESA member companies, DockPort is an optional extension of the DisplayPort standard that will allow USB 3.1 data and DC power for battery charging to be carried over a single DisplayPort connector and cable that also carries high-resolution audio/video (A/V) data.

This new extension of the DisplayPort standard is fully backward compatible with all existing DisplayPort devices. When a DockPort-enabled DisplayPort source —such as a computer or tablet— is connected with a DockPort-enabled DisplayPort sink— such as a display monitor or docking station —A/V plus USB data and power will be transferred over a common cable through a single connector. If either the source or sink device is not a DockPort-enabled, then source and sink will recognize only the DisplayPort A/V data stream.

“As computing platforms become increasingly mobile, it becomes necessary to reduce the number of external connectors,” explained Steve Belt, Corporate Vice President - Strategic Alliances & Solutions Enablement AMD, a VESA member company. “With DockPort, VESA has developed a technology standard that enhances elegant docking designs, reduces mobile form factors, and enriches the user experience with streamlined, one-cable access to a wide range of external displays, peripherals and storage.”

DockPort is the first royalty-free industry standard that combines these three essential interface functions into a single connector. VESA first revealed its intention to develop this standard at the 2014 International Consumer Electrics Show. It anticipates that several vendors will demonstrate DockPort-enabled DisplayPort systems at Computex Taiwan, which begins today.

“Until today, most mobile computing platforms required three separate interfaces to support power charging, data transmission and external video,” said Chris Griffith, Business Development Manager for Consumer and Computing Interface at Texas Instruments, a VESA member company. “With DockPort, VESA has elegantly merged this ungainly tangle of wires into a single, sleek connector, combining power charging with the industry’s most popular data transport—USB—and the industry’s highest-speed A/V transport—DisplayPort. DockPort can reduce system implementation cost as designers can reduce external connectors and simplify docking implementations.”

VESA is developing a compliance test protocol to certify systems that meet the DockPort standard. Systems that satisfy this test protocol will be permitted to display VESA’s new DockPort logo on their packaging as a guide for consumers seeking this capability.

“The new DockPort standard demonstrates the enormous adaptability of the DisplayPort standard,” according to VESA Board Chair Alan Kobayashi, Fellow & Executive R&D Management for DisplayPort Group at MegaChips Technology America. “On the one hand, DisplayPort is a flexible A/V transport protocol that easily coexists with other protocols, like USB—it plays nicely with others. On the other hand, DisplayPort is also a robust and proven connector design whose electro-mechanical properties can accommodate data and power over a common passive copper cable and interface.”

Dockport VESA version.jpg

Source: VESA

More hints on Devil's Canyon

Subject: General Tech | June 3, 2014 - 02:47 PM |
Tagged: Intel, i7-4790k, devil's canyon, computex 2014, computex, 4790k

The biggest improvement for overclockers on the new Devil's Canyon processors goes by the name of Next-Generation Polymer Thermal Interface Material; which will replace the much maligned TIM used on Haswell chips that many have blamed for poor overclocking results.  So far the news is good but as no samples have arrived anywhere for review we still await the final word.  As it is an LGA 1150 processor the current heatsinks will cool this chip and in theory a BIOS/UEFI update should allow them to run on current Z87 boards making it a very easy upgrade.  As you can see in the list the speeds are raised slightly from the previous generation, check out the other features [H]ard|OCP heard about right here.

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"Intel is presenting its new Devil's Canyon processors today at Computex in Taiwan. Enthusiasts get a two new processor solutions, one with HyperThreading and one without. While many of us are familiar with processor core clocks of 4GHz+, this is first time we have Intel serving up a minimum 4GHz clock on its enthusiast K processor."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

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Source: [H]ard|OCP

Computex 2014: WD Shows SATA Express-based PCIe HDD

Subject: General Tech, Storage, Shows and Expos | June 3, 2014 - 03:37 AM |
Tagged: computex, computex 2014, WD, ssd, pcie, SATA Express, hdd

SATA Express is an interface to either connect a hard drive to PCIe lanes, or up to two drives via SATA. Obviously, PCIe bandwidth over a cable connection is the real draw. To use the full speed, however, the drive needs to be able to communicate over PCIe. Currently, the standard uses two PCI Express 2.0 lanes (1 GB/s).

WD-SATAe-demo.jpg

Now that Z97 and H97 have launched, WD is set to show off the technology at Computex. The above image is apparently of a dual-drive product, containing 4TB of rotating media and 128GB of SSD memory. I am immediately reminded of the Western Digital Black2 dual drive which Allyn reviewed last November. That product crammed a 120GB SSD into a 2.5" 1TB HDD, which appeared to the system as two separate drives. The drive has "Technology Demonstration" written in red font right on it, but it could be a good representation of what the company is thinking about.

WD also asserts that their prototype uses standard AHCI drivers, for OS compatibility.

If you want to see this product in action, then -- well -- you kind-of need to be at Computex. At some point, you might be able to see it in your own PC. When? How much? No pricing and availability, again, because it is a tech demo.

Source: WD

Computex 2014: ASUS Announces ROG G20 Compact Gaming Desktop and ROG GR8 Gaming Console PC

Subject: General Tech, Systems, Shows and Expos | June 3, 2014 - 12:46 AM |
Tagged: ROG, gaming pc, computex 2014, computex, asus

Gaming PCs are often misunderstood. Many of our viewers will probably build their own from their personal selection of parts. If you would like to have someone else handle it, then an oft dismissed option is going through a system builder. If you find an option that is in your budget and has the performance you desire, then it is perfectly acceptable to buy it.

ASUS has just announced two offerings, branded Republic of Gamers (ROG), for you to consider.

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The ROG G20 Gaming Desktop can be customized with options which range up to an Intel Core i7 with an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780. It is designed to be quiet, with expected noise at around 23-25 dbA (it is unclear whether this is measured idle or under load). While it has two fans, it also uses "natural convection" cooling, a process which uses the excess heat to make hot air rise, which is replaced by cool air that cools the components.

Yup, the PC cools itself with the air motion caused by its own heat.

After customizations, the ROG G20 Gaming Desktop is expected to retail for $800-$1700, depending on what options the user selects, and be available in late Q3, for North Americans.

ASUS_ROG_GR8_Gaming_Console_PC.jpg

The other PC is the ROG GR8 Gaming Desktop. This device will include an Intel Core i7 and an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti. Despite its form factor, a side panel allows user access to RAM and storage. It has Gigabit Ethernet and built-in 802.11ac wireless. While it obviously has HDMI outputs, it also includes DisplayPort.

ASUS does not currently have an expected price range, but it will also be available Q3, for North Americans.

Source: ASUS

NVIDIA Launches GeForce Experience 2.1

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards | June 2, 2014 - 05:52 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, geforce, geforce experience, ShadowPlay

NVIDIA has just launched another version of their GeForce Experience, incrementing the version to 2.1. This release allows video of up to "2500x1600", which I assume means 2560x1600, as well as better audio-video synchronization in Adobe Premiere. Also, because why stop going after FRAPS once you start, it also adds an in-game framerate indicator. It also adds push-to-talk for recording the microphone.

nvidia-geforce-experience.png

Another note: when GeForce Experience 2.0 launched, it introduced streaming of the user's desktop. This allowed recording of OpenGL and windowed-mode games by simply capturing an entire monitor. This mode was not capable of "Shadow Mode", which I believed was because they thought users didn't want a constant rolling video to be taken of their desktop in the event that they wanted to save a few minutes of it at some point. Turns out that I was wrong; the feature was coming and it arrived with GeForce Experience 2.1.

GeForce Experience 2.1 is now available at NVIDIA's website, unless it already popped up a notification for you.

Source: NVIDIA

Computex 2014: Acer XB280HK Is 28-inch 4K with G-Sync

Subject: General Tech, Displays, Shows and Expos | June 2, 2014 - 03:27 PM |
Tagged: XB280HK, g-sync, computex 2014, computex, acer, 4k

Speaking of G-Sync monitors, Acer has announced a 4K monitor ahead of Computex with NVIDIA's adaptive refresh rate technology. While they do not ever say that it is 60Hz, I believe that it is. It also seems to be based on a TN panel. It, being G-Sync, connects with DisplayPort 1.2 and also includes four USB 3.0 ports. It, however, does not seem to support the competing AMD's FreeSync, integrated into VESA's DisplayPort 1.2a standard.

gsync-logo.jpg

We do not currently have an image of the monitor

4K could be where we really start seeing benefits for G-Sync. At that resolution, it is very difficult to get a system, regardless of how many GPUs are inside it, which can play the most modern of games without dipping below 60 FPS. Once you miss your 16.67 millisecond window, your game starts hitching between images living 33.33ms and 16.67ms, when each frame is supposed to be presented at a constant rate.

As for pricing and availability: Q2 (early May to end of July). That's all we know.

For more Computex 2014 coverage, please check out our feed!

Source: Acer

Computex 2014: ASUS PG278Q Is G-Sync and 144Hz at 1440p

Subject: General Tech, Displays, Shows and Expos | June 2, 2014 - 02:28 PM |
Tagged: g-sync, displays, display, computex 2014, computex, asus, 2560x1440, 144hz, 1440p

NVIDIA's G-Sync allows video cards to time the refresh rate of monitors. This is an advantage because the GPU knows when a frame is actually ready to be displayed to the user. The initial batch of announcements were each 1080p monitors, which are least likely to dip down into the 30-60Hz gap where G-Sync is noticeable.

asus-pg278q.jpg

Today at Computex, ASUS has announced a 27", 2560x1440, 144Hz G-Sync display. This higher resolution is starting to reach the point where faster graphics cards struggle to maintain 60 FPS. Not only that, but it is one of the first 1440p panels that you can get which supports high (over 100Hz) refresh rates, officially. Others exist, but "rare" is an understatement.

Its response rate is 1ms (GTG) which, unfortunately, suggests a TN panel. This might be a deal-breaker for some, but if you are looking for a G-Sync, 1440p, and high refresh rate panel, then it might be an acceptable compromise.

The ASUS PG278Q is available in Q2, which ASUS seems to define as the beginning of May to the end of July, for $799 USD. Unfortunately for AMD fans, the panel does not seem to support FreeSync, recently added to DisplayPort 1.2a. FreeSync, of course, is the competitor to G-Sync that AMD proposed to the VESA standards body.

For more Computex 2014 coverage, please check out our feed!

Source: ASUS

Computex 2014: Corsair's Cherry MX RGB Keyboards Launch

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling, Shows and Expos | June 2, 2014 - 07:01 AM |
Tagged: computex, Computer 2014

Cherry MX RGB key switches were teased since December but not yet made into a product. They generated interest by integrating red, green, and blue LEDs that, together, are capable of glowing any one of 16 million colors. Each key can even glow its own color and brightness independently, allowing users to color certain zones, with animation, if desired. Corsair had a year of exclusivity over this switch with their line of keyboards which they have done nothing with, so far.

Today, they announce that MX RGB switches will be available in four models:

  • K70 RGB Red, available in late July ($169.99 MSRP)
  • K70 RGB Blue, available in late August ($169.99 MSRP)
  • K70 RGB Brown, available in late August ($169.99 MSRP)
  • K95 RGB Red, available in late August ($189.99 MSRP)

If you happen to have wanted Cherry MX Blue or Brown, you will be looking at the K70 because the K95 RGB will only be available in Cherry MX RGB Red. Of course, that could change in future announcements but, even still, the main difference is the 18 macro keys. Honestly, though I have had several keyboards which offer these, I have never used mine. Then again, I also do not play MMOs or MOBAs so judge for yourself whether the extra keys are deal breakers.

VENG_K95_RGB_K_US_top.png

Corsair Vengeance K95 RGB

As usual, Corsair puts a lot of thought into their keyboards. Each one is based on an NKRO matrix which provides "100% anti-ghosting" (rant: more precisely, the keyboard is built well enough that it physically cannot ghost to require anti-ghosting). Even their first generation design aced my grueling test, where I spam the equivalent of several hundred words per minute as input and compare it to what the keyboard believes.

VENG_K70_RGB_K_US_top.png

Corsair Vengeance K70 RGB

Also announced, the M65 RGB Gaming Mouse. RGB LED lighting on a mouse is not as novel, but it will match your keyboard. That will be available late August for $69.99 MSRP.

All devices will come with a two (2) year warranty, which definitely gives confidence to someone considering peripherals in this price point.

For more Computex 2014 coverage, please check out our feed!

Source: Corsair

Computex 2014: Corsair's Flash Voyager GTX USB

Subject: General Tech, Storage, Shows and Expos | June 2, 2014 - 07:01 AM |
Tagged: usb 3.0, thumb drive, ssd, flash drive, corsair, computex 2014, computex

The Flash Voyager GTX is Corsair's attempt to be an SSD over USB 3.0. Differentiating itself from a standard USB flash drive, the Voyager GTX includes TRIM support, S.M.A.R.T. monitoring, and interfaces with USB Attached SCSI. It also comes in two, SSD-sized capacities, 128GB ($119.99) and 256GB ($199.99). These drives are rated at 450MB/s read and 350MB/s write.

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This pricing structure puts the Voyager GTX against the Samsung 840 Pro, which is an interesting comparison to make. Both drives are backed by a five (5) year warranty and, while the 840 Pro has higher read bandwidth, the write speeds are fairly comparable. IOPS and write durability is not listed for the Corsair Flash Voyager GTX but, even if they are marginally behind, this has the advantage of USB.

Benchmarking should be interesting for this. I would be curious if this could lead to portable OS installations and abrupt boosts to Steam library sizes, both with SSD-like speeds.

The Corsair Flash Voyager GTX USB 3.0 drives will be available in July. The 128GB version has an MSRP of $119.99, while the 256GB is listed at $199.99.

For more Computex 2014 coverage, please check out our feed!

Source: Corsair

Computex 2014: ASUS PA328Q 60Hz, Professional 4K Panel

Subject: General Tech, Displays | June 2, 2014 - 03:20 AM |
Tagged: pq321q, PA328Q, displays, display, computex 2014, computex, asus, 4k

You might remember the ASUS PQ321Q 4K monitor from last year that we loved. It was based on an IGZO panel and allowed for 60Hz via one DisplayPort 1.2 cable, running in Multi Stream Transport (MST). At Computex 2014, ASUS announced the PA328Q. This "ProArt" panel ships calibrated and offers 10-bit, 100% sRGB color representation. More interestingly, it supports HDMI 2.0 as well as DisplayPort 1.2, for 4K at 60Hz, apparently over a single cable.

asus-pa328q-fixed.jpg

The monitor also has an extra mini DisplayPort connector and two HDMI 1.4 inputs. Also, four (4) USB 3.0 ports and a headphone jack. I guess professionals like high-speed removable storage.

Some points that I would like to see clarified are:

  1. its Adobe RGB coverage (for printer color spaces)
  2. its panel type (I expect IGZO)
  3. and its pricing (and availability)...

I do not know how this fits in to the ASUS product stack, relative to the $3500 PQ321Q. It includes more modern connections and could hit the checkboxes for digital content creation at 4K. Its price might give us an idea about where it stands... or it might just blow our minds, one way or the other. For now, I don't know.

For more Computex 2014 coverage, please check out our feed!

Source: ASUS

A Summary of the Recent Open Source Security News

Subject: General Tech | June 1, 2014 - 04:04 AM |
Tagged: TrueCrypt, security, openssl, openssh, heartbleed

This week has been most notable for security, as previous news suggests. TrueCrypt, the popular file encryption suite, lost its developers when they wanted to call it quits -- right in the middle of its audit. While on that topic, OpenSSL is being given money and full-time developers, in response to the recent Heartbleed fiasco. OpenSSH and Network Time Protocol, and others in the future, are also being given love.

Yes, these are two separate pieces of news that are combined into a single article.

TrueCrypt_Logo.png

Earlier, we reported on TrueCrypt's mysterious implosion. The developers' alleged last advice, use closed source solutions or whatever comes up on a random package manager search, I considered too terrible to have been from them. Seriously, from "Trust No-One" to "Trust Who Knows". Just does not seem right...

Since the article, they have apparently been contacted and confirmed that the project is being shut down. That said, it seems like basically every source cites the third-party auditors and no-one else seemed to have direct contact with them -- so who knows. Regardless, the audit is apparently still going on and might lead to a usable fork maintained by someone else.

As for the second piece of news -- several other libraries are getting serious security audits. Apparently, The Linux Foundation has arranged for a long list of companies to commit $5.4 million, over three years, to audit and maintain these projects. As mentioned, OpenSSL, OpenSSH, and Network Time Protocol are the first three mentioned, but others will be included later. Also, that budget can increase as other companies and donors step up.

Currently, the donors are: Adobe, Amazon, Bloomberg, Cisco, Dell, Facebook, Fujitsu, Google, HP, Huawei, IBM, Intel, Microsoft, NetApp, Qualcomm, Rackspace, Salesforce, and VMware. Eighteen companies, each pledging $100,000 per year for three years.

All in all, it seems like the world is on the path to righting itself, somewhat.

Source: Ars Technica

Intel Announces "Cars Are Things" - with New Automotive Platform

Subject: General Tech | May 30, 2014 - 10:21 AM |
Tagged: SoC, linux, internet of things, Intel, automotive, automation, atom

Imagine: You get into the family car and it knows that it’s you, so it adjusts everything just the way you like it. You start driving and your GPS is superimposed over the road in real time from within your windshield, with virtual arrows pointing to your next turn. Kids play games on their touchscreen windows in the back, and everyone travels safely as their cars anticipate accidents...

Sound far-fetched? Work is already being done to make things like these a reality, and Intel has now announced their stake in the future of connected, and eventually autonomous, automobiles.

IMG_20140530_101730.jpg

Intel's new automotive computing platform

Ensuring that every device in our lives is always connected seems like the goal of many companies going forward, and the “Internet of Things” is a very real, and rapidly growing, part of the business world. Intel is no exception, and since cars are things (as I’ve been informed) it makes sense to look in this area as well, right? Well, Intel has announced development of their automotive initiative, with the overall goal to create safer - and eventually autonomous - cars. Doug Davis, Corporate VP, Internet of Things Group at Intel, hosted the online event, which began with a video depicting automotive travel in a fully connected world. It doesn’t seem that far away...

"We are combining our breadth of experience in consumer electronics and enterprise IT with a holistic automotive investment across product development, industry partnerships and groundbreaking research efforts,” Davis said. “Our goal is to fuel the evolution from convenience features available in the car today to enhanced safety features of tomorrow and eventually self-driving capabilities.”

IMG_20140530_114529.jpg

So how exactly does this work? The tangible element of Intel’s vision of connected, computer controlled vehicles begins with the In-Vehicle Solutions Platform which provides Intel silicon to automakers. And as it’s an “integrated solution” Intel points out that this should cut time and expense from the current, more complex methods employed in assembling automotive computer systems. Makes sense, since they are delivering a complete Intel Atom based system platform, powered by the E3800 processor. The OS is Tizen IVI ("automotive grade" Linux). A development kit was also announced, and there are already companies creating systems using this platform, according to Intel.

Source: Intel

AMD and NVIDIA get into a hairy argument

Subject: General Tech | May 29, 2014 - 07:43 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, gameworks, dirty pool, business as usual, amd

The topic on NVIDIA Gameworks was discussed at great length on last night's PCPer Podcast and from the live comments as well as the comments on Ryan's original story this is obviously a topic which draws strong opinions.  As it is always best to limit yourself to debating topics of which you are familiar with the facts The Tech Report's article on the aftereffects of the Forbes story is well worth a read.  Cyril had a chance to speak with a rep from NVIDIA's driver development team about Hallock's comments pertaining to NVIDIA's Gameworks and the legitimacy of AMD's complaints.  As you might expect there is a lot of denial and finger pointing from both sides; what long time enthusiasts might describe as 'business as usual'.  Both sides of this argument have vehemently denied ever attempting to undermine each others business but yet both sides can point to specific instances in which the competition has used questionable methods to get a leg (or hair) up on the competition.  

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"Earlier today, I spoke with Cem Cebenoyan, Director of Engineering for Developer Technology at Nvidia, who offered a rebuttal to a Forbes story we covered yesterday. In that story, AMD's Robert Hallock alleged that Nvidia's GameWorks program prevents AMD from working with game developers on GPU optimizations."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Podcast #302 - ASUS PB287Q 4K Monitor, NVIDIA and AMD's fight over GameWorks, Haswell-E Leaks and more!

Subject: General Tech | May 29, 2014 - 02:51 PM |
Tagged: video, podcast, asus, 4k, pb287q, nvidia, amd, gameworks, ubisoft, watch dogs, crucial, mx100, tegra k1, gsync

PC Perspective Podcast #302 - 05/29/2014

Join us this week as we discuss the ASUS PB287Q 4K Monitor, NVIDIA and AMD's fight over GameWorks, Haswell-E Leaks and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

  • iTunes - Subscribe to the podcast directly through the iTunes Store
  • RSS - Subscribe through your regular RSS reader
  • MP3 - Direct download link to the MP3 file

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Josh Walrath, Jeremy Hellstrom, and Allyn Maleventano

Program length: 1:29:01
  1. Week in Review:
  2. News items of interest:
  3. Hardware/Software Picks of the Week:
    1. Allyn: For Josh - the Wenger Giant Knife
  4. Closing/outro

 

TrueCrypt Taken Offline Doesn't Pass My Smell Test

Subject: Editorial, General Tech | May 29, 2014 - 02:17 AM |
Tagged: TrueCrypt

It should not pass anyone's smell test but it apparently does, according to tweets and other articles. Officially, the TrueCrypt website (which redirects to their SourceForge page) claims that, with the end of Windows XP support (??), the TrueCrypt development team wants users to stop using their software. Instead, they suggest a switch to BitLocker, Mac OSX built-in encryption, or whatever random encryption suite comes up when you search your Linux distro's package manager (!?). Not only that, but several versions of Windows (such as 7 Home Premium) do not have access to BitLocker. Lastly, none of these are a good solution for users who want a single encrypted container across multiple OSes.

A new version (don't use it!!!) called TrueCrypt 7.2 was released and signed with their private encryption key.

TrueCrypt_Logo.png

The developers have not denied the end of support, and its full-of-crap reason. (Seriously, because Microsoft deprecated Windows XP almost two months ago, they pull support for a two year old version now?)

They have also not confirmed it. They have been missing since at least "the announcement" (or earlier if they were not the ones who made it). Going missing and unreachable, the day of your supposedly gigantic resignation announcement, does not support the validity of that announcement. 

To me, that is about as unconfirmed as you can get.

Still, people are believing the claims that TrueCrypt 7.1a is not secure. The version has been around since February 2012 and, beyond people looking at its source code, has passed a significant portion of a third-party audit. Even if you believe the website, it only says that TrueCrypt will not be updated for security. It does not say that TrueCrypt 7.1a is vulnerable to any known attack.

In other words, the version that has been good enough for over two years, and several known cases of government agencies being unable to penetrate it, is probably as secure today as it was last week.

"The final version", TrueCrypt 7.2, is a decrypt-only solution. It allows users to unencrypt existing vaults, although who knows what else it does, to move it to another solution. The source code changes have been published, and they do not seem shady so far, but since we cannot even verify that their private key has not leaked, I wouldn't trust it. A very deep compromise could make finding vulnerabilities very difficult.

So what is going on? Who knows. One possibility is that they were targeted for a very coordinated hack, one which completely owned them and their private key, performed by someone(s) who spent a significant amount of time modifying a fake 7.2 version. Another possibility is that they were legally gagged and forced to shut down operations, but they managed to negotiate a method for users to decrypt existing data with a neutered build.

One thing is for sure, if this is a GoG-style publicity stunt, I will flip a couple of tables.

We'll see. ┻━┻ \_()_/ ┻━┻

Source: TrueCrypt