A professional class monitor on a reasonable budget, BenQ BL3200PT

Subject: Displays | November 24, 2014 - 01:53 PM |
Tagged: 2560x1440, mva, benq, BL3200PT, 32, professional monitor

Displays using Multi-domain Vertical Alignment, aka MVA, offer better response times than standard IPS panels and better viewing angle and colour than ones using TN, sitting somewhat in the middle of these two standards in quality and price. BenQ has released an 32", LED backlit 2560x1440 A-MVA display called the BL3200PT with a 100% colour gamut and 1.07 billion colours, aimed at the professional designer on a bit of a budget.  The MSRP of $800 makes it far more affordable than many of the 4K monitors on the market and the use of MVA instead of IPS also helps lower the price without sacrificing too much quality.  The connectivity options are impressive, HDMI, DisplayPort, dual-link DVI, and D-Sub, along with audio, two USB plugs and a card reader should ensure that you can connect this display to the necessary resources and it can be adjusted vertically as well as tilt and swivel and is capable of portrait mode.  Check out Hardware Canucks full review here.

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"BenQ's BL3200PT combines a massive screen size with an Advanced-MVA panel to create a monitor that's a perfect fit for optimizing workflow while delivering good color reproduction."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

Samsung Announces First FreeSync UHD Monitors

Subject: Displays | November 20, 2014 - 10:50 AM |
Tagged: TN, Samsung, nvidia, monitor, ips, g-sync, freesync, amd

We have been teased for the past few months about when we would see the first implementations of AMD’s FreeSync technology, but now we finally have some concrete news about who will actually be producing these products.

Samsung has announced that they will be introducing the world’s first FreeSync enabled Ultra HD monitors.  The first models to include this feature will be the updated UD590 and the new UE850.  These will be introduced to the market in March of 2015.  The current UD590 monitor is a 28” unit with 3845x2160 resolution with up to 1 billion colors.  This looks to be one of those advanced TN panels that are selling from $500 to $900, depending on the model.

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AMD had promised some hand’s on time for journalists by the end of this year, and shipping products in the first half of next year.  It seems that Samsung is the first to jump on the wagon.  We would imagine that others will be offering the technology.  In theory this technology offers many of the same benefits of NVIDIA’s G-SYNC, but it does not require the same level of hardware.  I can imagine that we will be seeing some interesting comparisons next year with shipping hardware and how Free-Sync stacks up to G-SYNC.

Joe Chan, Vice President of Samsung Electronics Southeast Asia Headquarters commented, “We are very pleased to adopt AMD FreeSync technology to our 2015 Samsung Electronics Visual Display division’s UHD monitor roadmap, which fully supports open standards.  With this technology, we believe users including gamers will be able to enjoy their videos and games to be played with smoother frame display without stuttering or tearing on their monitors.”

Source: Samsung

Report: Dell's New 4K Monitors Have 60Hz IPS Panels

Subject: Displays | November 19, 2014 - 07:31 PM |
Tagged: monitor, ips monitor, display, dell, 4k

Dell has released two new 4K monitors, and according to a story published by The Tech Report these are using IPS panels.

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The new models are available on Dell's site priced starting at $599, which puts them into what had been TN territory just a few months ago. The original report came from TFT Central, which claimed to have leaked information about new 4K monitors from Dell with 60Hz IPS panels. Dell released the leaked model numbers at just $599 and $699 for the 24-inch and 27-inch versions, respectively.

Updated: Dell's website specifies that these are in fact IPS in the full tech specs rundown for each panel. I surmised that these could potentially be a VA or other panel type as well, as of course IPS is not the only display technology capable of wide viewing angles.

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Dell's listing for the 24" model

The monitors arrive factory-calibrated to 99% sRGB color (according to Dell's product pages) and feature tilt, swivel, and rotation, so they could be a great option where the full 178° viewing angle is preferred over the existing TN-based 4K offerings.

LG 31MU97 Professional DCI 4K Monitor Now Available

Subject: Displays | November 3, 2014 - 08:36 PM |
Tagged: LG, digital cinema 4k, digital cinema, adobergb, 4k

When we mention 4K monitors, they typically have a resolution of 3840x2160. Digital Cinema 4K adds an extra 256 pixels horizontally, yielding 4096x2160 (an aspect ratio between 17:9 and 19:10). LG Electronics has just released a monitor at this resolution for video and graphics professionals, and its feature set is strongly focused on that market.

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First, with a Digital Cinema 4K resolution, the monitor is capable of previewing content in that resolution without scaling or cropping. Alternatively, software could preview consumer 4K ("UltraHD") and have a little leftover room for user interface elements.

What really sets this apart from other monitors is its color space features. This is an actual IPS panel, providing wide viewing angles, and it supports 10-bit color input for smoother gradients. Its color space is large, too. Beyond sRGB, it also covers 99.5% of the AdobeRGB color space and 97% of the DCI-P3 gamut. LG even has a mode that splits the monitor into two, one side in AdobeRGB and the other in sRGB. This is intended for artists and publishers to see content both in the color space of professional printers (AdobeRGB) and websites on consumer displays (sRGB).

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While I believe this panel is rated at 60 Hz, it does not explicitly say that anywhere (that I found). I emailed LG for clarification and I will update if/when they reply. Update (Nov 4 @ 7:45pm EST): Still no word from LG, but one reader pointed me to an Overclockers UK product page that claims 60 Hz over DisplayPort and Mini DisplayPort. A second reader claims to own one of these monitors, which is running at 60Hz over Mini DisplayPort. It sounds like it supports 60Hz SST.

If it is a 60 Hz panel, this is an interesting, 31-inch display, especially at an MSRP of $1399.99. It undercuts competitors, like the Dell Ultrasharp 32, by over a thousand dollars. The LG 31MU97 is available now at a few online retailers.

Source: LG

ASUS and Robert Morris University Partner for "eSports"

Subject: General Tech, Displays | September 22, 2014 - 11:00 PM |
Tagged: esports, asus, vg248qe

I am a little torn about the term "eSports". Yes, I've used it. It is the accepted name. According to the definition, it mostly fits its role. Grammar and language are also fluid concepts, too. They can mean different things as time passes. I guess my real problem is that it attempts to snuggle up to "sports" for acceptance, but maintains a single-letter divider (unlike golf and, to some extent, curling). In my opinion, it is either a sport or it is something else entirely (a game, maybe?).

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Apparently they support StarCraft, too.

Also, it should be considered legitimate. Spectator sports are for entertainment, and "eSports" are entertaining to watch. Sure, it is not for everyone -- but neither is any other sport.

Two organizations that do consider it legitimate is ASUS and Robert Morris University (RMU). The college has recently announced scholarships for the top League of Legends players. After all, a sports scholarship is just an advertisement expense from the university's view. That applies to any sports scholarship. The point is to lure students to your campus and spectators to sporting events. Consistent winnings and great players gets your name out there on both fronts. There is nothing wrong with that, as long as they uphold a high standard of education, too.

Today's news is that ASUS partnered with RMU to provide "over three dozen" monitors to the university. Specifically, the VG248QE 24-inch, 144Hz display. This is almost $10,000 USD of hardware at current retail price. The press release is unclear whether ASUS donated the panels, or if they were sold at a discount. I reached out to the university over Twitter for clarification.

Honestly, I find this interesting and an innovative extension on old practices.

Source: ASUS

Oculus Announces Crescent Bay (Prototype)

Subject: General Tech, Displays | September 21, 2014 - 01:55 AM |
Tagged: Oculus, VR, crescent bay, oculus connect

As they progress toward a consumer product, Oculus announced another prototype at their Oculus Connect developer conference. Dubbed Crescent Bay, the headset contains a new display, with a higher refresh rate and higher resolution, better optics, and 360-degree head tracking. It is also lighter and includes built-in speakers.

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Of course, these features were not quantified with hard specifications.

Brendan Iribe, CEO of Oculus, stressed that this is not the consumer product yet. He claims that this is an increase over DK2 that is equivalent to the increase DK2 saw over the original Oculus Rift. It is not all about hardware, though. This company is engaged in hardware and software, video and audio. This should make sense considering their early acquisition of John Carmack and hundreds of other engineers. They, rightly, see themselves as a platform and, while they see game engines as necessary for VR, due to the ability to reposition the camera in milliseconds of notice, compared to film's never, they are not limiting themselves to just "games" (but yes they consider it a big part of it).

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Honestly, months ago, I was sitting at my desk with its five monitors, each with bits of news posts, chats, reference material, and maybe a StarCraft tournament live stream, and Oculus was being discussed. I started to wonder if monitors, especially multiple displays, are just an approximation -- our current best effort -- of how to receive video cues from a PC. I could see a VR platform take on entertainment and even productivity with its infinite, virtual environments.

Currently, there is not even a hint about pricing and availability (as far as I found).

Source: Oculus

Three Display Component Vendors Support AMD FreeSync

Subject: Graphics Cards, Displays | September 18, 2014 - 06:52 PM |
Tagged: amd, freesync, DisplayPort, adaptive sync

MStar, Novatek, and Realtek, three vendors of scaler units for use in displays, have announced support for AMD's FreeSync. Specifically, for the Q1'15 line of monitors, these partners will provide scaler chips that use DisplayPort Adaptive-Sync and, when paired with a compatible AMD GPU, will support FreeSync.

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The press release claims that these scalar chips will either support 1080p and 1440p monitors that are up to 144Hz, or drive 4K displays that are up to 60Hz. While this is promising, at least compared to the selection at G-Sync's launch a year earlier, it does not mean that this variety of monitors will be available -- just that internal components will be available for interested display vendors. Also, it means that there are probably interested display vendors.

AMD and partners "intend to reveal" displays via a "media review program" in Q1. This is a little later than what we expected from Richard Huddy's "next month" statements, but it is possible that "Sampling" and "Media Review Program" are two different events. Even if it is "late", this is the sort of thing that is forgivable to me (missing a few months while relying on a standards body and several, independent companies).

Source: AMD

Acer's two new XBO series gaming displays; G-SYNC on both, 4k on one

Subject: Displays | September 18, 2014 - 05:59 PM |
Tagged: Acer XB270H, XB280HK, 4k, g-sync

The Acer XB280HK is a 28" 4K G-SYNC display which will launch next month at expected price of US$799 or $849.99CDN.  The XB270H is a 27" 1080p display also with G-SYNC support and is currently available at $599USD or $649CDN.  As both are rated with a 1ms response time it is likely these are backlit TN panels but with the recent advances in TN panels the viewing angles should be much better than the original generation.

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SAN JOSE, Calif., Sept. 18, 2014 – Acer America is bringing its new XBO series gaming displays featuring NVIDIA G-SYNC technology to gaming enthusiasts in North America. This cutting-edge line delivers significant performance advantages that infuse gaming with incredibly smooth, realistic and responsive visuals, elevating game play to a new level of stunning realism.

The two XBO series display models for North America include the Acer XB280HK boasting a 28-inch 4K2K Ultra HD (3840 x 2160) display with a @60Hz refresh rate and the Acer XB270H with a 27-inch screen and a maximum Full HD 1080p @ 144Hz resolution. Both models provide a quick 1ms response time, further enhancing in-game performance. They also feature revolutionary NVIDIA G-SYNC technology, comfortable ergonomics and excellent connectivity.

“We’re excited to bring these first-rate gaming displays to gamers in the United States and Canada,” said Ronald Lau, Acer America business manager. “The incredibly sharp and smooth images provided by NVIDIA G-SYNC technology are sure to thrill the most avid gamers. Combined with Acer’s highly flexibly ergonomic stand, non-glare ComfyView panel and low dimming technology, users are assured long hours of both comfortable and visually stunning game play.”  

NVIDIA G-SYNC: Picture-Perfect Visuals
NVIDIA G-SYNC technology ensures that every frame rendered by the GPU is perfectly portrayed by synchronizing the monitor’s refresh rates to the GPU in a GeForce GTX-powered PC. This breakthrough technology eliminates screen tearing and minimizes display stutter and input lag to deliver a smooth, fast and breathtaking gaming experience on the hottest PC gaming titles. Scenes appear instantly, objects look visually sharp, and gameplay is more responsive to provide faster reaction times, giving gamers a competitive edge.

“NVIDIA G-SYNC technology dramatically improves the way gamers see their games, by delivering images that are fast, sharp and stutter-free,” said Tom Petersen, distinguished engineer at NVIDIA. “This is the way games were meant to be played, and gamers will absolutely love these new Acer XBO monitors.”

Comfortable Ergonomics
By making gaming as comfortable as possible, the XBO series monitors help extend game time with three Acer innovations. Acer flicker-less technology reduces eye strain via a stable power supply that eliminates screen flicker. Its low dimming technology provides users the ability to adjust brightness down to 15 percent in low-light environments and Acer ComfyView non-glare screen reduces reflection for clearer viewing, a significant benefit for gamers.

A flexible, multi-function ErgoStand extends a wide range of options for maximum comfort and viewing perspectives. For finding the best angle, the screen tilts from -5 to -35 degrees and the height can be raised by up to 5.9 inches. In addition, the base rotates 120 degrees from left to right for easy screen sharing during game play and collaboration with others. Plus, the screen pivots from horizontal to vertical to accommodate two entirely different gaming scenarios.

Both new XBO series monitors deliver wide viewing angles up to 170 degrees horizontal and up to 160 degrees vertical. The Acer XB280HK delivers 1.07 billion colors and the Acer XB270HL provides 16.7 million colors, while both offer a native contrast ratio of 1000:1, a 300 nits brightness and a 72 percent NTSC color saturation, a combination that delivers exceptionally vibrant, detailed and high-quality imagery.

Superb Connectivity
The displays come with DisplayPort as well as high-speed USB 3.0 ports (1 up, 4 down) that are located on the side and down of screen for easily connecting a mouse, keyboard, gaming headset, joystick and other peripherals. One of the USB ports is equipped for battery charging.  

Eco-Friendly Design
EPEAT Gold registered, the highest level of EPEAT registration available, the displays meet all of EPEAT’s required criteria and at least 75 percent of EPEAT’s optional criteria. They’re also mercury-free and LED-backlit, which reduces energy costs by consuming less power than standard CCFL-backlit displays. ENERGY STAR 6.0 and TCO 6.0 qualified, they adhere to strict environmental, performance and ergonomic design standards.

Pricing and Availability
The Acer XB270H is available now at leading online retailers in the United States and Canada with a MSRP of US$599 and $649.99 CAD. The Acer XB280HK will be available next month at leading online retailers in the United States and Canada with a manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) of US$799 and $849.99 CAD.

Acer displays are backed by professional, high-quality technical support and a three-year warranty. Acer’s online community at community.acer.com provides customers discussion forums, answers to frequently asked questions and the opportunity to share ideas for new and enhanced services and products.

Source: Acer

VESA Releases DisplayPort 1.3 Standard

Subject: General Tech, Displays | September 15, 2014 - 04:05 PM |
Tagged: displayport 1.3, freesync, 5k, vesa, dockport

It is official, DisplayPort 1.3 has finished VESA approval and should be hitting the streets in the near future.  Freesync support came with 1.2a which is why it was not mentioned, however DockPort has been enhanced with the higher 8.1 Gbps link rate for each of the four lanes present which means you can support a 4k monitor using two of those lanes, leaving the other two available for USB, audio or even power.

This also means that 4k and even 5k monitors can function over a single DisplayPort 1.3 cable without any compression and with the use of VESA's Coordinated Video Timing you can have a pair of 4k monitors function in multi-monitor mode ... assuming you have the graphical horsepower to run 7680 x 2160.  It is rather impressive to see this jump to 32.4 Gbps combined link rate that can deliver 25.92 Gbps of uncompressed video data.

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Newark, CA (15 September 2014) The Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA) announced the release of the DisplayPort 1.3 audio / video (A/V) standard. An update to the widely used DisplayPort 1.2a standard, this latest version increases the maximum link bandwidth to 32.4 Gbps, with each of four lanes running at a link rate of 8.1 Gbps/lane a 50% increase from the previous version of the DisplayPort standard. Allowing for transport overhead, DisplayPort's 32.4 Gbps combined link rate delivers 25.92 Gbps of uncompressed video data.

The increased bandwidth enables higher resolution monitors, including recently announced 5K monitors (with pixel resolutions of 5120 x 2880) using a single DisplayPort cable without the use of compression. It will also enable higher resolutions when driving multiple monitors through a single connection using DisplayPort's Multi-Stream feature, such as the use of two 4K UHD monitors, each with a pixel resolution of 3840 x 2160, when using VESA Coordinated Video Timing.

DisplayPort 1.3 continues to support video conversion to VGA, DVI and HDMI. DisplayPort 1.3 adds support for HDCP 2.2 and HDMI 2.0 with CEC (Consumer Electronics Control), which enhances DisplayPort's utility for television applications, including 4K video with copy protection. The new standard adds support for the 4:2:0 pixel structure, a video format commonly used on consumer digital television interfaces, which enables support for future 8K x 4K displays.

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DisplayPort 1.3 also enhances DisplayPort's value for multi-function interfaces that combine data transport, A/V transport and other capabilities on a single cable. It further refines protocols that enable DisplayPort to share a single cable with other data types. With its higher 8.1 Gbps per-lane link rate, DisplayPort 1.3 can support a single UHD monitor with 60Hz refresh and 24-bit color over two lanes, while assigning the remaining two lanes to increase capacity for alternate data types, such as SuperSpeed USB data, as allowed in DockPort. DisplayPort is the A/V transport standard used by DockPort, Thunderbolt and other wired and wireless multi-function interface standards.

While becoming a mainstream video standard, DisplayPort continues to be at the cutting edge of A/V transport, said VESA Board of Directors Chair Alan Kobayashi, Fellow & Executive R&D Management for DisplayPort Group at MegaChips Technology America. These new enhancements to DisplayPort will facilitate both higher resolution displays, as well as easier integration of DisplayPort into multi-protocol data transports, which will satisfy consumer's desire for simplicity and ease-of-use.

The DisplayPort standard is offered to VESA members without any license fee. For more information about DisplayPort, please visit http://www.displayport.org or connect with us on YouTube.

Source: VESA

Dell resolves to have the most pixels ever; meet 5120 x 2880 aka 5K

Subject: Displays | September 4, 2014 - 07:49 PM |
Tagged: dell, 5120 x 2880, 5k, UltraSharp 27 Ultra HD 5K

That's right, Dell is releasing the Dell UltraSharp 27 Ultra HD 5K Monitor with a resolution of 5120 x 2880 for a mere $2500 just in time for Christmas.  That is just under 6.5 million more pixels than 4k which is an impressive jump and should look very interesting on a 27" display!

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While we may not have TV content to justify this resolution gamers with extreme GPUs should be able to take advantage of it as soon as it is released. You will probably be able to turn your anti-aliasing settings down with pixels that small.  It will also have 16W integrated Harmon Kardon speakers and quite likely a few USB ports.  Surround setups are going to need every PCIe lane you can toss at it though, good thing those 295X2's are on sale right now!  They've also added some information about their 4K displays here.

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Source: Dell

PCPer Live! Recap - NVIDIA G-Sync Surround Demo and Q&A

Subject: Graphics Cards, Displays | August 22, 2014 - 08:05 PM |
Tagged: video, gsync, g-sync, tom petersen, nvidia, geforce

Earlier today we had NVIDIA's Tom Petersen in studio to discuss the retail availability of G-Sync monitors as well as to get hands on with a set of three ASUS ROG Swift PG278Q monitors running in G-Sync Surround! It was truly an impressive sight and if you missed any of it, you can catch the entire replay right here.

Even if seeing the ASUS PG278Q monitor again doesn't interest you (we have our full review of the monitor right here), you won't want to miss the very detailed Q&A that occurs, answering quite a few reader questions about the technology. Covered items include:

  • Potential added latency of G-Sync
  • Future needs for multiple DP connections on GeForce GPUs
  • Upcoming 4K and 1080p G-Sync panels
  • Can G-Sync Surround work through an MST Hub?
  • What happens to G-Sync when the frame rate exceeds the panel refresh rate? Or drops below minimum refresh rate?
  • What does that memory on the G-Sync module actually do??
  • A demo of the new NVIDIA SHIELD Tablet capabilities
  • A whole lot more!

Another big thank you to NVIDIA and Tom Petersen for stopping out our way and for spending the time to discuss these topics with our readers. Stay tuned here at PC Perspective as we will have more thoughts and reactions to G-Sync Surround very soon!!

NVIDIA Live Stream: We Want Your Questions!

Subject: Graphics Cards, Displays, Mobile | August 21, 2014 - 05:23 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, video, live, shield, shield tablet, g-sync, gsync, tom petersen

Tomorrow at 12pm EDT / 9am PDT, NVIDIA's Tom Petersen will be stopping by the PC Perspective office to discuss some topics of interest. There has been no lack of topics floating around the world of graphics card, displays, refresh rates and tablets recently and I expect the show tomorrow to be incredibly interesting and educational.

On hand we'll be doing demonstrations of G-Sync Surround (3 panels!) with the ASUS ROG Swift PG278Q display (our review here) and also show off the SHIELD Tablet (we have a review of that too) with some multiplayer action. If you thought the experience with a single G-Sync monitor was impressive, you will want to hear what a set of three of them can be like.

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NVIDIA Live Stream with Tom Petersen

9am PT / 12pm ET - August 22nd

PC Perspective Live! Page

The topic list is going to include (but not limited to):

  • ASUS PG278Q G-Sync monitor
  • G-Sync availability and pricing
  • G-Sync Surround setup, use and requirements
  • Technical issues surrounding G-Sync: latency, buffers, etc.
  • Comparisons of G-Sync to Adaptive Sync
  • SHIELD Tablet game play
  • Altoids?

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But we want your questions! Do you have burning issues that you think need to be addressed by Tom and the NVIDIA team about G-Sync, FreeSync, GameWorks, Tegra, tablets, GPUs and more? Nothing is off limits here, though obviously Tom may be cagey on future announcements. Please use the comments section on this news post below (registration not required) to ask your questions and we can organize them before the event tomorrow. We MIGHT even be able to come up with a couple of prizes to giveaway for live viewers as well...

See you tomorrow!!

Richard Huddy Discusses FreeSync Availability Timeframes

Subject: General Tech, Displays | August 14, 2014 - 04:59 PM |
Tagged: amd, freesync, g-sync, Siggraph, siggraph 2014

At SIGGRAPH, Richard Huddy of AMD announced the release windows of FreeSync, their adaptive refresh rate technology, to The Tech Report. Compatible monitors will begin sampling "as early as" September. Actual products are expected to ship to consumers in early 2015. Apparently, more than one display vendor is working on support, although names and vendor-specific release windows are unannounced.

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As for cost of implementation, Richard Huddy believes that the added cost should be no more than $10-20 USD (to the manufacturer). Of course, the final price to end-users cannot be derived from this - that depends on how quickly the display vendor expects to sell product, profit margins, their willingness to push new technology, competition, and so forth.

If you want to take full advantage of FreeSync, you will need a compatible GPU (look for "gaming" support in AMD's official FreeSync compatibility list). All future AMD GPUs are expected to support the technology.

Source: Tech Report

G-SYNC is sweet but far from free

Subject: Displays | August 12, 2014 - 03:36 PM |
Tagged: asus, g-sync, geforce, gsync, nvidia, pg278q, Republic of Gamers, ROG, swift, video

Ryan was not the only one to test the ASUS ROG Swift PG278Q G-Sync monitor, Overclockers Club also received a model to test out.  Their impressions of the 27" 2560 x 1440 TN panel were very similar, once they saw this monitor in action going back to their 30-inch 60Hz IPS monitor was not as enjoyable as once it was.  The only bad thing they could say about the display was the MSRP, $800 is steep for any monitor and makes it rather difficult to even consider getting two or more of them for a multiple display system.

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”When you get down to it, the facts are that even with a TN panel being used for the high refresh rate, the ASUS ROG Swift PG278Q G-Sync monitor delivers great picture quality and truly impressive gaming. I could go on all day long about how smooth each of the games played while testing this monitor, but ultimately not be able to show you without having you sit at the desk with me. No stuttering, no tearing, no lag; it's like getting that new car and having all the sales hype end up being right on the money. When I flip back and forth between my 60Hz monitor and the PC278Q, its like a night and day experience.”

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

AMD Releases FreeSync Information as a FAQ

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards, Displays | July 29, 2014 - 09:02 PM |
Tagged: vesa, nvidia, g-sync, freesync, DisplayPort, amd

Dynamic refresh rates have two main purposes: save power by only forcing the monitor to refresh when a new frame is available, and increase animation smoothness by synchronizing to draw rates (rather than "catching the next bus" at 16.67ms, on the 16.67ms, for 60 Hz monitors). Mobile devices prefer the former, while PC gamers are interested in the latter.

Obviously, the video camera nullifies the effect.

NVIDIA was first to make this public with G-Sync. AMD responded with FreeSync, starting with a proposal that was later ratified by VESA as DisplayPort Adaptive-Sync. AMD, then, took up "Project FreeSync" as an AMD "hardware/software solution" to make use of DisplayPort Adaptive-Sync in a way that benefits PC gamers.

Today's news is that AMD has just released an FAQ which explains the standard much more thoroughly than they have in the past. For instance, it clarifies the distinction between DisplayPort Adaptive-Sync and Project FreeSync. Prior to the FAQ, I thought that FreeSync became DisplayPort Adaptive-Sync, and that was that. Now, it is sounding a bit more proprietary, just built upon an open, VESA standard.

If interested, check out the FAQ at AMD's website.

Source: AMD

Club 3D launches Worlds First USB 3.0 to 4K Graphics Adapter

Subject: General Tech, Displays, Mobile | July 15, 2014 - 05:39 PM |
Tagged: displaylink, club 3d, 4k

Why would you want a USB 3.0 4K display adapter you might ask?  Perhaps you have an ultrabook with limited display outputs that do not output in 4K resolution but somehow you managed to get your hands on a 4K display for work or leisure and have a need for the full resolution.  Club 3D now has a family of USB adapters for you, the CSV-2302 USB 3.0 to DisplayPort 4K, CSV-2301 USB 3.0 to DisplayPort 1600p and the CSV-2300D USB 3.0 to DVI-I graphics adapters.  This is the first implementation of the DisplayLink DL-5500 chipset and it does indeed support 10bit colour if your display can handle it.

The MSRP for this device when it starts to ship in about 2 weeks will be ~$142.

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Club 3D officially launches the next generation of USB 3.0 Graphics adapters capable of outputting high resolutions to DVI-I (2048x 1152p), DisplayPort (2560x 1600p) and the world’s first USB 3.0 to DisplayPort Graphics (CSV-2302) adapter which supports 4K or Ultra High Definition resolution at 3840x 2160p.

The Universal Serial Bus (USB) Port of a desktop computer or notebook is multifunctional and can be used to connect a large variety of (storage) devices, keyboards, mice and and other peripherals like monitors. Back in 2011, Club 3D introduced its first SenseVision USB Graphics adapters. These small external graphics adapters can be used to connect a DVI or HDMI monitor to the USB 2.0 output of a Desktop Computer or Notebook and create a multi screen setup.

The SenseVision USB adapters proved to be very successful across the globe! Not only with travelers but also in (semi) professional environments where more monitors mean more productivity.

The new Club 3D USB 3.0 Graphics adapters are fully ‘Plug and Display’ certified and the USB 3.0 to 4K Graphics Adapter (CSV-2302) is the very first to use the brand new DisplayLink DL-5500 chipset enabling 4K Ultra High Definition output to DisplayPort enabled 4K monitors at 30Hz. The Club 3D USB 3.0 to 4K Graphics Adapter (CSV-2302) is the first device available worldwide with the revolutionary new DisplayLink SoC implemented.

This Graphics adapter uses little resources of your system so it won’t affect performance ensuring at the same time a great image quality. It’s the ideal solution for anyone wanting to expand desktop space in order to use multiple programs simultaneously.

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Features:

  • 3840x2160 output at 30Hz
  • Backwards compatible with QHD and HD monitors
  • DP 1.2 interface (DisplayPort)
  • HDCP 2.0 for protected video playback
  • Integrated DisplayPort Audio

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Source: Club 3D

Oculus Rift Shipments Suspended to China

Subject: General Tech, Displays | July 5, 2014 - 04:11 AM |
Tagged: oculus vr, oculus rift, Oculus

The popular VR headset development kit, Oculus Rift DK2, is no longer available for order in China. The reason, according to their subreddit, is due to "extreme reseller purchases". In other words, because too many were purchased with the intention of selling them at a markup. They, then, ask enthusiasts to wait for the consumer version. These are for developers to develop.

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Reselling product happens frequently. You see it at big sales, when a retailer sells product near (or under) cost to lure people into their stores. Unless they have a quantity-per-purchase limit, that is enforced, you will see the occasional person buying obscene amounts. Some will even tell the cashier that they intend on reselling it elsewhere.

Oculus is "looking into alternative ways to make sure that our development kits are getting into legitimate developer hands in China". Also, they claim to have not canceled all orders in China., because, "that would be messed up".

Yes, Oculus, that would be.

The Oculus Rift DK2 is still available in the other regions.

Seiki Announces 28-in, 32-in and 40-in 4K Ultra HD Monitors with HDMI 2.0 and DisplayPort 1.3

Subject: Displays | June 24, 2014 - 03:05 PM |
Tagged: UHD, seiki, 4k, 40U4SEP-G02, 3840x2160, 32U4SEP-G02, 28U4SEP-G02

An interesting press release found its way into my inbox just now that announces a new competitor to the world of 4K monitors. Seiki, made famous recently for its line of incredibly low cost 4K TVs that really started the 4K trend for consumers and PC gamers, is building a set of three professional series 4K monitors for release early next year with some damned impressive specifications.

Though you can find the 50-in Seiki SE50UY04 for just $799 on Amazon and the 39-in SE39UY04 for only $469, these are televisions with somewhat limited 30 Hz refresh rates. The new products that Seiki is showing for the first time at CE Week Exhibits and Conferences in New York City do not have any of these limitations though and instead boast one of the most complete list of specifications I have seen on a monitor.

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Seiki SE39UY04 4K Television

Seiki will introduce three different sizes including a 28-in (28U4SEP-G02), 32-in (32U4SEP-G02) and 40-in (40U4SEP-G02) offering with the following specs:

  • Vertical Alignment (VA) LED panel technology with 3,840 by 2,160 4K Ultra HD
    resolution
  • 12-bit color processing and 14-bit gamma mode
  • HDMI 2.0, DisplayPort 1.3, MHL 3.0, DVI and VGA standards display connections
  • Picture-by-picture (x4) and daisy chain mode
  • USB 3.0 hub (1 upstream and 2 downstream)
  • VESA-compliant adjustable monitor stand with quick release

I am still waiting for confirmation on the panel type quality (more like TN or more like IPS, etc.) but the list of specifications here offers a glimpse of what to expect. (Vetical Aligned panels should be pretty damned good.) 12-bit color and 14-bit gamma indicate that this display will be built for the professional and creative designer at heart. Support for upcoming standards like HDMI 2.0 and Displayport 1.3 should tell you that the monitors won't be shipping for a while (Q1 2015 I'm told) but when you have them they will be able to push 4K at 60 Hz without issue.

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The quad PiP mode could be really cool if it works as I suspect - four different HDMI inputs allow for four unique unscaled images on the panel at the same time. This could be great for multi-display uses where consumers can utilize a set of four 20-in (effective) 1080p panels without a bezel. We are already drooling over the possibilities of that here for our test setups...

So while I am excited about the prospect of these monitors, we don't yet know the pricing. If these are high quality IPS displays you can expect them to be quite expensive. But Seiki is known for building great displays at a low cost, so perhaps the company will be able to do so once again and surprise us all in time for CES next year.

You can find the full press release by looking after the news break!

Now on Amazon: 1TB Samsung 840 EVO SSD for $399, ASUS PB287Q 4K for $649

Subject: General Tech, Displays, Storage | June 19, 2014 - 03:56 PM |
Tagged: Samsung, ssd, 840 evo, 1TB, amazon, pb287q, asus, 4k

A couple of really nice Amazon picks hit my email box today and I thought they were worth posting for our readers as well.

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1TB Samsung 840 EVO for $399

First, and clearly the most exciting: the 1TB version of the Samsung 840 EVO SSD is now selling for just $399. That comes in at $0.399/GB, which is actually better than the cost per GB of the Crucial MX100 that launched this month. If you haven't picked up an SSD that is big enough to hold all your games, this is the perfect opportunity!

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ASUS PB287Q 4K 28-in monitor for $649

Also, after our review went up at the end of May, the 4K ASUS PB287Q 28-in monitor is finally up for sale on Amazon for $649 with a shipping date of July 1st. If you think you might be interested in the universe of gaming at 4K, now is a great time to jump in.

Thanks for supporting PC Perspective!

This Wacom "Cintiq" Really Is Based on an Intuos

Subject: General Tech, Displays | June 8, 2014 - 05:09 PM |
Tagged: wacom, Cintiq, Intuos, hack

A couple of years ago, you might remember my review of the Wacom Cintiq 22HD. It was not a review unit. I was originally saving for the Cintiq 24HD until the 22HD and the 24HD Touch were announced. At that point, I was making decision whether to upgrade to the 24HD with a touchscreen for Windows 8 development, or save some money and get the 22HD. If you have read my many editorials on Windows Store certification requirements, you might guess that, at least I believe, I made the right decision.

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Image Credit: Hack a Day

This purchase was actually the second graphics tablet that I owned. Years earlier, I purchased an Adesso CyberTablet 12000 but had problems with drawing in one location and seeing the results in another. I, then, transitioned to scanning pencil-and-paper and inking/filling them with a mouse. It was at that point that I took a gamble on a Wacom Cintiq.

Why am I telling this story? Wacom Cintiqs are based on the same technology as their Intuos tablets, even down to pen compatibility, with a display built in. Well, at Hack a Day, one of their clever readers decided to make their own Cintiq out of what appears to be a Wacom Intuos3 A5. Basically, he fit a replacement 9.7-inch, 2048x1536 display, designed for Retina iPads and similar tablets, behind the touch sensor. It apparently worked without much fuss.

You can find Wacom Intuos3 6 x 8-inch pen tablets for about 120-150$ used. You can also find a 9.7-inch 2048x1536 panel and the other necessary hardware for about $70. While it is not an exact replacement for a Wacom Cintiq, it is the best you will do for under $250 (or even under $900).

Source: Hack a Day