AOC Will Show Off USB Powered 22 Inch LED Monitor At CES

Subject: Displays | January 5, 2012 - 10:49 AM |
Tagged: monitor, led, display, CES, AOC, 1080p

CES, the Consumer Electronics Show, is not until next week, but the tsunami of information and products that is sure to ensue has already started to rise in the form of leaks and teaser announcements. First off today is an announcement by AOC on a product that they will be showing off at CES. According to Maximum PC, the monitor, dubbed the e2251Fwu, will be pretty impressive by USB monitor standards.

AOC.jpg

Specifically, the monitor will be a 22 inch, LED back-lit monitor powered and connected to the PC for video via USB. It is HDCP compatible, sports a 1920x1080 resolution, 5ms response time, and 250 cd/m2 (candela per square metre) brightness, The monitor claims a 20,000,000:1 dynamic contrast ratio, though comparing contrast ratios isn't very reliable (but that's another story).  Unfortuantely, I wasn't able to dig up much more information from around the web.  It will be interesting to see just how much latency the USB connection will add and whether it will be close to the panel's 5ms response time.

Further, the monitor is slated to be available in February for just under 200 bucks. For those of you that have tried out USB connected displays, how well do they work as secondary monitors?

PC Perspective's CES 2012 coverage is sponsored by MSI Computer

Source: Maximum PC

Thin is in for Dell displays; too bad they aren't referring to the bezel

Subject: Displays | January 4, 2012 - 05:14 PM |
Tagged: dell, S2330MX, 23, tn led

The Dell S2330MX 23" LED monitor is advertised as a thin display but not in the dimensions most people hope.  The screen body its self is a hair under 10mm thick which significantly reduces its footprint on your desk.  Unfortunately for you multi-monitor gamers out there the bezel remains the same size and will interfere with your view.  On the plus side, Hardware Canucks found it for sale for under $200 which makes it quite a good deal for a thin LED monitor.  On the other hand, as you might guess from that low price this is a TN based display and apparently not a particularly good example as they saw evidence of ghosting and frustrating colour quality issues.

HWC_dells2330mx.jpg

"When it comes to consumer electronics, thin is in and Dell is leading the way with their new svelte S2330MX monitor. At just 9.9mm thick it will likely be the center of attention but on paper it also boasts some great specifications as well: an efficient LED panel, full HD resolution, a great price and response times of 2ms. It sure sounds like the 2330MX has what it takes to compete with the competition but there's more to this monitor than what first meets the eye."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

 

The EIZO DuraVision FDH3601 is a 4k x 2k Display, and We Want It

Subject: Displays | December 18, 2011 - 11:44 PM |
Tagged: eizo, 4k, FDH3601

I have to admit to you all, there isn't much in the world of computer hardware that I really really want at any given time.  Sure, there are new graphics cards like the pending AMD Radeon HD 7000 series and new CPUs like Intel's Sandy Bridge-E, but in truth, after more than a decade of seeing hardware releases, I pretty much know what to expect.

Imagine my surprise (and my wife's disappointment) when I found an incredibly gorgeous monitor that I simply must have, but is sadled with a ~$30,000  price tag. 

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You are looking at the EIZO DuraVision FDH3601 - a monitor with a resolution of 4096 x 2160 with a diagonal length of 36-in.  That equates to a pixel density of 128.6 PPI (pixels per inch) compared to your standard 24-in 1080p monitor with a PPI of 91.7. 

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At a recent event I got to have some hands on time with one of these badass monitors and I have to say I was incredibly impressed with the image quality it provided.  It was running Dirt 3 at the native 4096x2160 resolution and the game has never looked as crisp as it did then.  While it didn't eliminate it, this kind of resolution would really make a dent in the need for higher quality AA algorithms. 

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Here you can see Windows 7 running at the same resolution...

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To connect this monitor to any modern graphics hardware on your PC it requires a pair of dual-link DVI connections or a pair of DisplayPort connections in order to have enough bandwidth for peak refresh rates.  The monitor is definitely not a thin device but for being one of the first 4K displays available to consumers, we'll gladly accept the depth. 

If you want drool over these specs as well, you can head over to the EIZO website.  Alternatively, if you would like to purchase one as a holiday gift for me, just send me an email and I'll give you my address!!

Source: EIZO

Apple May Bring High Pixel Density Displays To MacBook Pro Notebooks

Subject: Displays, Mobile | December 14, 2011 - 04:40 PM |
Tagged: mobile, macbook, apple

 Apple pulled off a four times increase in pixel density on it’s smartphone displays with the iPhone 4 which they dubbed the “Retina Display.” Meanwhile the company’s current 13” MacBook Pro is shackled to a 1280x800 display with an approximate pixel density of 116 pixels per inch. The low resolution (especially vertically) can make reading web pages or working with large documents a hassle as it involves quite a bit of scrolling up and down. New rumors; however, suggest that the Cupertino based company may be looking to step up the display resolution in the next iteration of the MacBook lineup. Allegedly, Digitimes has heard from “sources in the upstream supply chain” that the displays will have as high as a 2880x1800 resolution (and an approximate 261.25 PPI). Pretty impressive for a 13” display!

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The current MBP

Whether we will actually see new MacBook models release with such a display remains to be seen; however, it would certainly be a welcomed move as the computer display innovation market has been rather stagnant for the past few years, even going so far as to go backwards in ~24” monitors from 1200 vertical pixels to the now standard 1920x1080 resolution. Perhaps this move by Apple will entice other monitor manufacturers to step up their game and bring 4K gaming to the PC, eventually. Heck, while we are on the topic of monitor tech traveling laterally instead of forward, what ever happened to that curved display from Alienware? Personally, I’m rooting for Apple on this one as the monitor market could use a wake up call!

Source: Tech Report

HD Projectors are fun, 3D HD projectors more so

Subject: Displays | December 7, 2011 - 02:40 PM |
Tagged: 3d display, projector, 1080p, optima, optima hd33

In the interests of dispensing with the bad news first, buying an Optima HD33 3D projector will set you back $1500 and does not come with glasses.  On the other hand, thanks to the Texas Instruments 1080p DLP chipset you get full HD resolution image of up to 300" (aka 25') at 1800 ANSI Lumens.  It is active 3D so the projector ships with an RF emitter for the necessary 3D glasses, which are battery powered.  Techware Labs found that the batteries would last about 2 hours before they started to show problems, at that point requiring a 30 minute recharge time over a USB cable.  It supports all HDMI 1.4a mandatory 3D formats, so you have your choice of 3D glasses to purchase which is good as the projector does not ship with 3D glasses in the box.  Optoma sells the BG-ZD101 DLP Link 3D Glasses separately for about $75 each.

TWL_optoma-hd33-37.jpg

Didn't I see this in a recent game sequel?

"Optoma's HD33 projector which is a full 3D 1080P projector gets reviewed by TechwareLabs. Through a full 90 day review we were very impressed with the Optoma HD33 projector and were very reluctant to ship it back. The Optoma is a very well designed, very bright and sharp projection. The very simple option and use made the setup and usage ever so simple. All you need is a wall big enough to project on and 3D content."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

 

After a few straight days of Skyrim some anti-eyestrain glasses are highly recommended

Subject: Displays | November 18, 2011 - 01:12 PM |
Tagged: gunnar, glasses, eye strain

This post over at The Tech Report starts by describing a situation that anyone reading this familar with, how staring at a PC for 8+ hours a day takes a toll on your eyes.  So, is it possible that the Gunnar Optiks Computer Glasses could save you some eye ache?  It certainly sounds like it from the positive comments these glasses garnered in the review, by a reviewer that is not used to wearing any glasses at all.  They are intended for the long haul, as your eyes will need a bit of time to adjust to the glasses, so you won't notice anything during a quick 5 minute email session you might find your eyes much happier after the 5th hour of gaming.  As well, The Tech Report warns against using these glasses with Photoshop as the yellow tint to the glasses will have an effect on the colours you perceive.  Shame about the logo as well.

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"Does staring at a computer screen for hours on end strain your eyes and give you headaches? Gunnar's computer glasses might help. TR's David Morgan tries on a pair in his latest blog post, with surprising results."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

 

Dell's new 24" UltraSharp IPS display

Subject: Displays | October 27, 2011 - 03:28 PM |
Tagged: dell, UltraSharp U2412M, 24”, ips display

IPS panels have tended to be expensive ino the past but as the technology has matured the prices have been going down and quality has been increasing.  At Hardware Canucks you can see an example of this in the 1920x1200 24" Dell UltraSharp U2412M.  As this is a new generation IPS display, its response time comes close to a TN's at 6ms although the price of just under $400 is not quite in the ballpark of a TN monitor.  The overall conclusion was good, as the colours and viewing angle met expectations though there was some evidence of ghosting in both movies and gaming thanks to the slow gray to gray latency.  Not enough to sour those Beavers; they think its a Dam Good Value.

HWC_mfg_dell.jpg

"By offering a reasonably large, high quality 16:10 IPS panel at a price point which is infinitely more palatable than the U27 or U30 series, the U24s have always been considered a great value. The all new U2412M, hopes to continue this enviable tradition by offering exactly what first time professional consumers want, at a price which undercuts many other IPS-based offerings."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

 

Panel Self Refresh; a new way to save power

Subject: Displays | September 30, 2011 - 01:27 PM |
Tagged: mobile, low power, panel self refresh

The idea behind Panel Self Refresh is a sound one, when displaying static images there is no need for the GPU portion of your processor to be refreshing it at full speed.  If you simply leave the displayed image in the frame buffer you can turn off the GPU and get significant power savings.  It will not help when you are streaming media but if you are reading emails or a pdf file or even browsing pictures, you should see some extension to the life of your battery.  Hardware Secrets describes the technology in their article here.

imageview.jpg

"Manufacturers are always looking for innovative ways to save battery life on laptops. With the embedded DisplayPort 1.3 interface (eDP 1.3), VESA, the Video Standards Association behind DisplayPort, came up with a new idea, the Panel Self Refresh (PSR). Let's see how it works."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

 

HP Introduces Sub-$200 IPS Monitor, Updates Other IPS Displays

Subject: Displays | September 14, 2011 - 11:19 AM |
Tagged: ips monitor, ips display, hp monitor, hp ips, hp display, hp

IPS displays were once a highly sought but also relatively rare consumer product. Only Dell and Apple have consistently offered consumer displays featuring the technology. Other companies, such as NEC, have built such products with a focus on the office rather than the home.

That’s been changing, however, as the overall price of displays continues to stay low and consumer expectations for display quality are impacted by the use of smartphones and tablets. ASUS and LG now have small affordable IPS displays on the market, and HP is joining the crowd with its updated line of ZR-Series “performance displays.”

ZR2040w_Angle Left.jpg

HP has announced 20”, 21.5”, 24” and 27” models. The ZR2040w, the smallest of the new entries, will debut with an impressively modest price tag of $189 and resolution of 1600x900. Connectivity options include DisplayPort, DVI and VGA. Available today from HP.com, it is the second least expensive IPS monitor on the market, trailing just behind the $179 ASUS ML239H. This should be an awesome development for enthusiasts in need of a small, high-quality display, particularly if the quality is on par with HP’s larger products.

Resolution of the ZR-Series goes up in size with the 21.5”, 24” and 27” products offering a resolution of 1920x1080, 1920x1200 and 2560x1440, respectively. MSRP is $289, $425 and $729, respectively.

The 22” and 24” displays are updates to models previously available in the United States. The updated versions announced today are similar to their predecessors in both specifications and price, with the exception of the HDMI port, which wasn’t previously included. If it were my money, I’d go for the ZR2440w – the ZR24w was excellent, and the HDMI port on the new model makes it ready for use with a wider variety of video cards.

ZR2040w_Back.jpg

Also included in this announcement is the HP Compaq LE2202x, a 21.5” LED backlit monitor. While it offers a resolution of 1920x1080, it does not feature IPS technology. It also lacks HDMI, which would seem to indicate that it leans towards use in an office environment.'

Source: HP

 

Source: HP

Viewsonic attempts to entice you to buy their 3D display

Subject: Displays | September 13, 2011 - 01:19 PM |
Tagged: viewsonic, 3d display, V3D245

The Viewsonic V3D245 is a 24" LED monitor with a 1080p resolution that will let you play in 3D without needing to pick up extra peripherals.  The display will work equally well with both PCs and consoles and most importantly the active glasses are included with the monitor.  You provide the signal and the display will give you 3D gaming.  Drop by Ars Technica for a closer look.

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"That being said, ViewSonic wants to make you a deal. If you give them $500, they'll give you a 24" monitor for your PC and gaming consoles that does 3D like a champ. There is nothing extra to hook up, nothing to be added; it's an all-in-one solution that does 3D as well as anything I've seen on the market. At $500, this display isn't cheap, but the quality is such that you'll be happy about spending the money."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

Source: Ars Technica

Need a 3D display, mon? Try Zalman's Trimon

Subject: Displays | August 16, 2011 - 12:14 PM |
Tagged: zalman, 3d display

The Zalman Trimon ZM-M240W is the latest 3D display from a company once best known for pretty heatsinks.  They've preferred using passive glasses to create the illusion of depth on their monitors, something which attracts people who do not want to invest around $100 in a pair of active shutter glasses that may or may not work with some TVs and possibly give you a headache for the effort of trying.  X-bit Labs certainly approved of both the pricing and the lack of flicker from Zalman's new Trimon but pointed out that there are serious drawbacks in the viewing angle with passive glasses.  Check out their full review here.

xalman_3d_TV.jpg

"Zalman continues on their own unique path releasing 3D monitors bundled with inexpensive and non-flickering passive glasses. They have indisputable strengths as well as bottlenecks. Read our review to find out more."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

Source: X-Bit Labs

New Solar Cell Enhanced LCDs Could Improve Mobile Device Battery Life

Subject: Displays, Mobile | August 12, 2011 - 04:51 AM |
Tagged: solar cell, mobile, lcd, display

According to Ars Technica, researchers at UCLA announced on Tuesday a new LCD screen containing photovoltaic cells that promises to reduce back-light energy waste and improve battery life on mobile devices.

n900.jpg

My N900 eats up battery with an hour of Angry Birds, but can go for two days with the display off. Where's my happy medium? 

The researchers have placed what they are calling polarizing organic photovoltaics inside the LCDs in such a way that light that is normally filtered out and blocked in areas to create the displayed images can now be (mostly) recovered. While the process does not result in 100% reclamation of energy due to energy loss during the conversion process(es) and heat given off by the back-light, in a mobile device any amount of energy that can be recovered is desirable. Ars Technica states that up to 90% of a battery’s power is used to power the back-light of the display. Further, of that percentage, up to 75% is lost to the polarizing layers. By infusing the polarizing layer with photovoltaic cells and reclaiming as much of the otherwise wasted light as possible, battery life could be dramatically extended.

Mobile devices are getting beefier multi-core processors and graphics chips, numerous wireless radio connections (4G, WiFi, Bluetooth), and large power hungry displays; however, battery technology advancements have been rather stagnant and flat. As a result of this, having to make processors, displays, and other components as efficient as possible to make up the difference of battery technology not keeping up with other advancements, interesting tweaks like the photovoltaic infused displays become that much more important.

Whether this particular technology will catch on and work as well as they claim remains to be seen; however it is nonetheless an interesting experiment. More data on the researchers’ project will be published in the Advanced Materials journal in September 2011. What are your thoughts on the idea?

Source: Ars Technica

ViewSonic Drives Display Innovation with New 3D Vision LED Monitor

Subject: Displays | August 1, 2011 - 01:11 PM |
Tagged: led lcd, 3d display

WALNUT, Calif. – August 1, 2011 – ViewSonic Corp., a leading global provider of computing, consumer electronics and communications solutions, today continues its leadership in display innovation with the new V3D245 – a 24-inch 3D, full HD (1080p) LED monitor that includes a built-in NVIDIA 3D Vision wireless emitter and NVIDIA 3D Vision glasses.

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Combining world-leading LED technology with extraordinary power-saving performance, this 24-inch (23.6-inch vis.) monitor offers a stunning 120Hz frame refresh rate and ultra-fast 2ms video response time, and HDMI 1.4 input making it ideal for delivering a truly immersive 2D and 3D entertainment and gaming experience. Paired with a 1920x1080 full HD resolution, 20,000,000:1 dynamic contrast ratio and 300 nits high brightness, users can expect great color accuracy and picture detail for unsurpassed 3D image quality.

The integrated NVIDIA 3D Vision wireless emitter gives users the flexibility to connect to an NVIDIA GeForce-equipped PC to play more than 550 3D games in full 1080p, 60 fps resolution, view 3D videos and photos, and stream 3D web content. Users could also choose to connect directly to the latest Blu-ray 3D players or PS3 consoles via the standard built-in HDMI 1.4 input. Additionally, the integrated two-watt SRS Premium Sound audio speakers provides consumers the ultimate multimedia entertainment display.

“Gamers, movie buffs and photo enthusiasts will love moving up to 3D. And there’s no better way to do so than with ViewSonic’s V3D245 3D monitor, with its built-in NVIDIA 3D Vision technology, which produces the most immersive and crystal clear 3D images,” said Phil Eisler, general manager of 3D Vision at NVIDIA. “Set-up is quick and easy. Simply connect the monitor to your NVIDIA GeForce graphics card, put on the included NVIDIA 3D Vision glasses, and start enjoying games, videos and photos in a whole new way.”

NVIDIA’s 3D Vision drivers support more than 550 video games in 3D, with more being continually added. In addition, 3DVisionLive.com hosts hundreds of 3D videos and thousands of 3D photos that can be seen with a free web browser and a 3D Vision system. YouTube also supports 3D Vision, with thousands of videos now available for viewing in stereoscopic 3D.

“Whether for work, play or media enjoyment, our new V3D245 monitor offers the highest level of compatibility with both PC- and console-based 3D content, and is ideal for delivering an incredible 3D experience,” said Erik Willey, LCD monitor and PC product marketing manager, ViewSonic. “By pairing our exclusive 120Hz, LED-based 3D technology with NVIDIA 3D Vision technology, we are able to deliver a new world-class level of performance that will shape the future of 3D gaming and entertainment.”

The V3D245 comes standard with ViewSonic’s strongest pixel performance guarantee and 3-year limited warranty. ViewSonic’s V3D245 3D monitor and included pair of NVIDIA 3D Vision active stereo 3D glasses and will be available in North America during mid-to-late August for an ESP of $499.

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Source: ViewSonic

More than just a monitor, Samsung's C27A750 27” LCD is a wireless station

Subject: Displays | July 26, 2011 - 02:58 PM |
Tagged: wireless, tn lcd, samsung C27A750, Samsung, 27

The Samsung C27A750 27” Central Station Wireless Monitor is a 27" 1080p TN LCD monitor which is intended to solve your wiring problems.  It sports HDMI and D-sub for video, along with a wireless USB 2.0 dongle but there are also a pair of USB 3.0 ports, a pair of USB 2.0 ports, a 3.5mm jack for speakers and a network port.  Essentially it mimics a multifunctional dock while also being a 27" monitor which can be connected wirelessly to a PC.  As positive as this multi-functional base sounds, Hardware Canucks were disappointed with its physical stability as the base is the same size as the 24" model.  Their testing revealed good points and bad points about the display and dock, perhaps the biggest being that you should not even consider gaming over the wireless connection.  As well, a 27" display at 1080p is not optimal but for use as a secondary display with a laptop, netbook or even smart phone the dock and wireless capabilities are impressive.

HWC_samsung_lcddock.jpg

"During this year's CES, Samsung debuted their Central Station technology which promised to combine an all in one connectivity and networking hub into a high performance monitor. This centralized approach will surely appeal to notebook, tablet and netbook users since it can expand screen real estate while eliminating the need to attach unwanted wires to an otherwise quick setup. One of the first products to feature Central Station technology is the C27A750 27” monitor."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

 

LG Unveils World's First Glasses-Free 3D LCD Display

Subject: Displays | July 16, 2011 - 10:54 AM |
Tagged: monitor, LG, lenticular display, 3d display, 3d

LG Electronics, maker of HD televisions, computer displays, and a myriad of consumer electronics devices unveiled a new glasses-free 3D monitor that claims to be the first display of its kind. Using a lenticular display and a built in webcam to automatically adjust the display by tracking eye movement in real time. Lenticular displays work by coating an otherwise 2D panel with an array of tiny lenses called lenticules that then direct light from the panel’s pixels into each eye. The brain then stitches the images together and interprets them as a 3D image. The passive 3D system (passive in the sense that active shutter glasses are not required) and eye tracking means that only one person will be able to experience the 3D effects at a time; however, that person will be able to view the image at a wider variety of viewing angles than otherwise possible without eye tracking.

D2000-500.jpg

The 20" inch panel has been dubbed the DX2000, and will retail in Korea this month for $1,200 USD according to a LG press release. A wider release to other markets are expected later in the year, and the display model will be known as the D2000.

Source: Cnet Asia

Still in the market for a 3D display? Samsung has a set for you

Subject: Displays | July 8, 2011 - 01:36 PM |
Tagged: Samsung, 3d display, tn lcd, 1080p

Since the 3D market is not confusing enough Samsung has decided to implement their own way of displaying 3D images using shutter glasses, which is incompatible with NVIDIA's glasses.  On the plus side, as long as you have Samsung's glasses you will be able to display 3D from any source with any semi-modern graphics card.  The SyncMaster SA950 is a 1080x1920 TN LCD with a very reflective finish and comes with stylish active shutter glasses powered by a single lithium disk battery.  X-bit Labs put on the goggles and tried the 3D experience from both 3D sources and using the onboard processor to make 3D visuals out of 2D sources, with mixed but fairly positive results.

xbt_SyncMaster_SA950.jpg

"This time we are going to talk about a new 27-inch 3D monitor from Samsung that uses its own proprietary technologies for 3D imaging that work without drivers or any other additional software."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

Source: X-Bit Labs

D-Link releases WiDi adapter

Subject: General Tech, Displays | June 20, 2011 - 04:03 AM |
Tagged: widi, D-Link

There are a lot of benefits of having a home theatre PC but still one major drawback: having the PC by the TV. Intel has worked hard to find a solution and released the specification under the name “WiDi”, a wireless display specification that lets you share your monitor with an HDTV attached to a wireless receiver box. D-Link has just recently launched their WiDi receiver in the US with Canada coming next month; will WiDi start picking up market share with more capable devices?

DHD-131_front.png

Why do network appliances these days look like pillows?

(Image from D-Link)

The D-Link MainStage (known as DHD-131 to its friends) has only a power cable to its name apart from your choice of video and audio connection to your TV or sound system. For choice of connection you have two video options and three audio options: on the video side you have HDMI for your high-resolution viewing and standard RCA for your standard definition devices; on the audio side you have optical audio or HDMI for surround and white and red RCA for stereo. Apart from a power button and a reset button that is the whole of this unit.

DHD-131_back.jpg

Plastic case with on/off butty. Baby got back shots.

(Image from D-Link)

One thing that typically holds back other implementations of WiDi that I have seen, and I assume this is no exception, is latency. The slight lag when controlling a media program or browsing a website is acceptable however it would really hold back the use of a PC as a console replacement unless the video card is directly connected to the TV which is a definite shame but to be expected given the bandwidths over WiFi that we are talking about. If you happen to be interested in this solution, however, it retails for just under 130$.

Source: HotHardware

The Next Generation is 3D HD SMARTBoards

Subject: General Tech, Displays | June 12, 2011 - 05:56 PM |
Tagged: SMART, 3d

SMART has been making interactive whiteboards for quite some time now. An interactive whiteboard is essentially a giant writing tablet similar to a Wacom. This tablet is also a projector screen which is often wall mounted but could be mounted on a cart. SMART Boards attach to PCs by USB and could attach to video and audio out if you purchase one with an attached projector and speakers rather than use your own. Recently SMART announced and released their fifth generation product line complete with a projector supporting HDMI input and active 3D technology.

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IT’S LIKE I CAN TOUCH YOU!

(Image by SMART Technologies)

While I can see this useful for companies that are doing 3D technology during their company, investor, and vendor meetings it seems a little bit unlikely that active 3D will appear in the classroom. It seems quite difficult for me to imagine twenty to forty students each with their own active shutter 3D glasses atop the investment of the 3D interactive whiteboard itself. Also while it might be to support the 3D functionality of the projector it seems quite odd to include HDMI functionality and barely exceed 720p resolution (1280x800) in your highest-end projector.

If an interactive whiteboard is in your interest but were holding out until you can pop things out at your audience the new SMART boards were available since May 25th in North America and May 30th internationally. Prices range between $3000 and $4000 US, computer not included. If you already have a digital whiteboard but want a 3D projector upgrade that will cost just north of 2000$.
Source: SMART

Is the InFocus 55" a wall tablet? Do you want it anyway?

Subject: General Tech, Displays, Systems | June 11, 2011 - 03:31 AM |
Tagged: wall tablet, InFocus

InFocus is branding their 55-inch touch-screen TV with Windows 7 embedded as a “Wall Tablet”. The writers down at HotHardware seem to take offense to a 55-inch device being called a tablet and I must agree. My duration working in high schools and acquiring an education degree grew me well acquainted with SMART boards and this product definitely recalls those memories much more vividly than my experience playing around with tablet devices.

The problem with touch screens in schools is that every screen is treated like one thereafter.

(Video from BusinessWire)

It is quite obvious that InFocus spent quite a large amount of time developing their user interface to dress up Windows 7 as a more whiteboard friendly operating system. Their interface has a custom file browser with annotation capabilities, a custom web browser, a digital whiteboard application, and a video conferencing solution that can interface with open protocols such as Google Talk and more proprietary ones such as Cisco. The unit itself has a 720p video camera and a screen resolution of 1920x1080 with multiple touch recognition, something that most (but not all) SMART boards are incapable of.

It is highly unlikely that you will have one of these $6000 devices in your house unless you happen to require it for professional reasons. For those in the education, training, research, or corporate management fields: a device like this could make your life much easier particularly if you were already considering installing a mass of SMART boards for this purpose. They are expected to ship to interested customers in July.

Source: HotHardware

Swap your displays CCFL with LEDs

Subject: Displays | May 31, 2011 - 12:09 PM |
Tagged: hack, mod, ccfl, led, repair

Over at Hack a Day is a video and project log of an industrious fellow whose digital picture frame backlight bit the biscuit.  Instead of buying a new one he removed the dead CCFL and replaced it with a six dollar LED strip instead of an expensive inverter or lamp for the CCFL.  The project is not easy, especially if you wish to attempt this on a full sized monitor but there are tips and tricks that should help you on your way in the full post.

CCFL_repair.png

"[Fileark] had the backlight on his digital picture frame go out one day. These are generally Cold Cathode Fluorescent Lamps which require an inverter to source the voltage necessary for proper operation. When they stop working, the inverter is usually to blame. Since that circuit is made up of pretty small surface mount circuitry, he decided to replace the backlight with LEDs rather than repair the inverter."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

Source: Hack a Day