Windows 8 gives a little more attention to multiple monitors. Oh look -- a feature for traditional PCs.

Subject: General Tech, Displays | May 24, 2012 - 08:22 PM |
Tagged: windows 8, multi monitor

PC Mag highlights enhanced support for multiple monitor systems in the upcoming Windows 8 Release Preview. It is like Microsoft has finally thrown a bone to the desktop and to a lesser extent, the laptop. Some features that were mentioned in the article have been around for a while, however.

If you have given the gift of a multiple monitor setup -- do not expect a take-backsies without a fight.

Chloe Albanesius of PC Mag wrote an article which outlines what enhanced support multiple monitor users will experience if they move to Windows 8. A refreshing suspend of the ctrl-alt-deleterious news. Or maybe Microsoft was just afraid of being attacked with vestigial display cables?

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Just think of the possibilities of per-monitor backgrounds… a shrine just for Josh...

The article opens with a description of the author’s triple monitor setup. Oddly enough my layout is very often an exact mirror image of her layout, horizontally. I would not be surprised if that choice was due to my left-handedness -- very amused, but not surprised.

Windows 8 will make it easy to load different backgrounds for each monitor but earlier versions were capable of that for as long as I could remember. The trick is to create a single very large background image in a program like Photoshop or The GIMP. This very large image must have the same dimensions as the sum of your monitor resolutions horizontally by the sum of your monitor resolutions vertically. The top left of that image is the top left of your “primary” monitor. Fill in the backgrounds wherever the desired monitor falls on that grid -- making sure to put whatever is above and to the left of the top left corner of the primary monitor at the extreme right and bottom. Set that background to “tiled” and you are set.

Notice how I never said that making it easier would be unwelcomed rather just that it was already possible.

The more important features include the ability to enable the taskbar on each monitor and customize how icons will appear for each display. That, combined with enabling corner context support for each monitor should help alleviate some of the juggling over real estate on the primary monitor.

You should be able to see all the changes for multiple monitor users in the upcoming Windows 8 Release Preview.

That is, of course, unless Microsoft ends up starting from scratch before they launch -- again.

Source: PC Mag

De-bezel your monitor, void your warranty and run the risk of killing your LCD ... but no bezels!

Subject: Displays | May 11, 2012 - 01:18 PM |
Tagged: DIY, Alienware OptX AW2310, mod

When EyeFinity and NVIDIA Surround first hit the market we were promised LCDs specifically designed to have tiny bezels so that your multiple monitor gaming experience would be enhanced.  These monitors are still few and far between and even if you track one down their scarcity guarantees a high price.  That is probably what prompted Tweaktown to pick up scraper and hacksaw and carve up their Alienware displays' bezels.  This is of course something to be done with the full knowledge that you may well destroy your monitor but if you want gaming like in the picture below you might have to risk it.

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"A step-by-step guide on how to de-bezel an Alienware AW2310 monitor and how they look in a three screen portrait setup."

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Source: Tweaktown

"Just" Picked Up: Datacolor Spyder4PRO

Subject: General Tech, Displays | May 4, 2012 - 05:18 PM |
Tagged: colorimeter, monitor

Just Delivered is a class of articles at PC Perspective where we share what crosses into our offices, labs, houses, or nearby unguarded front porches. Today we put up with none of that. Two days ago I got off my lazy butt long enough to drive to a store to purchase a Datacolor Spyder4PRO monitor calibration device. Sure, I could have walked but -- let’s not get crazy now.

Part of doing illustration work online involves knowing how it will be viewed by the masses. Everyone will view it somewhat differently due to more-than-slight variations in their displays.

Properly calibrating your monitor to what is considered convention is difficult and not something many users do. Hardware and software exist to measure your monitor and adjust your color profiles to match. Calibrated color profiles often lose brightness and vibrancy although they are not to look good -- they are designed to look consistent.

After a couple of years of off-and-on browsing web forums for opinions on which colorimeter is the best I realized that I would be just as far ahead with a random number generator. I eventually just went with the gut and chose the Datacolor Spyder4PRO.

Colorimeter.jpg

Of course on the way home an oncoming car entered my lane to pass a bus.

It almost served me right for not leaving the whole “going outside” thing to the mail people.

Out of the box, installation was quite simple. I did have one annoyance with inputting my serial number: apparently when you input your serial number and activate online they return to you your CD key. Correct me if I am wrong, but it seems like if I were to reinstall the application I could not use the serial number that is safe and sound with the unit but rather recall the key I was given just then. That seems like a very bad method to enforce DRM -- although let’s face it, I hate DRM regardless of its form -- but thankfully I have secure notes in LastPass for situations like these.

I calibrated the three monitors very easily. My primary monitor, the Samsung SyncMaster XL2370, required two calibrations to be properly set although I believe that was my fault. Now all three monitors quite closely align to one another and seem to work well for test images in color managed applications.

My one complaint about the product itself is that it has a suction cup mount, but no suction cup. Really -- your device is almost 200$ and you cheap out on a couple-cent suction cup? Where am I even supposed to find a suction cup that will fit it? I mean, it is possible that there was an error with my package although it was sealed. Maybe it was only for the Elite package?

Really a suction cup is not necessary anyway -- they provide a counterweight on the cable to have it hang from the top of your monitor… but it is not as stable as a suction cup.

Source: PCPer

MonMount's affordable triple display mount

Subject: Displays | April 26, 2012 - 01:30 PM |
Tagged: triple, monitor mount, mount, multi monitor, MonMount, LCD-1930 Triple

For just under $50 the MonMount LCD-1930 Triple LCD Monitor Stand gives you a way to mount three monitors of up to 22" to a desk, far less expensive than other mounts on the market.  It may look minimalist but the VESA mounts can rotate between portrait and landscape and can pivot both vertically and horizontally to allow you to perfectly align your monitors.  Legit Reviews did run into several small issues, from cables weren't quite long enough to the discovery that while the stand supports 22" displays, they cannot be more than 20" wide.  It is still a much cleaner and more stable solution than having your monitors sitting on your desk.

LR_1930b.jpg

"We were about to give up on an affordable triple monitor stand that had articulating arms for a sweet AMD Eyefinity or NVIDIA Surround gaming setup when we ran across the MonMount LCD-1930 Triple LCD Monitor Stand Desk Mount that costs just $48.88 plus shipping! Compared to the other three monitor stands on the market this one looks like a bargain! Read on to see what we think of this space saving mount!"

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

 

HP's inexpensive high resolution 27" display

Subject: Displays | April 5, 2012 - 03:49 PM |
Tagged: hp, 27, ZR2740w, ips display, led backlight

It may seem odd to refer to a $680 monitor as a really great deal but that is exactly what the HP ZR2740w is.  Finding a new 27" 2560x1440 IPS display with LED backlighting for under $1000 is well nigh impossible, even finding a used one for around $700 is a rare find.  HP has done what no other company has though, cutting costs by removing HDMI and speakers as well as not including an OSD. They did not skimp on the quality of the display however, with a very good response rate for an IPS display as well as a very good colour gamut.  AnandTech does warn you that the lack of OSD controls, having a colourometer to calibrate the monitor properly is very important.

anand_HP.jpg

"We finally have our first real affordable 27”, high resolution display on the market now, and it comes courtesy of HP. The HP ZR2740w is a 27” IPS panel with 2560x1440 resolution (16:9 aspect ratio) and an LED backlighting system. With a street price that comes in at $700 or below, what has HP done to be able to bring a high resolution display to the masses at a price well below other vendors? Thankfully, they provided me with a unit so I could evaluate it and see."

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Displays

 

Source: AnandTech

ASUS offers an all in one NVIDIA 3D display package

Subject: Displays | March 13, 2012 - 12:58 PM |
Tagged: VG278H, tn lcd, asus, 3d display, 27

For those who would like to take advantage of NVIDIA's 3D gaming technology, a good place to start is the ASUS VG278H 27" 3D display.  While it is $650 it comes with NVIDIA's 3D Vision 2 glasses and 3D LightBoost thanks to the LED back lighting.  In this case a TN monitor makes sense as it gives a quick response rate and the viewing angle matters less as your 3D glasses also have a very limited sweet spot.  Hardware Canucks did feel that 27" is a bit large for 1080p resolution but that is part of what keeps the price low compared to other 3D displays and they did notice crosstalk, a problem which plagues many 3D displays.  If you feel the need to game in 3D you could do worse than the ASUS VG278H.

HWC_mfg.jpg

"Being one of the first 120Hz capable 27" monitors, the ASUS VG278H caused a stir when it was first announced alongside NVIDIA’s 3D Vision 2. Even though it incorporates a TN panel and a resolution of only 1920 x 1080, its price is low enough to be tempting for anyone that wants stereoscopic capabilities without breaking the bank."

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Displays

 

A different way to extend your display

Subject: Displays | February 24, 2012 - 02:04 PM |
Tagged: sapphire, VID-2X, multi monitor

The Sapphire VID-2X offers you a new way to utilize multiple displays without needing a graphics card capable of powering a resolution of 3840x1200.  It can both clone and stretch your desktop and is Plug & Play with no software or drivers to install, simply plug it into a dual link DVI port and it is ready to go.  At an MSRP of $180 it is less expensive than an SLI or CrossFire solution though it is limited in performance by your GPU.  You might be able to stretch your game across three monitors but you might find performance suffers somewhat.  Instead you can consider this a way to get multiple monitors from a single NVIDIA GPU or a way to avoid an active DisplayPort adapter for a Radeon card.  HiTech Legion has several videos of the VID-2X in action which you should check out.

saapphire_vid-2x.jpg

"Sapphire's VID-2X is a plug and play compact device that was designed to extend your existing monitor into one large field of view, in effect, tricking the system and allowing you to add two additional monitors to your system from just one display port, be it a laptop, netbook, home computer, or office PC. The VID-2X from Sapphire accomplishes this without you having to install any software or drivers. In addition, the VID-2X will make use of the video card installed and, without using system resources, maintain a resolution or output in clone mode of up to 1920 x 1280. The VID-2X offers several connection options using your existing cable option of DVI, with cables included, and once installed, will double your field of view. The Sapphire VID-2X will also adapt to VGA or HDMI display ports with adapters you may have on hand with your existing system."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

 

Mobile Multiscreen computing from Sapphire

Subject: Displays | February 8, 2012 - 04:06 PM |
Tagged: sapphire, VID-2X

You are probably familiar with the Lenovo ThinkVision, an external monitor easily added to a laptop to give you multiple working screens.  Sapphire offers a similar product with a big twist, the VID-2X is a small self contained device which will allow you to connect two 1920x1200 or 1920x1080 monitors via DisplayPort, Thunderbolt, or Dual-link-DVI depending on the model you buy.  Instead of being forced to use a small external monitor the VID-2X allows you to choose the monitors you will output to, as well as either cloned or stretched displays which gives you a lot more flexibility.  You'll have to visit Overclockers Club to find out how well it works.

vid2x_right_side.jpg

"With many in the industry projecting a sharp decline of desktop PC sales over the next few years, an external portable solution for laptop and netbook users on the go may find it a product that will handily fit into their carrying case and very useful for sales presentations, or to just make their tasks easier with increased screen estate. The idea of reduced toggling between multiple open programs and applications is also very appealing as well. As an avid user of a multiscreen desktop setup, I can attest to how much more easy and enjoyable the access is in day to day computing, project management, and content creation software settings.This product would also seem to hit its stride in board rooms and businesses."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

 

A portable display for your PC or Mac, Lenovo's USB powered ThinkVision

Subject: Displays | January 24, 2012 - 02:00 PM |
Tagged: thinkvision, portable, monitor, Lenovo, display

You may remember Matt's review of the Lenovo ThinkVision LT1421 portable monitor from back in November, but if not it is time for a refresher from Legit Reviews.  It is a 14", 1366x768 display that uses a dual USB 2.0 connection, one for power and one to drive the display, so it gives you a very portable second screen for your laptop.  One discovery that Legit Reviews happened upon was Apple support; by grabbing drivers from DisplayLink, the company which designed the ThinkVision, you can use the ThinkVision on your MacBook.  Check out their full review here.

LR_lt1421_monitor.jpg

"The Lenovo ThinkVision LT1421 portable monitor is a great solution for someone that needs an additional monitor on the go. With an online price of $190.67 shipped it is not something you go out and by on a whim, but is affordable for those that need it. After installing the drivers, using the the ThinkVision LT1421 was as simple as plugging the monitor into a laptop with the two USB 2.0 cables and propping it up with its photo frame stand. You can then dial-in the display to look the very best by tilting the display to the desired angle and picking the right brightness level of the 16 available..."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

 

Sony Shelves OLED Tech, Brings Crystal LED TV To Bear Against OLED Competition

Subject: General Tech, Displays | January 9, 2012 - 09:50 PM |
Tagged: CES, sony, led, crystal led, oled, tv

While I read a few weeks ago that Sony would not be showing off any OLED TVs at CES, I was a bit saddened. The company was the first to bring a real OLED television one step above vaporware, even if it was only 11" and prohibitively expensive it was advancing the technology. Well, CES is here and Sony did not bring any OLED television to demo, much less bring to market this year. Fortunately, LG and Samsung have the OLED TVs covered. The question of how Sony plans to compete with the OLED competition seems to be in improved LED TV technology.

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Speaking of LED TV technology, while Sony did not bring an OLED TV to CES, they did bring a new LED TV that they claim is much improved over current LED back-lit televisions. They are calling this technology "Crystal LED," and it is powering a 55" prototype television at this years CES. The 55" television uses very small RGB (red, green, and blue) LEDs to create the picture. This is an important distinction as current "LED TVs" are really just LCD televisions with LEDs as the back-light; where the LEDs shine light through the LCD pixels to create the picture. This Sony prototype is an actual LED TV, not just a branding misnomer as the LED lights are what creates the picture and not just a light source.

According to Engadget, Sony claims their true LED TV is greatly improved over LED-back-lit LCDs and offers 3.5 times the contrast, a 1.5 times wider color gamut, and is 10 times faster than LCDs. Although these are Sony's numbers and should be taken with a grain of salt (until independent reviewers can verify), they at least seem reasonable and plausible. The contrast improvement and true blacks should be readily possible thanks to the panel tech being self emitting. If done right, it should come close to the contrast offered by OLEDs which share the self-emitting property. The ability to be 10 times faster than LCDs may be the most questionable number, but still not an outrageous claim.

Stay tuned for more information as we get it! Do you think Sony's Crystal LED prototype has a chance against OLED?

PC Perspective's CES 2012 coverage is sponsored by MSI Computer.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: Engadget

AOC Will Show Off USB Powered 22 Inch LED Monitor At CES

Subject: Displays | January 5, 2012 - 10:49 AM |
Tagged: monitor, led, display, CES, AOC, 1080p

CES, the Consumer Electronics Show, is not until next week, but the tsunami of information and products that is sure to ensue has already started to rise in the form of leaks and teaser announcements. First off today is an announcement by AOC on a product that they will be showing off at CES. According to Maximum PC, the monitor, dubbed the e2251Fwu, will be pretty impressive by USB monitor standards.

AOC.jpg

Specifically, the monitor will be a 22 inch, LED back-lit monitor powered and connected to the PC for video via USB. It is HDCP compatible, sports a 1920x1080 resolution, 5ms response time, and 250 cd/m2 (candela per square metre) brightness, The monitor claims a 20,000,000:1 dynamic contrast ratio, though comparing contrast ratios isn't very reliable (but that's another story).  Unfortuantely, I wasn't able to dig up much more information from around the web.  It will be interesting to see just how much latency the USB connection will add and whether it will be close to the panel's 5ms response time.

Further, the monitor is slated to be available in February for just under 200 bucks. For those of you that have tried out USB connected displays, how well do they work as secondary monitors?

PC Perspective's CES 2012 coverage is sponsored by MSI Computer

Source: Maximum PC

Thin is in for Dell displays; too bad they aren't referring to the bezel

Subject: Displays | January 4, 2012 - 05:14 PM |
Tagged: dell, S2330MX, 23, tn led

The Dell S2330MX 23" LED monitor is advertised as a thin display but not in the dimensions most people hope.  The screen body its self is a hair under 10mm thick which significantly reduces its footprint on your desk.  Unfortunately for you multi-monitor gamers out there the bezel remains the same size and will interfere with your view.  On the plus side, Hardware Canucks found it for sale for under $200 which makes it quite a good deal for a thin LED monitor.  On the other hand, as you might guess from that low price this is a TN based display and apparently not a particularly good example as they saw evidence of ghosting and frustrating colour quality issues.

HWC_dells2330mx.jpg

"When it comes to consumer electronics, thin is in and Dell is leading the way with their new svelte S2330MX monitor. At just 9.9mm thick it will likely be the center of attention but on paper it also boasts some great specifications as well: an efficient LED panel, full HD resolution, a great price and response times of 2ms. It sure sounds like the 2330MX has what it takes to compete with the competition but there's more to this monitor than what first meets the eye."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

 

The EIZO DuraVision FDH3601 is a 4k x 2k Display, and We Want It

Subject: Displays | December 18, 2011 - 11:44 PM |
Tagged: eizo, 4k, FDH3601

I have to admit to you all, there isn't much in the world of computer hardware that I really really want at any given time.  Sure, there are new graphics cards like the pending AMD Radeon HD 7000 series and new CPUs like Intel's Sandy Bridge-E, but in truth, after more than a decade of seeing hardware releases, I pretty much know what to expect.

Imagine my surprise (and my wife's disappointment) when I found an incredibly gorgeous monitor that I simply must have, but is sadled with a ~$30,000  price tag. 

4k01.jpg

You are looking at the EIZO DuraVision FDH3601 - a monitor with a resolution of 4096 x 2160 with a diagonal length of 36-in.  That equates to a pixel density of 128.6 PPI (pixels per inch) compared to your standard 24-in 1080p monitor with a PPI of 91.7. 

4k03.jpg

At a recent event I got to have some hands on time with one of these badass monitors and I have to say I was incredibly impressed with the image quality it provided.  It was running Dirt 3 at the native 4096x2160 resolution and the game has never looked as crisp as it did then.  While it didn't eliminate it, this kind of resolution would really make a dent in the need for higher quality AA algorithms. 

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Here you can see Windows 7 running at the same resolution...

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To connect this monitor to any modern graphics hardware on your PC it requires a pair of dual-link DVI connections or a pair of DisplayPort connections in order to have enough bandwidth for peak refresh rates.  The monitor is definitely not a thin device but for being one of the first 4K displays available to consumers, we'll gladly accept the depth. 

If you want drool over these specs as well, you can head over to the EIZO website.  Alternatively, if you would like to purchase one as a holiday gift for me, just send me an email and I'll give you my address!!

Source: EIZO

Apple May Bring High Pixel Density Displays To MacBook Pro Notebooks

Subject: Displays, Mobile | December 14, 2011 - 04:40 PM |
Tagged: mobile, macbook, apple

 Apple pulled off a four times increase in pixel density on it’s smartphone displays with the iPhone 4 which they dubbed the “Retina Display.” Meanwhile the company’s current 13” MacBook Pro is shackled to a 1280x800 display with an approximate pixel density of 116 pixels per inch. The low resolution (especially vertically) can make reading web pages or working with large documents a hassle as it involves quite a bit of scrolling up and down. New rumors; however, suggest that the Cupertino based company may be looking to step up the display resolution in the next iteration of the MacBook lineup. Allegedly, Digitimes has heard from “sources in the upstream supply chain” that the displays will have as high as a 2880x1800 resolution (and an approximate 261.25 PPI). Pretty impressive for a 13” display!

apple_macbook_pro.png

The current MBP

Whether we will actually see new MacBook models release with such a display remains to be seen; however, it would certainly be a welcomed move as the computer display innovation market has been rather stagnant for the past few years, even going so far as to go backwards in ~24” monitors from 1200 vertical pixels to the now standard 1920x1080 resolution. Perhaps this move by Apple will entice other monitor manufacturers to step up their game and bring 4K gaming to the PC, eventually. Heck, while we are on the topic of monitor tech traveling laterally instead of forward, what ever happened to that curved display from Alienware? Personally, I’m rooting for Apple on this one as the monitor market could use a wake up call!

Source: Tech Report

HD Projectors are fun, 3D HD projectors more so

Subject: Displays | December 7, 2011 - 02:40 PM |
Tagged: 3d display, projector, 1080p, optima, optima hd33

In the interests of dispensing with the bad news first, buying an Optima HD33 3D projector will set you back $1500 and does not come with glasses.  On the other hand, thanks to the Texas Instruments 1080p DLP chipset you get full HD resolution image of up to 300" (aka 25') at 1800 ANSI Lumens.  It is active 3D so the projector ships with an RF emitter for the necessary 3D glasses, which are battery powered.  Techware Labs found that the batteries would last about 2 hours before they started to show problems, at that point requiring a 30 minute recharge time over a USB cable.  It supports all HDMI 1.4a mandatory 3D formats, so you have your choice of 3D glasses to purchase which is good as the projector does not ship with 3D glasses in the box.  Optoma sells the BG-ZD101 DLP Link 3D Glasses separately for about $75 each.

TWL_optoma-hd33-37.jpg

Didn't I see this in a recent game sequel?

"Optoma's HD33 projector which is a full 3D 1080P projector gets reviewed by TechwareLabs. Through a full 90 day review we were very impressed with the Optoma HD33 projector and were very reluctant to ship it back. The Optoma is a very well designed, very bright and sharp projection. The very simple option and use made the setup and usage ever so simple. All you need is a wall big enough to project on and 3D content."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

 

After a few straight days of Skyrim some anti-eyestrain glasses are highly recommended

Subject: Displays | November 18, 2011 - 01:12 PM |
Tagged: gunnar, glasses, eye strain

This post over at The Tech Report starts by describing a situation that anyone reading this familar with, how staring at a PC for 8+ hours a day takes a toll on your eyes.  So, is it possible that the Gunnar Optiks Computer Glasses could save you some eye ache?  It certainly sounds like it from the positive comments these glasses garnered in the review, by a reviewer that is not used to wearing any glasses at all.  They are intended for the long haul, as your eyes will need a bit of time to adjust to the glasses, so you won't notice anything during a quick 5 minute email session you might find your eyes much happier after the 5th hour of gaming.  As well, The Tech Report warns against using these glasses with Photoshop as the yellow tint to the glasses will have an effect on the colours you perceive.  Shame about the logo as well.

TR_glasses-620.jpg

"Does staring at a computer screen for hours on end strain your eyes and give you headaches? Gunnar's computer glasses might help. TR's David Morgan tries on a pair in his latest blog post, with surprising results."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

 

Dell's new 24" UltraSharp IPS display

Subject: Displays | October 27, 2011 - 03:28 PM |
Tagged: dell, UltraSharp U2412M, 24”, ips display

IPS panels have tended to be expensive ino the past but as the technology has matured the prices have been going down and quality has been increasing.  At Hardware Canucks you can see an example of this in the 1920x1200 24" Dell UltraSharp U2412M.  As this is a new generation IPS display, its response time comes close to a TN's at 6ms although the price of just under $400 is not quite in the ballpark of a TN monitor.  The overall conclusion was good, as the colours and viewing angle met expectations though there was some evidence of ghosting in both movies and gaming thanks to the slow gray to gray latency.  Not enough to sour those Beavers; they think its a Dam Good Value.

HWC_mfg_dell.jpg

"By offering a reasonably large, high quality 16:10 IPS panel at a price point which is infinitely more palatable than the U27 or U30 series, the U24s have always been considered a great value. The all new U2412M, hopes to continue this enviable tradition by offering exactly what first time professional consumers want, at a price which undercuts many other IPS-based offerings."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

 

Panel Self Refresh; a new way to save power

Subject: Displays | September 30, 2011 - 01:27 PM |
Tagged: mobile, low power, panel self refresh

The idea behind Panel Self Refresh is a sound one, when displaying static images there is no need for the GPU portion of your processor to be refreshing it at full speed.  If you simply leave the displayed image in the frame buffer you can turn off the GPU and get significant power savings.  It will not help when you are streaming media but if you are reading emails or a pdf file or even browsing pictures, you should see some extension to the life of your battery.  Hardware Secrets describes the technology in their article here.

imageview.jpg

"Manufacturers are always looking for innovative ways to save battery life on laptops. With the embedded DisplayPort 1.3 interface (eDP 1.3), VESA, the Video Standards Association behind DisplayPort, came up with a new idea, the Panel Self Refresh (PSR). Let's see how it works."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

 

HP Introduces Sub-$200 IPS Monitor, Updates Other IPS Displays

Subject: Displays | September 14, 2011 - 11:19 AM |
Tagged: ips monitor, ips display, hp monitor, hp ips, hp display, hp

IPS displays were once a highly sought but also relatively rare consumer product. Only Dell and Apple have consistently offered consumer displays featuring the technology. Other companies, such as NEC, have built such products with a focus on the office rather than the home.

That’s been changing, however, as the overall price of displays continues to stay low and consumer expectations for display quality are impacted by the use of smartphones and tablets. ASUS and LG now have small affordable IPS displays on the market, and HP is joining the crowd with its updated line of ZR-Series “performance displays.”

ZR2040w_Angle Left.jpg

HP has announced 20”, 21.5”, 24” and 27” models. The ZR2040w, the smallest of the new entries, will debut with an impressively modest price tag of $189 and resolution of 1600x900. Connectivity options include DisplayPort, DVI and VGA. Available today from HP.com, it is the second least expensive IPS monitor on the market, trailing just behind the $179 ASUS ML239H. This should be an awesome development for enthusiasts in need of a small, high-quality display, particularly if the quality is on par with HP’s larger products.

Resolution of the ZR-Series goes up in size with the 21.5”, 24” and 27” products offering a resolution of 1920x1080, 1920x1200 and 2560x1440, respectively. MSRP is $289, $425 and $729, respectively.

The 22” and 24” displays are updates to models previously available in the United States. The updated versions announced today are similar to their predecessors in both specifications and price, with the exception of the HDMI port, which wasn’t previously included. If it were my money, I’d go for the ZR2440w – the ZR24w was excellent, and the HDMI port on the new model makes it ready for use with a wider variety of video cards.

ZR2040w_Back.jpg

Also included in this announcement is the HP Compaq LE2202x, a 21.5” LED backlit monitor. While it offers a resolution of 1920x1080, it does not feature IPS technology. It also lacks HDMI, which would seem to indicate that it leans towards use in an office environment.'

Source: HP

 

Source: HP

Viewsonic attempts to entice you to buy their 3D display

Subject: Displays | September 13, 2011 - 01:19 PM |
Tagged: viewsonic, 3d display, V3D245

The Viewsonic V3D245 is a 24" LED monitor with a 1080p resolution that will let you play in 3D without needing to pick up extra peripherals.  The display will work equally well with both PCs and consoles and most importantly the active glasses are included with the monitor.  You provide the signal and the display will give you 3D gaming.  Drop by Ars Technica for a closer look.

22777_350w279h.jpg

"That being said, ViewSonic wants to make you a deal. If you give them $500, they'll give you a 24" monitor for your PC and gaming consoles that does 3D like a champ. There is nothing extra to hook up, nothing to be added; it's an all-in-one solution that does 3D as well as anything I've seen on the market. At $500, this display isn't cheap, but the quality is such that you'll be happy about spending the money."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

Source: Ars Technica