Corsair Announces Obsidian Series 450D Mid-tower PC Case

Subject: Cases and Cooling | March 25, 2014 - 10:53 AM |
Tagged: corsair, Obsidian Series 450D

Fremont, California — March 25, 2014 — Corsair, a designer and supplier of high-performance components to the PC hardware market, today announced the immediate availability of the Obsidian Series 450D performance mid-tower PC case. The 450D matches the iconic, brushed aluminum design of the Obsidian series with an increased focus on high-airflow, ensuring your system not only looks great, but runs cool.

Behind the 450D’s aluminum mesh intake grill are dual 140mm AF140L intake fans to direct airflow straight to a PC’s hottest component, the graphics card. The rear AF120L 120mm fan keeps the airflow moving smoothly and five other optional fan locations give you serious cooling flexibility. The 450D’s fan mounts also accommodate a wide range of water-cooling radiators, with room for up to a 360mm radiator in the roof, a 280mm radiator in the front, and a 240mm radiator in the floor.

The 450D also boasts all of the features that make the Obsidian Series a favorite among enthusiasts around the world. Easily accessible dust filters on the roof, front, and bottom ensure your system will stay looking its best, while modular tool-free 3.5”/2.5” hard disk mounts offer a wide range of storage options, or can be removed entirely to prioritize airflow.

“From day one, our Obsidian Series has made our case lineup a force to be reckoned with.” said George Makris, Product Manager at Corsair. “With Obsidian 450D we’ve now added a mid-tower case that has outstanding air cooling capabilities, but can house lots of water cooling parts, too.”

Obsidian Series 450D Specifications

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Expansion Room

  • Three tool-free 3.5”/2.5” combo bays in a modular hard drive cage, with two tool-free 2.5” drive bays behind the motherboard
  • Two tool-free 5.25” bays for expansion
  • Two front mounted USB 3.0 ports for easy peripheral or external storage connection
  • 7 expansion slots

Cooling Flexibility

  • Three included high-airflow fans for excellent airflow at low noise levels
    • 2 front 140mm
    • 1 rear 120mm
  • Perforated front brushed aluminum fascia for improved airflow
  • Room for up to 8 fans
  • Radiator compatibility:
    • Top – 360mm/280mm
    • Front – 280mm/240mm
    • Bottom – 240mm
    • Rear – 120mm

Builder Friendly Features

  • Thumbscrew side panel removal and expansion slots
  • Tool-free drive bays
  • Center-post standoff to hold motherboard in place during installation
  • Easily accessible and removable front, rear, and top dust filters
  • Cable routing with rubber grommets for superior airflow and neater builds

Dimensions and Weight

  • Length x Width x Height
  • 19.5” x 8.3” x 19.6” inches
  • 494 x 210 x 497mm
  • Weight 7 kg 15.4 lbs

Pricing, Availability, and Warranty
The Obsidian Series 450D has a suggested retail price of $119.99 in the US and is available in April from Corsair's worldwide network of authorized distributors and resellers. It is backed with a limited 2-year warranty and Corsair’s excellent customer service and technical support.

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Here are a couple of reviews of the brand new case:

CASES & COOLING

Source: Corsair

Corsair Expands PC Case Line with a Trio of Carbide Series SPEC Gaming Case

Subject: Cases and Cooling | March 19, 2014 - 02:31 PM |
Tagged: SPEC gaming case, corsair

Fremont, California —March 18, 2014 — Corsair, a designer and supplier of high-performance components to the PC hardware market, today announced the Carbide SeriesTM SPEC range of gaming PC cases in three models: the SPEC-01, SPEC-02, and SPEC-03. Characterized by aggressive styling, modern features, superior air cooling, and expandability, the SPEC range offers everything gamers need from a case and nothing they don’t.

All three SPEC cases have been designed with PC gamers in mind, stripping out the unnecessary and leaving a lean and mean looking chassis that delivers great cooling and makes PC building quick and easy. The cases boast modern features such as USB 3.0 ports, native SSD mounts, and extensive cable-routing options, as well as a huge side panel window to show off the hardware inside. The black-painted interior is optimized to direct unobstructed airflow to the PC’s hottest components, with a front-mounted LED fan providing ample cooling. Tool-free drive bays and removable dust filters add to SPEC’s wide array of high-end features.

There’s plenty of room to expand inside too, with support for even the longest graphics cards, front fan mounts for dual 140mm and 120mm fans, and seven expansion slots. Whatever version of SPEC gamers choose, they will have a case with the flexibility to handle years of upgrades.

“Entry level cases are usually antiquated, old designs. Some still have room for floppy drives,” said George Makris, Product Manager at Corsair. “With the addition of the Carbide Series SPEC to our line, gamers can now get a case with modern features and great styling combined with superior cooling and expandability at a fantastic price.”

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Carbide Series SPEC Specifications

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Pricing, Availability, and Warranty

The SPEC-01 case has a suggested retail price of $49.99 USD and the SPEC-02 and SPEC-03 cases have suggested retail prices of $59.99 USD. The cases will be available in April from Corsair’s worldwide network of authorized distributors and resellers. All are backed with a limited 2-year warranty and Corsair customer service and technical support.

Source: Corsair

Phanteks makes watercooling easier with the Enthoo Primo

Subject: Cases and Cooling | March 17, 2014 - 01:43 PM |
Tagged: phanteks, Enthoo Primo Ultimate Chassis, full tower

With watercooling becoming more and more common some manufactures are trying to make it easier by designing cases which are set up to accommodate radiators. Phanteks' Enthoo Primo Ultimate is a pefect example as it ships with a bracket to help you install a radiator with up to two 140mm fans.  Pet owners will love the filtres set up on all intake ports on this case including ones on the bottom which are very easily accessible.  [H]ard|OCP were very impressed with this case; even more so when you consider this is Phanteks' first foray into this part of the cooling market.

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"Phanteks is known for its wide variety of fans, but is broadening its brush stroke by now building its own computer cases. The Enthoo Primo Ultimate Chassis is a full tower computer case that promises the "Ultimate Water Cooling Solution," as well as removable filters, and a thermally isolated PSU location."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: [H]ard|OCP

GDC 14: Valve's Steam Controller Is Similar to Dev Days

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling, Shows and Expos | March 14, 2014 - 10:44 PM |
Tagged: GDC, gdc 14, valve, Steam Controller

Two months ago, Valve presented a new prototype of their Steam Controller with a significantly changed button layout. While the overall shape and two thumbpads remained constant, the touchscreen disappeared and the face buttons more closely resembled something from an Xbox or PlayStation. Another prototype image has been released, ahead of GDC, without many changes.

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Valve is still in the iteration process for its controller, however. Ten controllers will be available at GDC, each handmade. This version has been tested internally for some undisclosed amount of time, but this will be the first time that others will give their feedback since the design that was shown at CES. The big unknown is: to what level are they going to respond to feedback? Are we at the stage where it is about button sizing? Or, will it change radically - like to a two-slice toaster case with buttons inside the slots.

GDC is taking place March 17th through the 21st. The expo floor opens on the 19th.

Corsair and Cherry Answer Mechanical Keyboard Questions

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling | March 10, 2014 - 11:16 PM |
Tagged: corsair, cherry, Cherry MX, mechanical keyboard

A lot of diverse topics arose from the Corsair blogs, lately. This time, they compiled fan questions and enlisted mechanical switch and keyboard manufacturer, Cherry Corporation, to provide answers. Coming in at over two-thousand words, it is quite lengthy.

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Many of the questions seemed to come from long-term fans of their mechanical keyboards. One person asked whether a specific ergonomic keyboard (G80-5000) would make a return, while another inquired about Cherry-branded Hall Effect switches (presumably for analog controls). In all, if you are interested in mechanical keyboards, it is worth a read. They kept a little secret sauce, secret, but otherwise seemed pretty open in their responses.

Source: Corsair

Razer Designs New Mechanical Switches

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling | March 6, 2014 - 07:22 PM |
Tagged: razer, Cherry MX, cherry, mechanical keyboard

So Razer has a history of doing the unexpected. The peripheral manufacturer has branched out into other segments, including laptops, tablets, software, exercise equipment, and so forth. Their April Fools announcements are often hilarious but their real products sometimes feel as far-fetched, except that they release and apparently find an audience. If Project Christine comes out then it would be the best example, but Project Fiona and the Razer Blade seemed just as unlikely - and I've seen multiple Blades in the wild.

And yet it is their keyboard announcement which surprises me, today.

It turns out that Razer decided to design their own key switch modules, instead of ordering them off-the-shelf from ZF Electronics (Cherry). Razer will not manufacture these key modules, and they look enough like Cherry MX switches that I could guess who their third party manufacturer is, but they did push their own specifications. Razer claims that the main advantage is a higher actuation point, leading to less latency between when your finger starts moving, and when it has moved enough to activate the button.

Razer has developed two switches: "Green", which is their analogy of the Cherry MX Blue, and "Orange", which is analogous to the Cherry MX Brown. The former is clicky while the latter has a relatively silent bump.

The Green switches are available in the BlackWidow, BlackWidow Tournament, and BlackWidow (with the Orange switches in each Stealth variant). Some models will ship in late March with the rest shipping in April.

Source: Razer

Corsair Blogs About... Oh Come On!

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling | March 1, 2014 - 06:51 PM |
Tagged: corsair, mining

When mining some form of cryptographic coin, very few components in the system are utilized. A GPU is basically a self-contained massively parallel cruncher with its own memory and logic. The host system just needs to batch the tasks which leads to PCs with dirt-cheap CPUs, a very modest amount of RAM, and quite literally a half-dozen high-end graphics cards.

If you thought that gaming machines skew a little too much towards GPUs, you should see a mining rig with five R9 290X cards fed by a Sempron.

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As you can guess, since many GPUs are double-slot, it might be difficult to fit seven of them in a seven-slot motherboard with a limited number PCIe lanes. To get around this limitation, miners attach their graphics cards to extension cables. Thankfully (for them), mining does not pass a lot of data across the bus to the host system. Even a single PCIe fails to be a bottleneck, apparently.

Anyway, the Corsair blog created an open-air rack which hangs six graphics cards (five HD 7970s and a R9 290X) above a motherboard housing an Intel Celeron G1830. For air, a quartet of Corsair fans suck air upwards and around the graphics cards. For power, of course they use the Corsair AX1500i because why not mine with an arc welding torch. It apparently had more power capacity than the breaker they originally hooked it up to. Whoops.

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While ridiculous, I do hope to see systems with multiple (even mismatched) graphics processors as we move toward batches of general mathematics. PhysX was not entirely successful in teaching users that GPUs do not need to be in SLi or Crossfire configurations to load balance. It is just finding an appropriate way to split tasks without requiring a lot of bottlenecks in setting it up.

I might not mine coins, but I could see some benefit to having 35 TeraFLOPs across seven compute devices. I could also see Corsair wanting to sell me a power supply for said PC.

Source: Corsair

Antec bumps up it's Kuhler series with the 1250

Subject: Cases and Cooling | February 24, 2014 - 11:45 AM |
Tagged: antec, all in one, water cooler, KUHLER H20 1250

As you might expect from the name, the Antec Kuhler 1250 is a larger version of the popular all in one liquid CPU coolers. This model is designed for overclockers, with a radiator measuring 159mm x  120mm x  27mm which does limit the amount of enclosures it will fit in unless you plan on an external mount.  As it is only $10 more than the smaller 950 it comes out ahead on [H]ard|OCP's dollar to performance ratio; at $120 it is a bit of an investment but for overclockers it is a decent solution to heat problems.

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"Antec and its All-In-One sealed system CPU coolers have been around for a good while now. We still have some of its first series working well here in the HardOCP offices. Today we have Antec's newly designed high end Kuhler model 1250. It has some unique offerings all based on new cold plates and big double fan radiator."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Seasonic's S12G-550; you have to pay for prime power

Subject: Cases and Cooling | February 21, 2014 - 02:49 PM |
Tagged: PSU, seasonic, S12G-550, 550W, 80 Plus Gold

With an 80 Plus Gold rating and the ability to deliver 45A on its single 12V rail the 550W Seasonic S12G-550 PSU is perfect for a mid-range rig.  A pair of 6+2 PCIe connectors gives you a choice of powering a single high end GPU or two low or midrange GPUs.  It is also relatively small, barely larger than the 120mm cooling fan it uses though some may be turned off by its non-modular cables.  At around $85 it is not the least expensive model at that wattage but [H]ard|OCP's Silver Award proves it is worth it if you want solid power for your system.

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"Seasonic builds some of the best computer power supplies on the market. When do we ever get a power supply that is actually a better product than what it is marketed to be? Not often, but that is the case with the S12G-550 PSU. It is not terribly inexpensive, but it is a great value for your hard earned dollars."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Insert Thirty-Six Supapipe Jokes Here

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling | February 17, 2014 - 05:36 PM |
Tagged: passive cooling, cooling

Somewhere in the world, someone is developing a passively-cooled desktop made up of copper water pipes. Thirty-six (36) of them pass through what looks like an aluminum block attached to the socket LGA 1155 heatsink mount. As the copper pipes heat up, it passes to the air within it. Convection forces this to exhaust upward through the copper chimney and replaces it with cool air from below.

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All Images, Credit: "Monster", CoolEnjoy.net Forums

From the 3D prototype, it looks like two passively-cooled discrete GPUs are intended to fit just above the elbow in the chimney. Even from the rendering, it is clear that quite a lot of thought and effort has gone into this project. I cannot tell how they intend to access PCIe slots from up there, be it a larger motherboard or an extension adapter, but options probably exist.

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Initial testing with a Core i5-4440 (stock frequencies) show around 65 deg C at full CPU load. This should be in line with a typical air-based cooler.

Either way, this is the most impressive "SuperPipe" cooler that I have seen.

Your move, MSI.

Source: CoolEnjoy

bequiet! lives up to their name with the Dark Rock Pro 3

Subject: Cases and Cooling | February 12, 2014 - 12:50 PM |
Tagged: heatsink, Dark Rock Pro 3, bequiet!

At 150x137x163mm (6x5.4x6.4") in size and 1197g the Dark Rock Pro 3 is a hefty chunk of copper and aluminium.  The extra size does allow for the use of a 135mm fan on the interior with the more common 120m variety on the side which helps make this cooler very quiet even at full load.  The performance was decent but a bit of a let down considering [H]ard|OCP saw better performance from its predecessor, the Dark Rock Pro 2.  Still, if it is quiet performance you need then this is certainly a cooler worth consideration.

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"There is no doubt that when it comes to CPU air cooling, marketing terms like "category leader" and "virtually inaudible" will get your attention. be quiet!'s Dark Rock Pro 3 air cooler touts cooling up to 250 watts, which is stout at best in the world of air cooling. Does the Darck Rock Pro 3 perform and bring with it a cooling value."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Silverstone proves you don't need size to have power

Subject: Cases and Cooling | February 4, 2014 - 01:57 PM |
Tagged: Silverstone, strider gold s, 850W

SilverStone's Strider series has been with us for quite a while and tends to be among the better PSUs around.  The new Strider Gold S provides 850W of power, with up to 70A on the 12V and four 6+2 PCIe power connectors for multiple GPUs.  All of that power comes in a package a mere 150x86x150 mm, barely enough to fit the 120mm fan.  [H]ard|OCP strapped it to their torture devices and saw that it could outperform even some of its close relatives in the Strider family.  Not only does it get a pass, it picks up a Silver Award on its way.

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"Good things come in small packages and SilverStone continues its Gold S series with smaller fully modular footprints at the 850 watt power level. SilverStone claims Gold level efficiency, tight voltage regulation, a single rail design, low fan noise, and plenty of PCIe outlets. All the things that SilverStone is famous for. "

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: [H]ard|OCP

In Win's fancy new glass and aluminium case

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 28, 2014 - 01:10 PM |
Tagged: in win, 904 Premium

Most of the reviews below the fold are focusing on mATX cases but not In Win, they are large and proud of their new 904 Premium enclosure.  Standing 28"H x 14"L x 27.5"W and made of rolled aluminium with a tempered glass side panel this case is not one to hide under a desk.  From hotswappable bays to magnetic filters for the fans this is a very high end case and can handle watercooling setups for the serious enthusiast.  [H]ard|OCP loved everything about this case but warn you it does come at a premium, the MSRP is $280.

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Source: [H]ard|OCP

CoolerMaster has a liquid surprise for you

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 20, 2014 - 04:36 PM |
Tagged: coolermaster, Nepton 280L, liquid cooling system

FrostyTech have seen a lot of coolers over the years, lately there has been a large influx of liquid cooling systems to review which for the most part all perform relatively the same.  It has been a long time since they saw a new product offer a big increase in performance but Coolermaster came through with their new Nepton 280L.  Part of the great performance is likely due to the heat exchanger, 30mm thick and 311x140mm in size with a pair of 140mm PWM fans to allow you to choose the most powerful cooling possible or to reduce fan noise at the cost of temperature.  On high nothing could touch this cooler and even better, it stayed near the top when running quietly and you can pick it up for $150

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"Coolermaster's Nepton 280L is the best performing all-in-one CPU watercooler Frostytech has tested... thus far. More surprisingly for us, the Nepton 280L managed to rise to the top of the 200W Intel LGA2011, 150W & 85W Intel LGA115x/775 and 125W AMD synthetic thermal heatsink test results charts. After testing +750 CPU thermal solutions, it's kind of nice to be surprised."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: FrostyTech

Faith in Humanity Declining: Camera Mice.

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling | January 18, 2014 - 05:44 PM |
Tagged: camera, mouse, camera mouse, Japan

Have you ever been sitting at your laptop or desktop thinking, "I really need a selfie right about now and this webcam simply will not do"? I have no idea what is wrong with you. Do you not have a cellphone if spontaneous self-photography means that much?

But at least a Japanese company has your back... or is it front?

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For the love of... it's even being held the wrong way!!!

Introducing the Camera Mouse. It is a mouse with a camera in it. It is useful if you want to take pictures of things with your mouse. It will be sold by King Jim Co., LTD. which is one of the largest office supplies manufacturers in Japan.

While I have been thinking about this news story, I have been thinking about legitimate use cases. It has been a struggle. I just cannot understand why someone would want to purchase a 1600x1200 camera which is hard-wired to their computer. Thus far, I have only come up with a single possibilities (although it would require significant software development resources that I doubt they intend to provide). The only way I could see myself purchasing this mouse is if it came with OCR and translation software so that I could point it at my monitor and automatically translate any text on screen.

Even then, I expect the vast majority of foreign language content would be in a web browser and two of those automatically translate text anyway. It would help for text in images or text in videos but otherwise I could not see the point even then. Moreover, all of this assumes the software even exists in a reasonable package (Bluestacks running Google Translate is probably no more useful than a cell phone).

But who knows. I could be missing the bigger picture. I could be missing the subtle nuances of their target audience. Maybe I just need to see things at two megapixels from under a sweaty palm.

Source: King Jim

Thermaltake Launches Full Tower Core V71 Case

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 17, 2014 - 06:46 PM |
Tagged: water cooling, thermaltake, full tower, eatx, core v71

Thermaltake recently launched the Core V71, which is an attractive full tower case with a modular drive bay design and plethora of cooling options. The cold rolled steel (SPCC) chassis is all black with large mesh front and top panels. A large side panel window and LED fans show off the internals.

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The full tower Core V71 measures 23" x 9.1" x 22" (583x230x560mm) and supports E-ATX motherboards, 8 PCI slots, 185mm tall CPU coolers, up to 400mm long graphics cards (with hard drives removed, 310mm with the drives installed), two 5.25" drive bays, and eight 3.5" or 2.5" hard drives. The drive cages are tool-less and can be completely removed from the case. In fact, users can take out the drive cages and support bar to completely rid the PC of drive bays. Alternatively, users can utilize two hidden drive bays on the back of the motherboard tray to maintain a clean design without completely sacrificing 3.5" storage.

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The case has a spot for a standard ATX PSU in the bottom of the case and numerous rubber grommets for routing and hiding cables behind the motherboard tray.

As far as cooling, users can go with water cooling radiators and/or air cooling. The cooling possibilities work out as follows:

  • Top:  2 x 200mm / 140mm or 3 x 120mm
  • Front:  2 x 200mm / 140mm or 3 x 120mm
  • Rear:  1 x 140mm / 120mm
  • Bottom:  2 x 120mm

That works out to as many as nine 120mm fans or four 200mm fans and three 120mm fans if you opt for air cooling. On the water cooling front, users could put as many as two 420mm (or smaller) radiators, one 240mm radiator, and one 120mm radiator. This would be a good use case (heh) for NZXT's Kraken G10 GPU water cooling mount with allows users to cool their GPU(s) using CPU-style closed loop water coolers in 120mm and 240mm varieties or even going all out with a custom water cooling loop for every component in the system. There are a lot of possibilities with this full tower case!

Thermaltake Core V71 Back Internals.jpg

In all, the Core V71 appears to be a really nice full tower option with decent looks, tool-less bays, and ample cooling mounts. The case will be available soon with an MSRP of $160 in the US. For a new full tower that's not bad and has my interest!

Source: Thermaltake

Steam Controller Is Changing?

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling, Shows and Expos | January 16, 2014 - 12:19 AM |
Tagged: valve, Steam Dev Days, Steam Controller, CES 2014, CES

Valve has always been a company based on experimentation and it looks like the Steam Controller is not the lighthouse which guides SteamOS through the fog. Just a week after presenting the prototype at CES, a 3D mockup of a new one makes not-insignificant changes. Gone is the touchscreen and the first revealed button placement. Frankly, just about the only things untouched on the front face are the twin touchpads and the palm grips.

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Image Credit: Leszek Godlewski (Twitter)

To fully understand the breadth of the changes, the announcement image is included below. There is basically no discussion about the back so that aspect might be untouched.

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The changes were apparently made to assist compatibility with games ported from more traditional input schemes. Looking at the original prototype, there was no obvious mapping from a Sony or Microsoft-based controller to those buttons spread out for both the left and right thumbs to access. The new setup is the typical four face buttons on the right and four more buttons on the left as a surrogate directional pad. If they continue to iterate down this path I hope that the directional pad is more effective than most from the last two generations. It looks like the four directions are separated from one another which does not inspire confidence.

There are two stories which entangle on this one. The first is that Valve is willing to perform rapid iteration until they achieve what they consider a maximum. That is the method to quickest success especially since it allows cross-pollination between designs.

The second is that it also makes the public a little bit nervous.

Source: VR-Zone

NZXT H440 Is A Water Cooling Friendly Case Without Optical Drive Bays

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling | January 15, 2014 - 11:42 PM |
Tagged: water cooling, nzxt, h440, fn v2, 140mm

NZXT unveiled a new mid-tower chassis called the H440 that eschews the archaic 5.25” drive bays in favor of improved cooling and a simpler design. The PC case comes in two color schemes: white with black accents and black with red accents.

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The new H440 measures 220mm x 510mm x 475.3mm (approximately 9” x 20” x 19”) and features a sleek design with a shrouded PSU and ample cable routing grommets. There are no 5.25” bays, but users can install up to eight 3.5” or 2.5” drives in removable sleds. There is a large cutout for installing aftermarket CPU coolers up to 180mm tall, seven PCI expansion slots, filtered vents on the front and rear, and support for up to seven fans. A massive side panel window shows off the hardware while hiding the PSU and hard drives along with the majority of cables coming off of the PSU. Users can install graphics cards up to 294mm with the hard drive sleds intact or 406.2mm with the drive sleds removed.

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On the cooling front, NZXT is including one 140mm and three 120mm FN V2 fans with the case. The FN V2 fans are NZXT's latest design and driven by the company's fan controller. The case can support water cooling radiators on the top, front, and rear of the case or users can add to the included front and rear fans by installing up to three 120mm (or two 140mm) fans on the top of the case.

NZXT H440 PC Case (1).jpg

The NZXT H440 case has a flat front case panel, but there are filtered vents along the left and right side of the front panel to draw in air. The front IO panel consists of two USB 3.0 ports, two USB 2.0 ports, and two audio jacks. There is an LED-lit power button the left-front side of the H440.

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The black and red SKU in particular looks rather sharp, and offers up useful features at a decent price.

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Specifically, the new H440 will be available soon in two SKUs (CA-H440W-W1 and CA-H440W-M1) with a MSRP of $119.99 USD. The case comes with a 2 year warranty.

Source: NZXT

Perhaps the least of Zalman's 3 new liquid cooling systems

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 15, 2014 - 03:41 PM |
Tagged: zalman, LQ315, liquid cooling system

Zalman's new LQ315 liquid CPU cooler will fit just about any modern socket except for LGA775 and sports a compact 38x153x120mm heat exchanger. 11mm OD rubber tubing and a Propylene Glycol based coolant move the heat from your CPU to that exchanger and its single 120mm fan.  FrostyTech tried it with two fans and saw some additional improvements but still felt the shape of the exchanger might have been holding back performance somewhat. The performance was decent but FrostyTech prefers the LQ320 to this model.

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"Zalman released three water coolers in the hand of PC enthusiasts earlier this year, in this review Frostytech is testing out the LQ315 model - the middle child as it were. The LQ315 ships fully assembled, plumbed and filled with a coolant. It installs onto Intel socket LGA115x/1366/2011 and AMD socket AM2/AM3/FM1/FM2 processors. It uses a 120mm wide aluminum heat exchanger equipped with a single 120mm PWM fan that operates at 2000-900RPM. The pump/waterblock is built around a novel micro-skived copper base plate that is connected to the heat exchanger via a 30cm length of flexible rubber tubing."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: FrostyTech

Silverstone's Gold 750W PSU

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 13, 2014 - 02:35 PM |
Tagged: Silverstone, strider gold s, ST75F-GS, 750w, 80 Plus Gold

The SilverStone Strider Gold S ST75F-GS is a decent choice to power a moderately powerful gaming PC with four 6+2 PCIe power connectors able to deliver up to 744W at 62A on its single 12V rail.  As well it is a rather short PSU at 6" long making it a good contender to power a system built in a smaller casing while still sporting an efficient 120mm fan.  In [H]ard|OCP's testing it didn't take top spot in any one category but did rate very highly on all tests, arguably a better result than a PSU that is top notch in one area but lacklustre in others.  With an MSRP of $135 and an 80 PLUS Gold rating it is a good choice though a better warranty would be greatly appreciated.

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"SilverStone is back today with its 750 watt computer power supply that is part of its S series. It is billed as the smallest 750w PSU that is fully modular. So this PSU should appeal to those looking to custom builds that could either have size or cable customization in mind. Does SilverStone keep with its longstanding quality traditions?"

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Source: [H]ard|OCP