Is it worth investing in an 80+ rated PSU to save yourself money?

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 11, 2011 - 01:19 PM |
Tagged: PSU, 80 gold, 80+ silver, 80+ platinum, energy efficiency

For most there are two main reasons for paying the premium price to purchase an 80+ rated PSU; the eventual money savings from lowered power costs and to reduce your carbon footprint by using a more efficient PSU.  [H]ard|OCP put the first reason to the test, examining several cases of usage for PSUs of differing wattage and usage.  As well, they point out the issues with some ratings, as PSUs that are labeled as 80+ Platinum only deserve a Gold rating in most usage scenarios.  Their findings are based on theoretical usage patterns, it is hard to imaging a PSU operating at 50% load day after day, but this will give you an idea how many days or years it will take for you to start seeing a return on your investment.

H_PSU_ROI.gif

"A HardOCP editorial about the 80 Plus program and how it is changing the computer power supplies you are buying. Is this good, bad, or ugly, and should you care? Did you know that you paid for that 80Plus rating on your shiny new PSU? Certainly PSU efficiency is a great thing, but what about the rating system?"

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Source: [H]ard|OCP

Intel Core i7 2700K Overclocked to 5GHz On Air

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 7, 2011 - 05:49 AM |
Tagged: cpu, Intel, core i7, 2700K, cooling

An aspiring overclocker and Coolaler forum go-er "u48802109" got his/her hands on an engineering sample and set out to see just how far he could push the upcoming Intel Core i7 2700K processor using air cooling.  In an exciting result, the overclocker was able to achieve a stable 5 GHz overclock on the 2700K with a 100 MHz bus speed and 50x multiplier.  Even more amazing are the voltage and temperature results (keeping in mind that we don't know the particular HSF being used) of the overclock.  Specifically, they were able to hit 5 GHz with 1.384 V and hit a maximum temperature of 65 C.  

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A zoomed in look at the CPU-Z readout.

While air cooling may not be able to support going to much higher frequencies, water cooling could certainly open up even more headroom in the chip.  Also, keeping in mind that these are engineering samples, it will be interesting to see where the Core i7 2700K falls once it starts rolling out to consumers.  If these results hold out, it does seem like it may just be worth it to pay a few extra bucks and eschew the 2600K for new builds.  What are your thoughts, are these results encouraging to you?  You can see the full overclocking results here.

Source: Coolaler

Corsair Announces Availability of $139 Gaming PC Case

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 6, 2011 - 05:22 PM |
Tagged: corsair, corsair carbide series 400R

FREMONT, California — October 6th, 2011 — Corsair, a worldwide designer and supplier of high-performance components to the PC gaming hardware market, today announced worldwide retail availability of the Carbide Series 500R gaming PC case.

The Carbide Series 500R joins the Carbide Series 400R, released in September. Like the 400R, it has been designed for PC gamers with the same builder-friendly philosophy as the award-winning Obsidian Series and Graphite Series of PC cases, and at an exceptionally aggressive price point. The 500R’s upgraded design is available in arctic white and graphite gray and includes a side mesh panel with a 200mm fan for additional GPU cooling, a multi-channel fan controller, and movable hard drive cages for installation of graphics cards of up to 452mm in length.

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"The Carbide Series 500R takes everything that's great about the 400R, inherits additional features from our higher-end cases, and wraps them all in a new skin that really draws the eye." said Ruben Mookerjee, VP and General Manager for Components at Corsair. "Cooling performance is superb, and it’s a great platform for high-performance gaming rigs with multiple graphics cards."

Corsair Carbide Series: high-volume, aggressively priced cases for demanding PC gamers
The Carbide Series of gaming PC cases is designed for performance enthusiasts who want a budget case but who demand serious gaming case features. New system builds and upgrades are fast and simple, thanks to the easy side panel access and tool-free drive installation and removal. Corsair's innovative cable-management system allows for clean-looking builds and improved airflow. Support for USB 3.0 and 2.5" SSDs is built-in, and USB 3.0 ports are provided on the front panel and connect directly to motherboards with compatible USB 3.0 headers.

The Corsair Carbide Series 500R is available from authorized etailers worldwide at a US suggested retail price of $139 USD.

Source: Corsair

Corsair Launches New H40 and H70 CORE Sealed Loop Water Coolers

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 6, 2011 - 04:39 PM |
Tagged: water cooler, liquid cooling, hsf, h70, h40, corsair, cooling

 

Corsair has released two new sealed loop water coolers dubbed the Corsair H40 and H70 Core that are aimed at budget builds and enthusiasts who prefer to provide their own fans. These new models, like their predecessors, are compatible with both AMD and Intel sockets and will have mounting hardware, the cooler itself, and a illustrated quick start guide that the company claims will be helpful during setup. As the coolers use a somewhat odd mounting ring system, photo illustrations can indeed be helpful (as I learned when setting up my own H70).

 

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The new budget H40 water cooler

The H40 is Corsair’s new budget sealed loop water cooler, replacing the H50 as the company’s entry level cooler. It features an aluminum radiator able to accommodate up to two 120mm fans (one 2000rpm 120mm fan is included). The radiator connects to the water block via flexible black tubing, and the cold plate is also composed of aluminum (versus the H70’s copper base plate). It includes mounting hardware to support all the latest AMD and Intel sockets up to AMD’s FM1 and Intel’s socket 1155.

The H70 Core (or CORE if you prefer Corsair’s all caps nomenclature) is a retooled H70 water cooling product that eschews the fans in favor of a slightly cheaper retail price. Further, by selling the H70 without fans, enthusiasts are able to purchase (or reuse) their own fans. The H70 CORE water cooler itself is the same as the previous 70, and features a 38mm thick aluminum radiator connected by sealed flexible tubing with a copper cold plate. The radiator can accommodate two 120mm fans and the device is compatible with both Intel and AMD CPU (Processor) sockets.

The H70 without bundled fans is a sealed water cooler that many enthusiasts have been asking Corsair for for a long time, and it’s good to see the company responding to requests. The H40 may well be a decent option for a quiet, low power HTPC. The H40 carries and MSRP of $59 USD while the H70 CORE has an MSRP of $89 USD. The H70 with bundled fans retails for around $95 USD, so it will be interesting to see where the H70 CORE will fan in retail and whether it will provide a good value. Both sealed loop water coolers will be available worldwide later this month.

 

Source: Corsair

Is Thermaltake's new UFO case really out of this world?

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 5, 2011 - 05:30 PM |
Tagged: thermaltake, Thermaltake Spacecraft VF-I, VN60001W2Z

The newest member to Thermaltake's eSPORT lineup of enclosures is the Spacecraft VF-1, a steel mid tower enclosure for mATX and ATX boards.  The red components to the tool less drive installation does add some nice highlights to the interior of your case and the space behind the backplate and back side panel allow you to run your cable behind the scenes to keep a nice clean case.  One unique feature is the ability to securely attach a radiator to the top of the case, which not only makes sense but is a great space saver.  If you feel you could use a UFO under your desk then drop by Benchmark Reviews for a look.

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"What do you look for in a case and what is the most you are willing to spend? Today's case isn't exactly high end and to match that it doesn't have all of the features and extras you would expect if you were shelling out cash in the €100+ range. System builders and budget gamers this one is for you, Thermaltake have released the Spacecraft VF-I Mid-Tower PC Case model VN60001W2Z and online retailers are listing it between €50~€65 and Benchmark Reviews has got an early peek at it. For that price you get a sturdy little case with a small side window, tool free drive mounting, removable air intake filters, room for video cards up to 320mm long, room for CPU coolers up to 168mm tall and also room for a 120.2 (240mm) watercooling radiator in the roof. This should prove to be an interesting review so please read on."

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Kingwin aims to deliver silent power with their new 500W Stryker

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 3, 2011 - 12:42 PM |
Tagged: PSU, Kingwin, Kingwin Stryker 500W, silent, fanless

Not too long ago Lee gave the PC Perspective Gold Seal to the Kingwin Stryker 500W Fanless PSU thanks to the superior power quality and five year warranty.  Just in case you weren't swayed by his testing, you can double check the results over at Think Computers.   They tried the same PSU with a different test machine set up and came up with the same results, a 80PLUS Platinum rated silent PSU that delivers everything you would expect.  Their only negative point was the same as Lee's, the price is more than double the cost of an equivalent PSU with active cooling.  You have to pay a premium for this type of PSU but it is worth it if you need it.

TR_kigwinstryker500.jpg

"Almost everyone wants the quietest yet most powerful computer possible. Most components generate noise because of the fans cooling them, or because of moving parts. Obviously, solid state drives have eliminated the necessity for moving parts for storage and liquid cooling can replace fans for most components. However, there’s still one pesky component which still generates noise: the high wattage power supply unit. Fanless PSUs have been around for a while, but they’re generally lower wattage and meant for business machines or ultra-efficient HTPCs."

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CM Storm Trooper; great case but a lousy shot with a blaster

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 29, 2011 - 02:21 PM |
Tagged: cooler master, storm trooper, XL-ATX

The Cooler Master Storm Trooper joins a small group of XL-ATX cases available to fit such large motherboards as the EVGA SR-2.  Not only will it fit extra large motherboards, you can add 14 drives and several 240mm radiators if you so desire in this 250 x 605.6 x 578.5 mm (9.8" x 23.8" x 22.8") case.  With all that space they could fit a lot on the outside of the case as well, a 2.5" external docking station, a pair of USB 3.0 and a pair of USB 2.0 connectors, as well as an eSATA port.    Headphone and microphone jacks and an LED On/Off button for the fans and three LED lights to indicate what setting you have the 6-speed fan controller set to.  Head over to Bjorn3D for a full review.

bj3d_stormtrooper.jpg

"Ever since the HAF X was released last year in June, we haven't seen anything too exciting from Cooler Master. The HAF X supported XL-ATX motherboards like the GIGABYTE G1.Assassin or the EVGA Classified, but for extreme enthusiasts, it is a disappointment that there are only a limited number of cases that actually support these motherboards. Users can get modded cases, but that will cost a fortune, so Cooler Master designed a case that is not only very customizable, but also easy to carry around. This is a new addition to Cooler Master's Storm lineup of products, called the Cooler Master Storm Trooper."

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Source: Bjorn3D

Want to swap out a case fan? NZXT can help with that

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 26, 2011 - 03:01 PM |
Tagged: nzxt, FX140, FX120, FS200-R, fans

If you have a case fan you want to replace due to poor performance, loud operation or any other reason, NZXT has some nice new options for you.  If you need 120mm, 140mm or even 200mm; their new offerings will meet your needs.  Legit Reviews tested all three, the two smaller FX series might be a little noisy but they do deliver results.  The large FS-200, if you can fit it into your case is much quieter and still pushes a serious amount of air.  Check the full review here.

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"For the first two products today, we have two of NZXT's newest entries to the cooling fan market; the FX Series of fans are Enthusiast grade products with Fluid Dynamic Bearings and high performance specs. With high RPM fans with huge static pressure and airflow ratings, NZXT's looking to capitalize on those who need well built, high performing fans for their multi-GPU or CPU cooling solutions. The FX Series of fans specialize in Airflow & Static Pressure allowing them to maximize the cooling potential of any radiator or heatsink. The FX Enthusiast Series fans from NZXT come with 3 speed, dip-switch controls to adjust fan speed between low (5v), medium (7v), & high (12v) settings. We'll be looking at both the FX-120 and FX-140 models in today's review, which is very exciting for me, as it's one of the few 140mm fans to come out in recent years that actually uses a standard 140mm frame instead of a custom design..."

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Just smack the drives in until they fit, the Hammer HPTX enclosure from Lian Li

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 20, 2011 - 06:14 PM |
Tagged: Lian Li PC-P90, hammer, Lian Li

The Lian Li PC-P90, also known as the Hammer, is a vertically challenged HPTX case.  An HPTX case is a rare bird, but is used in server builds as well as anyone wanting the Extreme Machine from the HWLB as the EVGA SR-2 happens to be an HPTX board.  At 230mm (0") by 512mm (20") x 489mm (19") the Hammer is a little shorter than most case that support board of this form factor but Lian Li has managed to pull it off, as well as leaving space for 10 expansion slots and up to a dozen 3.5" disk drives.  TechPowerUp was very disappointed with the fact that the expansion slots on the back of the enclosure did not match the SR-2's slots, but did find some nice things to say about it.

You can find a review of the perfect heatsink to go in this case at Hardware Secrets.

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"HPTX cases are usually so tall that they do not fit under a normal desk. Lian Li - the company who first offered such a chassis - has managed to shrink things down to mid tower size while still offering HPTX compatibility and the ability to install up to 12 hard drives. We rip the case apart to see how everything is suppose to fit in such cramped spaces."

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Source: TechPowerUp

Thermaltake Oversees Production of New Overseer RX-1 e-Sports Computer Case

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 20, 2011 - 11:08 AM |
Tagged: thermaltake, mid tower, gaming, case

Case and processor heatsink manufacturer, Thermaltake, recently announced a new gaming centric computer case under their e-Sports lineup. The new Overseer RX-1 case is a full tower design with lots of external ports and airflow options. Set to debut in September, the company claims that the steel (SECC) chassis is made specifically for e-Sports fanatics, and lives up to the full tower name with dimensions of 21.1 x 8.7 x 22.8 inches.

Overseer RX-1.jpg

The exterior of the case is dark black with blue LED accents. The top of the case features ridges and two 20mm fan mounts. The top of the case also features a top loading hard drive hot swap bay, two internal USB 3.0 connections, two USB 2.0 connections, and one eSATA port. The front of the case includes a “breath” logo and 20mm fan both back-lit by blue LEDs, as well as four externally accessible 5.25” bays. The fan cover is a black mesh grill with the Thermaltake logo in the center. In total, the case supports six fan mounts. In addition to the previously mentioned fans, there are two optional mounts on the bottom and side panel, and one rear 120mm fan.

The internals are gamer friendly, and support graphics cards up to 12.5” in length. Painted the same dark black as the outside of the case, the interior of the case features a bottom mounted power supply (PSU), six 3.5” drive bays (one externally accessible), three 5.25” bays, a multitude of expansion card slots, two access holes for external water cooling radiators, and tool-free installation for the 5.25” bays. Other notable features include cable management holes, 3.5” bay carriages that are also compatible with 2.5” SSDs, a PSU dust filter, and a front fan dust filter (both removable).

The full tower gaming case is slated to debut worldwide in September, and while its looks are certainly subjective, it does have a lot going for it if you’re into the stylized aesthetics. Unfortunately, there is no word yet on MSRP.  More photos of the case can be found on its product page.

Source: Thermaltake

This lower end OCZ PSU features some high end insides

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 15, 2011 - 02:22 PM |
Tagged: PSU, ocz, OCZ ZS series

If you are looking for a really good deal for a power supply, consider the OCZ ZS Series 650W PSU, currently $65 thanks to a MIR at NewEgg.  The price will fool you as to the quality of the PSU, though don't expect perfection at this price point.  The ZS series seems to be a mix of both good and bad, with good efficiency and stable power in all but one condition.  TechPowerUp did not like the low maximum operating temperature and would also like to see longer cabling.   Take a peek at it in their review, but you should probably only consider the PSU at the discount price, there are better alternatives at the full $90 price tag

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"OCZ is very busy lately releasing new PSU models. Today we have the chance to test the OCZ ZS 650W. The main difference compared to the bigger ZS 750W, besides capacity, is the reduced number of available PCIe connectors, only two. Like all ZS units it has 80 PLUS Bronze efficiency, its OEM is Sirfa and it uses a non-modular cabling design."

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Source: TechPowerUp

Antec's barely there LanBoy Air

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 13, 2011 - 06:13 PM |
Tagged: antec, lanboy air yellow

The new Antec LanBoy Air Yellow has a very different look to.  The exterior is almost entirely mesh apart from some very yellow highlights and the design is modular allowing you to remove parts of the case for easy access.  There are quite a few fans installed by default with space for more and two rubber grommets on the back allow for an external radiator for those who prefer liquid cooling.  RealWorldLabs warns that the over $200 price tag may scare some off but they feel the case is worth every penny.

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"The latest Antec offering in their gamers PC case line called the LanBoy Air doesn't only feature a modular design never seen before, very good build quality, low weight and superior airflow but it also allows you to customize pretty much every aspect of it in order to meet your exact needs."

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Enermax - They've gone to platinum!

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 7, 2011 - 06:49 PM |
Tagged: enermax, 80 platinum, platimax 1200W, kilowatt, modular psu

Enermax has really taken the cake with their new Platimax 1200W PSU, so named because it carries an 80+ Platinum rating.  That high of an efficiency rating is very rare and is usually seen on PSUs in the 500W range but Enermax has more than doubled it.  You get over a half dozen 8pin PCIe power plugs as well as a plethora of SATA and other power plugs.  If you need this much power for your rig it is worth investigating this level of power efficiency as it will save you money eventually.  [H]ard|OCP gave this PSU a Silver Award, missing out on Gold due to pricing only.

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"Enermax is one of our long time favorite brands when it comes to PSUs. Enermax has proved over and over again that it is one of the world's premier PSU builders. Today it steps into a realm that is tough to compete in and in fact has not ever been seen by any other PSU builders as of yet. 1200 watts that is 80 Plus Platinum certified."

 

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CASES & COOLING

 

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Thermaltake's Chaser enclosure focuses on removable storage

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 6, 2011 - 03:22 PM |
Tagged: thermaltake, chaser mk-I, hotswapping

For those who take advantage of one of the features of the new generation of storage and spend a lot of time swapping hard drives in and out, finding a case can be hard.  Many will have a single easily accessed eSATA port and possibly a hotswappable drive bay or two that are not terribly hard to get at but not many cases make hotswapping drives the main priority.  Thermaltake has changed this with the $160 Chaser MK-1 which has a SATA hard drive dock on the top of the case which can accommodate 2.5" or 3.5" drives, four easily accessed 5.25" bays on the front and a nice hard drive cage inside that can handle up to six 3.5" drives.  Unfortunately Hardware Bistro discovered a major design flaw in that hard drive cage; there are no integral SATA plugs for power or data transfer, which defeats the purpose of the hotswap rack altogether.

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"Thermaltake is a well known computer peripheral vendor specialize in thermal & cooling. Chassis is one of the famous line of business as its uniqueness and creativity make them as the market leader. In May 2011 Thermaltake just released Chaser MK-1 chassis; a brand new full ATX tower series which is integrated with a HDD docking station within the chassis as its major unique selling point."

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CASES & COOLING

 

A new cooler company on the market; is Phanteks phantastic?

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 1, 2011 - 12:59 PM |
Tagged: phanteks, air cooling, PH-F140TS, PH-TC14PE

Over at eTechnix you can catch a review of two cooler from Phanteks, who have just entered the enthusiast cooling market.  They sport some impressive acronyms like P.A.T.S (Physical Anti-oxidant Thermal Shield) and C.P.S.C (Cold Plasma Spraying Coating) to describe their coolers and their fans have UFB (Updraft Floating Balance) bearings.  Part of that alphabet soup means that the coolers can come in a variety of colours apart from black or bare metal.  Their Phanteks PH-F140TS is a 140mm fan sold separately which can be mounted with noise reducing screws or attached to a PCI slot with the included adapter.  The PH-TC14PE is a 1250g dual tower heatsink that can use up to three of the 140mm fans and provides some very competitive cooling.  Phanteks seems to be a name we will be hearing more about and seeing near the top of cooling shoot outs with some of the other big name coolers.

eT_phtc14pe.jpg

"Today we will be reviewing the 140mm Phanteks PH-F140TS fan. The 9 bladed F140TS is designed for use with CPU coolers and as a case fan. It uses an UFB (Updraft Floating Balance) bearing which should ensure low noise and a healthy lifespan hence the low 19dbA acoustic rating and greater than 150,000 hours MTBF. Offering a rated speed of 1200RPM (+/- 10%) and whopping 78.1 CFM of airflow, this is one fan that we definitely are keen to observe in action. The fan comes in 4 different colours; red, blue, orange and white guaranteeing compatibility with every type of case and colour scheme."

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CASES & COOLING

Source: eTechnix

Thermaltake's new case proves that good things can come in small packages

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 26, 2011 - 01:09 PM |
Tagged: SFF, mITX

The Thermaltake Element Q Mini-ITX case measures just 13" x 8.7" x 5.1" but still manages to have space for a DVD/BluRay drive along with the rest of the required parts of your PC, though you are going to have a hard time using anything but onboard graphics.  The price is also small, $65 for a miniITX case is a great deal, especially when it looks as good as teh Element Q.  For any sort of SFF or HTPC project this case is a great way to start; as The Tech Report proves in their recent review.

TR_ElementQ .jpg

"For just $65, Thermaltake's Element Q Mini-ITX chassis offers a 200W PSU, support for 5.25" optical drives, and subtle styling reminiscent of the Golf GTI. We take a closer look to see if this really is the PC equivalent of a hot hatchback."

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CASES & COOLING

Two PSUs are better than one

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 26, 2011 - 10:57 AM |
Tagged: PSU, enthusiast, dual PSU, DIY

[H]ard|OCP visits the weird world of dual PSU products, which allow the usage of two PSUs in a single system and which are transparent to the end user as they are both controlled as if there was only one.  There are four methods covered; Add2Psu, the Lian Li Secondary Power Supply Starter Kit and both auxiliary and redundant PSUs.  They range in style from the impressive abilities of Add2Psu to string together unlimited amounts of PSU using Molex connectors and Lian Li's PSU crossover cable to FSP's 5.25" Booster X5 450W auxiliary PSU and the Athena Atlas 800 redundant PSU which seems more at home in the server room. If you want more power but don't have a PSU big enough this will show you how to give your existing PSU a helping hand.

h_dualPSU.jpg

"Putting two powers supplies in your computer has been a recurring subject in our forums for years. While the physical process of making that happen is not exactly rocket science, it still can be daunting for some users. Today we show you a few products that make it easy for anyone to double up on the power should your wattage needs increase."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Corsair's new enclosure family

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 23, 2011 - 12:02 PM |
Tagged: corsair, Carbide 400R, h100, h80

 The Corsair Carbide 400R enclosure is constructed of steel, apart from rubber for grommets, feet and drive mounts and is surprisingly light for such a sturdy enclosure.  The grommets for watercooling are plentiful with Corsair even describing the best way to set up the case using either their H100 or H80 self contained water coolers.  At the top of the front you will find audio ports, two USB 3.0 headers and a Firewire port in addition to activity LEDs and a power button.  What impressed Legit Reviews even more than the light weight was the MSRP of $100, making the case affordable for those who can't bring themselves to spend $150+ on an enclosure.

Carbide400R-main.jpg

"Corsair simply nailed it with the Carbide Series 400R mid-tower case. The first thing I noticed taking this steel case out of the box was it is fairly light at under 16 pounds! It was very sturdy and I didn't feel like I was going to be breaking plastic parts while reviewing the case. The elegant sleek design may escape you are first look but it is certainly there. It may take the first time for you to see the PC turned on to see how well it works with the white LED lights provided on the front panels and front case fans. Sure it only comes with three fan to start but if you are feeling creative you can have up to ten to create a wind tunnel in your Corsair Carbide Series 400R."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Corsair takes fan testing seriously

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 21, 2011 - 02:31 PM |
Tagged: visit, fan, corsair

I have been wandering around the Bay area for the last several days and stopped in to see some of our favorite hardware and technology companies.  We saw a lot of really interesting things that we can't quite discuss yet, but this machine we found in the Corsair testing labs was kind of interesting.  Have you ever wondered how fans get all those ratings like CFMs, dBAs and speed curves?

fanthing1.jpg

Meet the LongWin LW-9266 Fan Performance Measurement Apparatus.  Not something from Aperture Science as you might guess, this device lets Corsair test new fan options for their heatsinks, cases and H-series liquid coolers to find those that are the quietest, the most efficient and the provide the best pressure results for cooling particular heatsinks, etc.

fanthing2.jpg

The idea is simple enough - connect a fan (or a fan behind a heatsink) to the end of the LW-9266 and turn on the machine, set some variables and let it go.  Air is pushed by the fan into the blue chamber up to and another fan blower moves air in the same direction to equalize pressure, thus it can tell how much air is actually being moved.

fanthing3.jpg

The whole process is quite a bit more complicated that I am making it out to be of course - I just got the crash course.  Interestingly, this Delta fan they were showing off for me was so loud, it droned out the rest of the testing contraption completely.  Air speed = high, noise = high.  I didn't need a machine for that.

fanthing4.jpg

Here is a sample result from a previous fan test that shows some performance results.  Other than the cool factor here, there isn't much to report, but it is good to see Corsair making investments in actually TESTING stuff they are selling to consumers rather than taking OEMs word on specifications, etc. 

Source: Corsair

Who needs software control when you can roll your own fan controller?

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 18, 2011 - 05:56 PM |
Tagged: fan controller, pwm, DIY

Even with the fancy drivers now that allow you to set a minimum fan speed you will find that it is almost impossible to completely turn the fan off.  If you desire to do so, it is almost impossible to turn the fan completely off, which is something that is almost impossible with either a software solution or with a PWM controller.  Over at Hack a Day you can find instructions on how to create a breadboard project which translates PWM signal to DC and will allow you much greater control over your fan speed.

pwm_to_dc_fan_control.jpg

"[hedgehoginventions] wrote in to share a little modification he made to his video card in order to keep it from overheating during strenuous 3D tasks. Having swapped out the stock cooler on his Nvidia 9600GT graphics card, he found that it did not need to utilize the fan while doing mundane things like checking email, but that it still required extra air flow while playing games.

He figured he get the fan to shut off by tweaking the PWM signal, but he found that he could not get the duty cycle under 20% using software, which still caused the fan to run at all times. The circuit he built takes the PWM signal output by the card, cleaning it up before converting it to a corresponding DC voltage. The fan then runs at the same speed it would if driven directly by the PWM signal, though it can now turn off completely when not required."

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CASES & COOLING

Source: Hack a Day