CoolerMaster's BIG new enclosure, the HAF XM

Subject: Cases and Cooling | April 24, 2012 - 03:10 PM |
Tagged: coolermaster, HAF XM, eatx

With holes for Micro-ATX, ATX and E-ATX motherboards, the new CoolerMaster HAF XM has a lot of space for you to fill.  At 252 x 530.5 x 579mm (9.9" x 20.9" x 22.8") you can use the four 200mm fans, and single 120mm and 140mm to give yourself serious air cooling or if you prefer watercooling there is space for a radiator with two 140mm fans up top and a 140mm fan radiator at the back.  There are a total of 20 drive bays, with a mix of 5.25", 3.5" and even 2.5" drives for your SSDs and even with the large drive cage installed you can still squeeze in a GPU of up to 13.9"; without you have space for a 18.2" card!  Drop by Modders Inc for the full review of this case, slated for release at $130.

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"For the year 2012 Cooler Master is furthering it's endeavor to create the ultimate High Air Flow chassis for all gaming and computer enthusiasts alike. Yes, I am talking about the Cooler Master HAF series of computer cases."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Source: Modders Inc

Just Delivered: Corsair K60 & K90 Vengeance Mech Keyboards Type Hard, Type Harder, Type Hard: With a Vengeance

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling, Systems | April 21, 2012 - 01:24 AM |
Tagged: mechanical keyboard, corsair

Just Delivered is a class of articles at PC Perspective where we share what crosses into our offices, labs, houses, or pseudo-classified locations with crummy internet. Today we look at the Corsair Vengeance line of mechanical keyboards. We have received both the K60 FPS keyboard as well as the K90 MMO keyboard.

Some people say that when you try a mechanical keyboard, something just clicks.

That is not really the case for the Corsair Vengeance line of keyboards which use the linear Cherry MX Red switches. The key gives a light constant resistence until it hits bottom. Check out our explanation of the various type of switches from a few months ago to see the differences between Cherry MX switches.

corsairkeyboard.jpg

Seems quite odd, grammatically, to enter a market of new competitors with a Vengeance...

Just saying...

First impressions are that Corsair really put some thought and effort into these keyboards. Wrist rests snap into place and, in the K90's case, get screwed in for total stability. The brushed metal top is a great touch and gives the feeling of quality.

Each keyboard has a few non-mechanical keys which slightly take away from that feeling -- but that will be discussed in a more formal review setting.

corsairkeyboard2.jpg

Just for irony... I might play Wing Commander: Privateer as part of the Corsair review.

While Corsair to some extent markets these keyboards at different audiences -- it really does seem at first glance like the K90 is a direct upgrade to the K60, rather than a sidegrade. Apart from the custom shaped WSAD keys and the wrist rest, I cannot see much reason to go for the K60 over the K90 except for price.

That said, we shall find out for sure in the full review to be started shortly.

Source: PCPer

Enermax offers you the full monty with their giant new enclosure

Subject: Cases and Cooling | April 18, 2012 - 05:06 PM |
Tagged: enermax, fulmogt jumbo, htpx

At 674 x 235 x 640mm (26.5" x 9.2" x 25.2") the Enermax FulmoGT Jumbo can handle even HPTX motherboards and would be a perfect for a dual CPU, multiple GPU system build since you will have no troubles fitting the system in the case.  You even have enough space to fit in a secondary PSU without taking up so much space you couldn't fit a full watercooling system inside if the 18cm and 23cm fans are not to your liking.  [H]ard|OCP would have liked to see more solid materials used in some of the sides of the case but overall they were very impressed with the cooling capabilities of the case.

H_Fullmo.jpg

"Big, bigger, biggest. Enermax pulls out all the stops with one of the largest "desktop" computer cases on the market today. If expansion room, oversized HPTX motherboards, and plenty of cooling options are on your list of needs when it comes to a chassis, The FulmoGT may just fit the bill."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Little machines need little PSUs; Seasonic's new TFX PSU

Subject: Cases and Cooling | April 16, 2012 - 06:40 PM |
Tagged: seasonic, SS-350TGM, PSU, TFX, SFF

The PSU that you have come to know in your desktop is an ATX PSU but that is not the only choice, as server techs and SFF builders are well aware.  One of the alternative standards is the TFX which retains the ATX electrical and connection specs but fits it into a 5.75" × 3.25" × 2.5" (146 x 83 x 64mm) casing.  The 350W Seasonic SS-350TGM is not designed for SLI/CrossFire systems, indeed it does not have a single PCIe connector of any type which is not a problem for the type of machine this is intended for.  If you are planning on building an ITX box with an internal PSU, or even a small custom built case, you really should drop by [H]ard|OCP to check this little PSU out.

H_seasonic_tiny.jpg

"Today we tackle something a bit off the beaten path for us; a low power non-ATX specification power supply from Seasonic. We do know that many of our readers build systems that are not like all the others especially when it comes to crafting smaller purpose driven boxes. The 300TGM may be just what you are looking for."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Zalman joins the self contained watercooling apparatus crowd

Subject: Cases and Cooling | April 11, 2012 - 05:23 PM |
Tagged: zalman, CNPS 20LQ, watercooling

The Zalman CNPS 20LQ is more than just a noise prevention system, it is a self contained and maintenance free watercooling system similar to the models that Corsair and other manufacturers provide.  With compatibility for socket AM2, AM2+, AMD3, AM3+, FM1, LGA1366, LGA1155, LGA 1156 and LGA2011 you should be able to use this cooler on any modern system without a worry.  Overclock3D gave the cooler a try on a overclocked i7-950 and were quite impressed with the results when the fan was running at full speed, however the noise they describe being generated does not sound at all pleasant.  At a reduced speed the cooler became quiet but the cooling power was also diminished.  Still, they liked the cooling ability of Zalman's first foray into this particular market.

oc3d_zalmanh2o.JPG

"Zalman have been in the cooler business for quite some time now and have established a name for themselves in the production of more esoteric coolers and external reserator systems. Going a bit more mainstream (if we can call sealed system liquid cooling systems mainstream) Zalman have released a stand alone maintenance free system. Combining a integral pump and head with a radiator and fan. The CNPS moniker indicates that this is badged as a "Computer Noise Prevention System" and as such we should expect low noise as well as low temperatures. Lets take a look at the vital statistics shall we."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Source: Overclock3D

Composite Copper and Graphene to make a cool couple.

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling | April 10, 2012 - 06:03 PM |
Tagged: graphene, cooling

Researchers at NC State University have tested the heat dissipation properties of copper-graphene. Their findings suggest that the material could be cheaper and more effective than pure copper.

Some people have gone to ridiculous lengths to cool their components. Some people flush their coolant regularly. Some people will never live down mineral oil jokes. No two computers are not on fire. Awwww.

Copper is regularly used as a method of dissipating heat as it is highly efficient when sufficiently pure. While copper is expensive, it is not expensive enough to be prohibitive for current use. Alternatives are still being explored and a researcher at NC State University believes graphene might be part of the answer.

bathroomsuctionfan.jpg

Some people stick a bathroom suction fan out a window and run a 3” drier hose into their case.

As always, I become immediately skeptical when a team of researchers make a claim such as this. Whether or not these issues are valid have yet to be seen, but they come to mind none-the-less. The paper claims that the usage is designed for power amplifiers and laser diodes.

My first concern is with geometry. Effective cooling is achieved by exposing as much surface area between two materials as is possible for the situation. Higher heat conductance allows heat to get away much more efficiently, but the heat still needs to be removed to a reservoir of some sort, such as your room. There has not been much talk about the possibilities to then remove the heat after copper-graphene so efficiently sucks from the heat source.

My second concern is with the second layer of indium-graphene. While it seems as though the amount of indium required is quite small -- just a single layer between the heat source and the copper-graphene -- we do not really know for certain how that relates to real world applications. Indium is still a very rare element which is heavily mined for touch screen devices. It might prove to be cheap, but there is only so much of it. Would we also be able to reclaim the Indium later, or will it end up in a landfill?

These concerns are probably quite minor but it is generally good practice to not get too excited when you see a research paper. Two points if you see any of the following: Nano, Graphene or Carbon Nanotubes, Lasers, and anything related to High-Frequency.

Wireless Headsets and PC Cases Added To Vengeance Lineup

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling | April 5, 2012 - 03:47 PM |
Tagged: vengeance, headset, gaming, corsair, case

Corsair announced today that a new wireless headset and gaming PC case would be joining the ranks of the existing Vengeance lineup of headsets and keyboards. Making their initial debut at PAX East this weekend, the new Vengeance 2000 wireless headset and Vengeance C70 Case will be available for purchase later this year.

The Vengeance 2000 is Corsair’s latest headset that takes the brushed aluminum, 50mm drivers, and microfiber ear cups of the Vengeance 1500, adds some blue and white accents and then cuts the cord. In pace of the USB cord, Corsair utilizes 2.4 GHz wireless to deliver 5.1 and 7.1 virtual surround sound up to 40 feet away and with a battery life of 10 hours. The headset further features a noise canceling microphone and battery that can be recharged via micro USB cable.

V2000_left.png

From the wording of the press release, it sounds like the charging cable will only act as a power cable -- meaning it will not make the headset wired. The wireless 2.4GHz radio may be problematic for gamers living in areas with lots of 2.4GHz interference (like an apartment building with lots of WiFi devices and microwaves), and in that case the wired Vengeance 1500 would be a better choice. (We are attempting to verify the wireless only aspects and will update the article if we receive a response). Update: Corsair has clarified to us that the headset is always wireless -- the USB cable is only used for charging and firmware flashing.

Arriving with two carrying handles and an ammo box aesthetic, the Vengeance C70 is ready for the war against heat with space for up to 240mm radiators (they suggest the H100) on the top and bottom or 10 total case fans. The case further features a steel front panel, eight PCI-E slots, and two removable hard drive cages with space for three 2.5” or 3.5” drives (for a total of six hard drives). The PCI-E slots and other internals use standard Philips head screws.

C70_G_handlesUP.png

The Vengeance C70 will be available in three colors: Military Green, Arctic White, Gunmetal Black. The external of the the case features large mesh grills over the fan areas. The front of the case features a honeycomb mesh for up to two fans, three 5.25” drive bays, and -- along the top -- two large buttons for power and reset with the power being the large red button (which would be difficult to resist pressing all the time). It also houses microphone and headphone jacks, and two USB 3.0 ports. All three C70 cases have two carrying handles on the top that fold down into recessed parts of the case when not being used.

C70_all3.png

The two new Vengeance entrants will be available this summer. The C70 will be available for purchase soonest -- as early as May -- with an MSRP of $139 USD. Meanwhile, the Vengeance 2000 wireless headset has an MSRP of $149 USD and will be available in June. More information on Corsair’s entire Vengeance gaming lineup is available here.

Source: Corsair

CM Storm QuickFire Pro: Full NKRO over USB?

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling | April 4, 2012 - 04:51 PM |
Tagged: cooler master, mechanical keyboard

Cooler Master announces the Cooler Master Storm QuickFire Pro mechanical keyboard available soon in four different CHERRY flavors. They claim full N-Key Rollover (NKRO) through USB, which is a first to my knowledge.

Higher-end keyboards seem to be growing further and further in fashion as of late.

Cooler Master jumped into the mechanical keyboard market with their QuickFire Rapid release in late 2011. The Rapid was available in Cherry MX Blue and Cherry MX Red switches. The Rapid was a Tenkeyless design, sparing you the width of a number pad if you do not wish to have one.

cm-storm.jpg

Of course only the Pro keyboard would have a numpad… only accountants use it or something.

Cooler Master has obviously found that the Rapid a successful product as they will launch a sister design allegedly sometime this month. The Storm QuickFire Pro is a partially backlit full-sized keyboard. The Rapid Pro will be available in Cherry MX Blue, MX Brown, MX Black, and MX Red switch designs. If you are curious about the differences between keyboard switches then check out my explanation in the Rosewill RK-9000v2 review.

The most interesting feature of this keyboard is their claim of full NKRO through USB. Traditionally in order to press every button down on a keyboard you are limited to using a PS/2 connection. Recent research at Microsoft increased the USB limit to approximately 18 keys from the usual 6kro. I would be curious to see someone put that keyboard through Aquakey to verify those claims.

The QuickFire Pro is expected to have an MSRP of $99.99. If they are like other keyboard manufacturers, that likely depends on the switch used.

Can CoolerMaster actually provide 1300W of Silent power

Subject: Cases and Cooling | April 3, 2012 - 06:50 PM |
Tagged: Silent Pro Hybrid 1300, modular psu, kilowatt, coolermaster, 80 Plus Gold

It seems hard to imagine that a PSU that provides more than a kilowatt of power can be considered quiet but Cooler Master goes even further with their Silent Pro Hybrid 1300 Watt PSU.  Rated for 80 Plus Gold and able to provide 1260W @ 105A on its single 12V rail this beast of a PSU and its eight 6+2 pin PCIe power connectors should be able to power any graphics system you might want to dream of setting up.  Part of the Silent comes from a unique fanless mode, when load is under 200 watts and the temperature below 25C the fan powers off.  The other modes are manual and auto, which anyone with a recent video card will be familiar with.  From the 5 year warranty to the solid power that this PSU provides, Hi Tech Legion found a lot of things to like about this premium PSU.
 

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"With the Silent Pro Hybrid 1300 Watt PSU, Cooler Master has actually added usability features to a category typically limited to simply watts and amps. The Cooler Master Silent Pro Hybrid 1300 Watt PSU goes beyond being an 80+ Gold, 105A single 12V rail behemoth, and incorporates a 7V chassis fan rail along with a 5.25” Dual Fan Control Module. After all, if you have need for 1300 watts of power, odds are good you are going to have more than a fan or two running in your case, and what better place to power and control them from than directly from the PSU? In addition to a single-channel, continuously variable controller for up to three chassis fans, the fan control module offers PSU fan control in addition to “PSU Fanless Mode”."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Grab a white BMW for $115 ... Thermaltake's Level 10 GTS Snow Edition

Subject: Cases and Cooling | April 3, 2012 - 03:18 PM |
Tagged: thermaltake, Level 10 GTS Snow Edition, atx

The 233 x 462 x 510mm Thermaltake GTS Snow Edition takes the familiar enclosure and reverses its colour to a very striking white.  With up to six fans, including a 200mm, as well as 3 grommets for external watercooling you have a choice on your cooling solution.  External drive bays make hotswapping a breeze and the USB 2.0 and 3.0 ports are easily accessible as well, not counting the external connectors on your motherboard.  Neoseeker found many things to like about this enclosure as well as a few areas they'd like to see improved but overall were quite impressed with this $115 BMW inspired case.

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"Thermaltake lets its snow once again in its Level 10 lineup of cases with the Snow Edition of its Level 10 GTS, sporting its striking white and black color scheme. Perhaps its most defining feature is the distinct hot swap drive bay system for hard drives. See how it all works in our review of the Level 10 GTS Snow Edition case, geared toward enthusiasts who don't want to spend top dollar for a Level 10 series product but still rock all the style."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Source: Neoseeker

The fine waterline between genius and madness; toilet water PC cooling

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling | April 3, 2012 - 12:01 PM |
Tagged: case mods, watercooling, toilet, couric

When Google discusses using toilet water to cool a data centre, they don't exactly mean it in the way that this case mod went, but the latter is certainly easier to set up at home.  Other such inventive cooling solutions have been tried, after all what good is it if the weather outside is -40o if you don't have it vented through to your PCs intake fan?  However this is probably the first time someone popped a water pump into a toilet reservoir to use as an open cooling loop for a PC.  With a slight change to the tubing, you could probably ensure you never have to sit down on a cold seat again. ExtremeTech has pictures of the system and its creator here.

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"Hot on the heels of news that Google uses toilet water to cool one of its data centers, it has emerged that an enterprising hardware hacker had the same idea some seven years ago. As you will see in the following pictures, though, Jeff Gagnon’s computer is much more than a toilet-cooled rig — it’s a case mod tour de force."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: ExtremeTech

Arctic Cooling's AMD only Freezer A30

Subject: Cases and Cooling | March 27, 2012 - 01:53 PM |
Tagged: arctic cooling, amd, freezer a30

Sometimes cooler manufacturers target one of their products specifically to a CPU manufacturer and that is what Arctic Cooling has done with the Freezer A30.  This 905g, 162mm x 137mm x 97mm is only designed to fit Socket AM2+, AM3+ and FM1 motherboards, which allows for greater flexibility in the orientation of the mounting brackets.  FrostyTech tested it with the fan at both high and low speed settings and found this to be a great heatsink both for high powered systems that need a lot of cooling as well as those systems which need to operate quietly.

FT_FCFreezerA30_p.jpg

"The Freezer A30 heatsink is an updated version of the AC Freezer 13 Pro, but this time around it's shed its copper base plate for bare heatpipes and had its mounting brackets restricted to AMD processors. The Freezer A30 stands 162mm tall, is built around a familiar tower-style-exposed-heatpipe-heatsink format and weighs a hefty 905 grams. The cooler comes with a single 120mm PWM fan which is mounted to the aluminum fin stack via a muscular plastic fan shroud. No additional fans can be mounted."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Source: Frosty Tech

(80+) Gold Plated PSU roundup

Subject: Cases and Cooling | March 26, 2012 - 05:22 PM |
Tagged: 80 Plus Gold, PSU, modular psu, coolermaster, Silent Pro Gold 600W, Cougar, GX G900, Cougar GX G1050, OCZ ZX 1000W, Seasonic SS-850KM

X-bit Labs assembled a wide variety of PSUs which all share one characteristic for a round up.  From the lowest powered 600W to the over the top 1050W model, these PSUs all have an 80 Plus Gold rating.  You have probably seen the Seasonic, OCZ and CoolerMaster PSUs around before but the Cougar models are a little less common.  All but the Seasonic model generated positive reviews, the problem with the Seasonic model being its price; it costs more than the others but does not offer extras to justify that heightened price point.  The 600W PSUs are definitely recommended as many mid-range PSUs do not sport the 80 Plus Gold rating.  Read on to see how stable the power they provide is.

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"Today we are going to talk about five power supply units from Cooler Master, Cougar, OCZ and Seasonic certified according to 80 PLUS Gold standard. Their wattage ranges from 600 to 1050 W, which provides a choice to everyone who is looking for a quality PSU."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Source: X-Bit Labs

Colorful Raspberry Pi Cases and Set Up Kits Emerge

Subject: Cases and Cooling | March 21, 2012 - 10:41 PM |
Tagged: Raspberry Pi, case, 3d printing

The Raspberry Pi Foundation recently released their ARM powered Linux computer; however, the accompanying case will not be available until later this year. As a result, many enthusiasts are stepping up to the plate to design and fabricate cases of their own for the Raspberry Pi board. Previously, Marco Alici designed a white case with Raspberry Pi logo that could be produced using injection molding techniques (or 3D printers). Now, a new site called Mod My Pi has emerged to offer modders some alternative cases along with start up kits full of all the accessories people need to get their Raspberry Pi board up and running.

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Based in the UK, the Raspberry Pi enthusiasts are employing 3D printing technology to produce customizable cases based on ABS Plastic. Further, they are offering up a variety of color choices including blue, red, green, black, and white. Customers can choose two colors to mix an match, one for the top of the case and another for the bottom. The cases are form fitting and are designed to be dust and water resistant. They come as two parts that snap together to nestle the Raspberry Pi board safely. The bottom and side opposite the Ethernet jack provide plenty of vent holes to keep the board from overheating.

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If you have a design idea including a specific color or specific logo that you would like to incorporate into your Raspberry Pi case, Mod My Pi has stated that it is willing to work with customers to allow customization of cases to make them even more personalized.

The cases are currently up for pre-order, but are set to begin shipping via First Class Royal Mail for UK orders or through Royal Mail Airmail Small Packets for International orders. Shipping prices will be £1.99 for both UK and International orders, though International orders will naturally take a bit longer to arrive.

In addition to cases, Mod My Pi has put together a start up kit for those in the UK to complement the Raspberry Pi that includes everything a user will need to get the ARM computer up and running, except a display of course. The kit features a Raspberry Pi case, an 8 GB SD card with Debian Linux distribution, small wireless keyboard, wireless mouse, powered 7 port USB 2.0 hub, USB Wi-Fi dongle, USB card reader, 5 V 1000mA UK AC power adapter, micro USB to USB cable, RCA video and audio cables, HDMI cable, and Ethernet cable.

The setup kit is priced at £64.99 including VAT taxes and has a UK only shipping price of £4.99.

Even better, Mod My Pi is donating 5% of all sales of cases, and all profits from Mod My Pi stickers to the official Raspberry Pi Foundation (the charity behind the Raspberry Pi computer). Have you received your Raspberry Pi pre-orders yet? What will you be using for a case, will you be DIYing your own, or will you going with someone else's design?  On an unrelated note, there is so much Raspberry Pi in this news post, that I'm getting pretty hungry!

More Raspberry Pi reading:

Source: Mod My Pi

Antec's Mid-Sized 1100 enclosure can hold a lot of hardware

Subject: Cases and Cooling | March 19, 2012 - 02:52 PM |
Tagged: antec, eleven hundred

The Antec 1100 enclosure is a mid-tower design but with enough space inside to accommodate an XL-ATX board as well as coolers of up to 170mm (6.7").  The included cooling is impressive, with a possible nine 120mm fans installable though it only comes with two.  There are six 3.5" drive bays, two 2.5" bays and three 5.25" bays, with the HDD bays set up front to back, sideways from the usual case design.  [H]ard|OCP did have a few improvements to the case that they would have liked Antec to include but as the case walked away with a Silver Award, those additions would simply make a good case even better.   If you are shopping for a $100 enclosure that can handle SSDs without adapters then you should check out their review.

H_1100.jpg

"We take a long [H]ard look at Antec's new Eleven Hundred model chassis that is billed by Antec as being "The Advanced Gaming Authority." This relatively inexpensive DIY chassis is chock full of features and represents a flagship in the Antec line. Our new testing format takes its maiden voyage on the Eleven Hundred."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Are you SMART to choose Thermaltake's new 730W PSU?

Subject: Cases and Cooling | March 15, 2012 - 02:49 PM |
Tagged: PSU, thermaltake, Thermaltake SMART 730W

The Thermaltake SMART 730W PSU looks a little bare compared to some of the competition out there right now; it is not modular, only meets the basic 80 Plus certification and the cables are not sleeved.  On the other hand, it is a single 12V rail design with 56A available for the four 6+2 pin PCIe connectors and with a 120mm fan it should run relatively quietly.  TechPowerUp put the PSU through their battery of tests and came out with a fairly negative conclusion.  At $100, the crossload and ripple test results were disappointing as was its ability to provide power when running at 40C or higher.  This PSU has a serious case of the 'just good enoughs' and should perhaps be passed over in favour of other PSUs at the same price point.

TPU_psu_standby2.jpg

"The new Thermaltake SMART series is a value series so it consists of budget units that according to Thermaltake incorporate high-tech components with Eco-friendly credentials. The capacities of the SMART units range from 430W to 730W and in this review we will test the strongest model with 730W capacity."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Source: TechPowerUp

Lian Li Releases Official Photos of PC-QO5 Case

Subject: Cases and Cooling | March 13, 2012 - 04:33 AM |
Tagged: thin itx, mini ITX, Lian Li PC-Q05, Lian Li, case, aluminum

Lian Li, a case maker specializing in sleek brushed aluminum computer cases showed off (video link) several cases at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas a few months ago. One of the cases they touted was an extremely thin aluminum case that conforms to Intel's Thin Mini-ITX form factor. The super small case employs indirect cooling much like that found in laptops and utilizes Mini-ITX motherboards that use laptop style ram. As far as physical dimensions, the chassis measures 284 mm (W) x 47 mm (H) x 307 mm (D) according to the product page.

q05-01.jpg

The silver version PC-Q05 Chassis

The new product page further details that the aluminum case has a gross weight of only 1.5 KG (about 3.3 lbs) and, in addition to housing the Mini-ITX motherboard, will hold up to two 2.5" hard drives (or SSDs). The skinny case will further be available in either silver or black colors. The front of the case is a curved piece of brushed aluminum interrupted by two status LEDs on the right of the panel (but no drive bays or buttons to speak of). The right side of the case houses the power button, and the sides and bottom of the case contain plenty of ventilation holes.

q05-08.jpg

A top down view of the internals

I have to say that this PC-Q05 case would make for a sexy home theater PC (especially the black brushed aluminum case), though the case is certainly going to limit the amount of hardware you can have at your fingertips. Unfortunately, there is no word yet on pricing or availability.

Source: Maximum PC

Need a low cost cooler for your low cost Llano?

Subject: Cases and Cooling | March 12, 2012 - 04:19 PM |
Tagged: low profile, low noise, heatsink, arctic cooling alpine 64 plus

If you spent around $100 on your CPU you are unlikely to want to spend a large percentage of that again on a high powered third party heatsink but that doesn't mean you have to stick with the cooler in the retail package.  Arctic Cooling's Alpine 64 Plus stands 69mm x 99mm x 116mm making it perfect for smaller systems and weighs in at only 430g as well.  The price is something you will love, the MSRP is $15 which should sit within anyone's budget.  FrostyTech tried it out on their testbench and as you might expect it did not top the cooling charts but did perform adequately and it was one of the quietest active coolers they've tested.

FT_ACalpine64_p.jpg

"With the release of AMD's socket FM1 Fusion A8-3850 processors late last year there's been a growing need for inexpensive yet relatively quiet CPU coolers of moderate power. The 'Llano' processor only has a 100W TDP and costs just over $120 bucks, so expensive tower heatpipe coolers can be a little bit of an overkill. Arctic Cooling's Alpine 64 Plus heatsink is one economical option to consider; it's rated for 100W and stands 70mm tall so it fits in most media PC cases with ease."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Source: Frosty Tech

A Case For The Raspberry Pi Linux Computer

Subject: Cases and Cooling | March 7, 2012 - 04:58 PM |
Tagged: Raspberry Pi, cases, computing, 3d printing

Marco Alici is not only eagerly awaiting his Raspberry Pi computer, but he is so excited that he has already started mocking up a case for it using Blender software and basic measurements of the Raspberry Pi board.

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The case is a form fitting white plastic affair that has cutouts for each of the ports and an etched Raspberry Pi logo on the top. He states that because the Raspberry Pi has been designed to be as low cost as possible, the placement of connectors on the PCB makes for a less than ideal case. The RCA jack in particular juts out quite a bit from the casing, for example. Also the Raspberry Pi PCB does not have mounting holes to make attaching the case easy; Mr Alici had to come up with a snap-fit assembly to get around that issue.

The renderings of the case were made using Blender and Yafaray. He says that he is still waiting on his physical Rasberry Pi board to finalize the design and make it available for 3D printing at Shapeways. The case further is able to be constructed using injection molding, which he says makes for a cheap to produce case. More photos are available here.  Now, if only I had a 3D printer!

Source: Marco Alici

Xigmatek thinks big with their new mATX Gigas enclosure

Subject: Cases and Cooling | March 2, 2012 - 03:01 PM |
Tagged: xigmatek gigas, xigmatek, SFF, mATX

When you build a machine based on an mATX board, you tend to be aiming for a compact system that can be hidden away or is at least small enough that it is unobtrusive.  Xigmatek decided to toss that style away when they designed the Gigas, quite possibly the only mATX enclosure which weighs more than 20lbs.  At 10.94" x 12.68" x 15.59" you have a lot of space to work with and will find space for a lot more drives than you might expect even with a full size GPU and 1kg+ heatsink.   This is a perfect enclosure for some of the high end mATX board for sale currently, but as TechPowerUp points out in their review there are no grommets for watercooling if you wanted to upgrade your cooling solution.

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"Is it a mATX chassis? No! Is it a mid-tower case? No! What is it? It is the Xigmatek Gigas! Too big to be a compact mATX cube, but too compact to be considered a mid-tower. Will the Gigas end up being the Frankenstein of cases, or manage to impress with this new approach?"

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

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Source: TechPowerUp