Gelid wants you to join the side of the DarkForce

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 27, 2012 - 01:48 PM |
Tagged: Gelid, darkforce

Gelid has expanded into the enclosure business with the mid sized DarkForce, 530x207x505mm (20.9x8.1x19.9") which might not give you as much space as other cases recently arriving on the market but for most PC builds it should be spacious enough.  The drive cage is well done, with the ability to hold 2.5" SSDs in addition to 3.5" HDDs, and for those with extra long graphics cards the cage can be completely removed from the case.   The motherboard tray has a cut out to allow easier access to your heatsink mount and there is a matching space to mount a fan on the door to help cool an area that is a dead spot in most cases.  At $120 it not expensive for a case of its size, but that is not the only reason Legit Reviews had such a positive reaction to the case.

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"The DARKFORCE mid-tower comes into a saturated field of mid-towers made for PC gamers and enthusiasts. Gelid Solution will need to take a unique approach to find ways to distinguish itself from the competitions at the entry price of $120 in the US market. After an overview of the specifications, it looks like Gelid Solutions has used its past experiences to put something a little different into this product..."

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The expanding Cosmos; Cooler Master thinks wider, taller, deeper and heavier

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 23, 2012 - 05:55 PM |
Tagged: cooler master, cosmos ii

Be warned, the obvious handles on the Cooler Master are there for a reason!  That handy lip on the front of the case is not a handle, it is a spring loaded cover for your peripheral plugs and fan controller and should not be used to pick up the case.  There are 11 card slots at the back of the case, just to give you an idea how big this case really is and in the front are 13 places to stash 3.5" or 2.5" drives.  The official measurements are 27.7" x 13.5" x 26.1" (704 x 344 x 664 mm) so you will have no problems fitting in even the largest of GPU cards.  The Tech Report is a little shocked by the $350 price tag but ended up deciding that the case was worth that much to anyone willing to pay the price.

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"Cooler Master's latest creation is a follow-up to the revered Cosmos line of enthusiast enclosures. We put this super-sized newbie through its paces to see if the Cosmos II is worthy of carrying the torch."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

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When marketers go bad; the Seventeam E-Force 750W

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 20, 2012 - 03:04 PM |
Tagged: PSU, Seventeam, E-Force 750W, 80 Plus Bronze

The Seventeam E-Force 750W did pass [H]ard|OCP's torturous PSU testing regime, with no real faults but no outstanding results either.  The real problem lays with the fact that more effort seems to have been spend marketing the PSU than was spent designing it, up to and including the fact that the single layer PCB used is labelled 'Cooler Master' and the overall build quality is of lower quality than the GX 650W that the PCB also appeared in.  In theory this should bring the price down but unless it is significantly less than similar PSUs your money could be better spend elsewhere.  Besides, do you want to support a company which labels its PSUs as "Windows 7 Ready"?

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"Seventeam is a longtime PSU builder that has just recently started focusing on the enthusiast market in North America and it shows in its marketing. Today's 750 watt power supply is touted as, "Meets ATX 12V V2.3 standard," is Windows 7 Ready, and carries the 80Plus Bronze badge that is described as 'High Efficiency.'"

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

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Source: [H]ard|OCP

NZXT Switches the Phantom for an 810

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 18, 2012 - 06:36 PM |
Tagged: nzxt, switch 810

NZXT was thinking big when they created the Switch 810, the case is 235mm x 595mm x 585 (9.25" x 23.4"x 23") so you should have no problems fitting in large CPU coolers or oversized graphics cards.  The size also accommodates 10 fans, either 120mm or 140mm or for water cooling fans a 360mm will fit perfectly.  Neoseeker are not fans of the piano black finish as it tends to feature fingerprints and dust more strongly that it does a shiny finish; in all but perfect circumstances.  Apart from their aesthetic differences though, they highly recommend the case.

Neos_810 18.jpg

"The NZXT Switch 810 builds on the success of the Phantom series, while attempting to sweeten the formula with features like a hot-swap bay, improved cable management, room for a 360mm radiator, 10 internal fans, and support for XL-ATX and E-ATX motherboards. It even comes in white if you want, like the original Phantom. Find out if the Switch 810 can live up to its predecessor in our latest case review."

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Source: Neoseeker

NZXT Launching New Switch 810 Full Tower Computer Case

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 17, 2012 - 04:34 PM |
Tagged: nzxt, full tower, computer, chassis, case, atx

NZXT, a computer case manufacturer that has been around since 2004, is today launching a new full tower computer case with the Switch 810 chassis. The new full tower case includes several features aimed at enthusiasts along with a 2 year warranty and choice of two colors (white or black). NZXT founder Johnny Hou seems confident in the case by stating that the new chassis "offers enthusiasts an array of advanced features intuitively implemented into one of the most unique designs we've ever created."

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The full tower case supports EATX motherboards with up to nine expansion slots and 375 millimeters of space for large, modern graphics cards when the front fan is removed. The motherboard tray further supports plenty of cable routing holes and a CPU back plate cut out. Further, the interior of the can can hold four 5.25" drives, six 3.5" drives, and up to 10 120mm or 140mm fans. The front, bottom, and drive bay area of the case houses two fans each. Meanwhile, the top of the case houses three cases and the rear holds one fan. Constructed of steel and plastic, the case weighs in at 9.1 Kg or about 20 lbs.

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As you can see from the outside of the case, the Switch 810 chassis supports four 5.25" drives, audio and microphone connectors, two USB 3.0 and two USB 2.0 ports, and a card reader. Also, a filter for the bottom intake can be removed from the front of the case. Some of the touted features of the new case include the ability to easily install water cooling and the new "hybrid fins" that allow users to close the fins to reduce dust and quiet the computer or open the fins along the top to maximize airflow. Tool-less drive bays, an acrylic side window, and a white LED that can be switched on or off are also features of the Switch 810 case.

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The NZXT switch is available now for $169.99 USD. More information and photos of the case can be found here. What do you think of the new case, are you impressed with the "hybrid design?"

NZXT_Switch_810.png

The proposed airflow diagram for the new NZXT case.

Source: NZXT

A platinum rated kilowatt class PSU from Kingwin

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 12, 2012 - 02:27 PM |
Tagged: PSU, Kingwin, LZP-1000, kilowatt, 80 Plus Platinum, modular psu

For those systems with multiple GPUs and serious storage a 500W PSU just won't cut it, you need to look to the 1000W+ models.   Of course with great power comes great cost, so having an 80 Plus Platinum rating can be a good thing.  The Kingwin LZP-1000 will give you both the power and efficiency with modular cabling to ensure your case stays nice and clean.  At the sticker price of $230 [H]ard|OCP calls this PSU a steal, top notch performance at a bargain price.  Check out this Gold Award winning PSU at [H].

H_Kingwin1000.jpg

"Kingwin does not bring a huge number of power supplies for review, but when it does bring one to our attention it is usually a very worthy competitor. Today is no different. This new 1 kilowatt computer power supply brandishes sought after modular connections along with a very efficient design that has very much impressed us."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

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Source: [H]ard|OCP

A SFF case from Lian-Li you can pick up in stores now

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 11, 2012 - 04:39 PM |
Tagged: SFF, PC-TU200, Lian-Li

One frustrating thing about seeing all of the great new products at CES is that you can't always get your hands on them as many products are unreleased as the companies are showing off prototypes.  Take a break from the unobtainable with Think Computers who just wrapped up a review of the Lian-Li PC-TU200.  It is a squarish mini-tower, measuring 220mm x 320mm x 360mm (8.7" x 12.6" x 14.1") and will house Mini-ITX and Mini-DTX style motherboards.  Thanks to some decent spacing, you can fit many varieties of discrete GPUs and there is room for four 3.5" drives and a pair of 2.5" drives for those who want to include an SSD.  The exterior features a carrying handle, two USB 3.0 ports and eSATA connections, making it great for LAN parties and other purposes.  Check out the full review here.

TC_Lian-Li PC-TU200.jpg

"I have to say I am a huge fan of small form factor (SFF) cases. Not only because they are small but I am amazed at all of the features they can pack into such a small case. Today’s case is no exception. It fits Mini-ITX and Mini-DTX motherboards, has internal USB 3.0 and eSATA compatibility, a large 140mm intake fan, room for both 3.5-inch and 2.5-inch hard drives, a really cool side panel release system and even a handle on top for easy transportation. The case I’m talking about is the PC-TU200 from Lian Li. Read on as we have the review."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

A CPU Cooling Heatsink With Built In Computer From AMD

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 10, 2012 - 08:43 PM |
Tagged: nano-itx, heatsink, e-350, cooling, cooler master, CES, APU

At CES today we saw what at first resembles a Cooler Master V6 CPU heastink and fan combo. The processor cooler features a red 120mm fan housed in a black shroud which is then attached to the heatsink itself. The heatsink is a tower design with six copper heatpipes attached to a copper CPU block. The heatpipes then lead into a tower of aluminum fins to dissipate heat.

IMG_7519.JPG

On the back of the unit; however, there's a little something extra in the form of a nano-itx motherboard and AMD E-350 APU based on the Brazos platform. The computer is self contained and provides a number of connectivity options. For more information on the Brazos platform and E-350 APU, see our preview and review articles. A quick run down of the E-350 specifications; however, is below.

  • Two Bobcat CPU cores at 1.6 GHz
  • A Radeon HD 6310 GPU with 80 processing cores running at 500 MHz
  • A TDP of 18 watts
  • DirectX 11 Graphics and DDR3 Memory Support

IMG_7520.JPG

The bottom of the rear of the CPU cooler is the location of the nano-ITX motherboard's rear IO panel. The motherboard features Wi-Fi, HDMI, two USB 3.0 ports, two USB 2.0 ports, Gigabit Ethernet, VGA(?), and e-SATA(?) connections.

IMG_7522.JPG

A side view of the Cooler Master heatsink is available below.

IMG_7521.JPG

It's certainly a new idea, and it will definitely hit home for people that don't need or want to run their power hungry main desktop all the time. Because the system is self contained it does present some usability issues. Mainly that you will need to have a KVM or VNC connection to control it and the inside of the computer case is going to become a lot more crowded with cables. Further, it would be a pain to have to open up the main desktop system just to plug in a flash drive or cable. On the other hand, it'd make for a nice media or file server and would not require the desktop be on 24/7 without needing yet another box crowding my desk so I'd give it a shot. (The inside of my computer case is already a mess of wires so what do I have to lose?)

What are your thoughts on this somewhat strange CPU cooler?

PC Perspective's CES 2012 coverage is sponsored by MSI Computer.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Video Perspective: Corsair Obsidian 550D case with unique features and $149 price

Subject: Cases and Cooling, Shows and Expos | January 10, 2012 - 08:26 PM |
Tagged: video, obsidian, corsair, CES, 550d

Corsair had a handful of new items on display at CES 2012, the most interesting of which to me was the new Obsidian 550D case that will be available in the next 3-4 weeks with a $149 price tag.  It offers the same cable routing system we are used to seeing on Corsair designs but adds an interesting twist with a dual-hinged front panel door and magnetic air intake filters.

PC Perspective's CES 2012 coverage is sponsored by MSI Computer.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

AMD Shows Off Trinity APU Die And Trinity Powered Notebook

Subject: Cases and Cooling, Processors | January 10, 2012 - 08:13 PM |
Tagged: VLIW-4, trinity, piledriver, CES, APU, amd

Today at CES, the Consumer Electronics Show, we got to see a demonstration by AMD of an AMD powered computer running dual monitors. Only, it was not just a dual monitor pushing desktop computer. In a surprise twist, AMD took the side panel off of the desktop computer to reveal that it was actually a laptop computer using their next generation AMD Trinity APU that was driving the game on one display, and the windows desktop on the other display. Even more, on the laptop screen itself, it was playing a 720p video.

IMG_7516.JPG

Here you can see the two displays that the Trinity powered laptop was driving with Dirt 3 on the left monitor and the Windows desktop on the right one where a video conversion was happening in the background. AMD did not get into any details regarding the transcode, however.

IMG_7515.JPG

This is the "desktop" computer case that they opened up to reveal that it was, in fact, a Trinity laptop that was driving all the displays.

IMG_7517.JPG

A die shot of the upcoming Trinity APU (Accelerated Processing Unit) sitting next to a USB flash drive. Specifications of the Trinity APUs have not yet been released by AMD; however, if this leak holds true the Trinity APUs will have either two or four Piledriver CPU cores and TDP (thermal design power) of 65 W, 100 W, and 125 Watts (depending on particular chip). Clock speeds will further vary between 2.2 and 3.8 GHz at stock speeds (will run a bit faster with Turbo Core 3.0). The GPU aspect will be clocked between 563 MHz and 711 MHz and is based on the VLIW4 technology of the Cayman graphics Cards (69xx). They estimate that it will deliver up to 30% more performance versus current Llano chips and will support all the fancy new X86 instruction sets like AVX and AES-NI. A nice boost and hopefully the real specifications will come close to this (or be even better, of course).

Update: Another interesting bit of information is that AMD will have a low power Trinity APU with a TDP of 17 watts and will supposedly deliver the same level of performance as the current Llano chips (that draw twice the power).

Update:  AMD has stated Trinity will deliver a 25% increase in CPU performance and a 50% increase in GPU performance versus current Llano APUs.  Stay tuned to PC Perspective for more Trinity info as it develops.

PC Perspective's CES 2012 coverage is sponsored by MSI Computer.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

CES 2012: EVGA parties like it's socket 2011 in Viva Las Vegas. Dual-socket SR-X mobo, UV Plus+ 39 video out for USB3, PSUs

Subject: General Tech, Motherboards, Cases and Cooling, Shows and Expos | January 10, 2012 - 07:22 PM |
Tagged: evga, CES 2012, CES

There are most commonly three types of booths in CES: a display of one or more new and innovative products to hope to blaze their very own trail, a display of one or more intriguing iterations on existing product lines, or a display of some sort of pasta or alcoholic beverage. This year EVGA appears to fit mostly into the middle category; I hear they make good chips, however. The three major iterations this year quite possibly could not be more diverse: a new dual-socket Xeon motherboard, new power supplies, and an update to their UV Plus+ USB video adapter.

EVGA-logo.jpg

There’s something ironic about HDMI and DVI products by EVGA.

Dual-Socket 2011 SR-X Xeon motherboard

EVGA-mobo.jpg

Not to be outdone by their old pizza box-sized components, EVGA announced their new SR-X motherboard to bring a product like the SR-2 to socket 2011. This time around they retain their 12 DIMM slots update their PCI-E slots to the third generation with 4-way SLI possible. You can also expect 8 SAS/SATA ports to connect a large number of hard drives at 6Gbps to your computer. It is clear that EVGA has aimed this PC motherboard at enthusiasts who want what they want and have the credit to get it.

1500W, 1000W, 750W power supplies

EVGA-psu.jpg

EVGA has made a few power supplies in the past so why not add a few more products to their portfolio? Partially pictured above is the 1000W unit that can provide 82A over the 12V rail -- which should be useful to pair with a Quad-SLI SR-X rig; and if not, there’s the 1500W one with a stated “customizable number of 12V rails” whatever that actually means.

UV Plus+ 39 video out by USB 3.0

EVGA-UV.jpg

The general masses regularly ask for methods to connect their computers to their HDTV through their USB ports and are routinely shocked to find that it is not a simple cable solution. Ponder that, USB cannot do everything… or can it? EVGA updated their UV Plus+ 19 with their UV Plus+ 39 to add support for dual-monitor output and USB3.0 for higher bandwidth, though USB 2.0 is still supported. There is no word on whether the maximum resolution would be reduced in dual-monitor mode. If you are worried about graphics acceleration over a USB device, the driver created links to your real video card thus you still have access to your GPU for processing.

Now we just need to find out about their video cards.

PC Perspective's CES 2012 coverage is sponsored by MSI Computer.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: PCPer

ThermalTake at CES 2012

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 9, 2012 - 04:06 PM |
Tagged: thermaltake, Power Supplies, Keyboards, headphones, CES 2012, CES, cases

Last year at CES, ThermalTake had a rather sparse room of equipment to show off.  This year, the room was much fuller in terms of new and interesting products.   ThermalTake is a company that is not afraid to jump into new categories, and in this case we are seeing two areas that are a bit foreign to most PC enthusiasts.

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ThermalTake was one of the first companies that did not have a background in power supplies to actually move into that industry.  The first series of power supplies were actually quite impressive for the time, and they helped to set a new standard that would eventually be followed by the likes of Coolermaster and Corsair.  This year they are introducing some improvements in their design and component choices that should allow them to approach the quality and features of industry leaders like Silverstone and Corsair.  ThermalTake has the Platinum series which promises up to 93% efficiency and the platinum rating.  They are also offering slightly lower gold rated supplies that are now available in white.  ThermalTake is a rather fluid company when it comes to products though, and it will be interesting to see what actually gets delivered to market vs. what all was shown.  We will see the Platinum series and the white products, but some details may change as well as differences in cable choices.  They did show off the massive 1475 watt unit which is also able to power your arc welder...

Read more about this visit here.

PC Perspective's CES 2012 coverage is sponsored by MSI Computer.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: ThermalTake

MSI Launches Military Inspired Interceptor Computer Case Series

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 7, 2012 - 07:08 PM |
Tagged: msi, cases, atx, interceptor, raptor, CES

It seems to be "Diversification Season" here in the tech world, as Vizio adds computers to their portfolio and now MSI, a company most well known for motherboards and graphics cards, is launching a series of computer cases. The new MSI cases have a military inspired theme and have been dubbed the Interceptor Series. Currently, there are two mid tower ATX form factor cases in the lineup including the Raptor and Nighthawk.

Both the Nighthawk and Raptor cases are constructed of black steel , have included ball-bearing fans, and plenty of ventilation, tool-less drive bays and expansion slots, and a three year manufacturer's warranty. Also, both cases have seven expansion slots and can accommodate graphics cards up to 12.2" in length.

The Raptor is the least flashy of the two, though it still manages to look nice. The side panel has a large mesh ventilation area over the CPU and VRM area. Meanwhile, the front of the case features a blue LED fan behind a mesh grill with MSI logo, and supports three 5.25" drive bays. Further, the case comes with a 12-in-1 card reader accessible on the front panel as well as two USB ports, 1 USB 3.0 port and two audio ports (mic and headphone). Last up, the case is ready for water cooling radiators and has a bottom mounted PSU rack.

Raptor_Case.png

The Raptor

If the Raptor is the little brother, the Nighthawk is the big guns and the case is definitely more flashy in its military theme inspiration. The side panel has a larger mesh grill that breaks out of the case and has what may resemble bullet holes throughout. The front panel is more stylized as well with a large mesh grill minus logos to facilitate the most airflow with a blue LED fan behind it. The front panel support three USB 2.0 ports, 1 USB 3.0 port, and two audio jacks for microphone and headphones. This case also has the 12-in-1 card reader and the front of the case can hold up to four 5.25" drives. The case is a bit taller than the raptor and has larger feet so it sits higher off of the ground. MSI claims the case is ready to roll with liquid cooling solutions as well.

Interceptor_Case.png

The Nighthawk

MSI says that the cases will be available for purchase by the end of December in North America. The Nighthawk has an MSRP of $79.99 while the Raptor has an MSRP of $59.99. Not a bad start, MSI. The cases may yet be something that Ryan and the crew will be able to see first-hand at CES.

PC Perspective's CES 2012 coverage is sponsored by MSI Computer.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: MSI

Cooler Master's fully controllable Silent Pro Hybrid 850W PSU

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 4, 2012 - 02:18 PM |
Tagged: Silent Pro Hybrid 850W, PSU, modular psu, cooler master, 80 gold

Cooler Master's new Silent Pro Hybrid 850W PSU differs somewhat from your average PSU.  Like many it is fully modular and uses a single 12V rail which is becoming common for high wattage PSUs.  The 80+ Gold rating is a little rarer but what really makes it stand out is a faceplate that acts as a fan controller.  The controller allows a variety of speeds to be set for the PSU fan as well as three system fans and can even switch the PSU into fanless mode to make this PSU truly silent.  Guru3D put the PSU through its paces and were truly impressed by this ~$200 PSU, see why in the full review.

If you are looking for a little less power, Lee just wrapped up his review of the Corsair TX550M and TX750M PSUs.

G3D_CMsilentpro.jpg

"Cooler Master launched the new Cooler Master Silent Pro Hybrid PSU series. The end result as such is enticing alright, a very nice power supply rates 80+ gold, that comes with a modular design and one big massive 12V rail, which we all like so very much. Carrying a 80+ Gold certification (90% efficiency at typical load) , being modular, with included fan controller and having good looks yeah the Silent Pro Hybrid promises to be an excellent product series."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Source: Guru3D

Cooler Master invents a new form factor to handle their monstrous new Cosmos II Ultra enclosure

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 3, 2012 - 02:25 PM |
Tagged: cooler master, Cosmos II Ultra

Cooler Master has released the second version of their COSMOS case, which has grown so much larger in all dimensions that Cooler Master has decided to call it an Ultra tower.  The size has also increased the air capabilities of the case with larger and more numerous fans as well as providing space and tools for a bottom mounted reservoir.  They also focused on cable management features which makes sense when there are 13 drive bays in total.  The size of this case will accept XL-ATX motherboards, multiple GPUs of up to 15.1" and even extra long PSUs.  The only thing that Legit Reviews felt was lacking with the case were casters to move the 50lb monster.

For more visually focused individuals you can catch a video of Ryan reviewing the Corsair Carbide 500R and 400R cases.

LR_CosmosIIUltra_45.jpg

"At first glance the COSMOS II looks very similar to the original case as it has the top and bottom rails still, but beyond that it is very different. For one thing it is bigger in all dimensions with the original Cosmos at 10.47"(W) x 23.54"(H) x 24.72" (D) but the new and improved Cosmos II Ultra Tower stands a whopping 13.5"(W) x 27.7"(H) x 26.1"(D). This is larger than most cases classified as a Full Tower which is why Cooler Master came up with the Ultra Tower category..."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Fractal Design thinks small with their Define Mini MicroATX Tower

Subject: Cases and Cooling | December 15, 2011 - 01:00 PM |
Tagged: fractal design, Define Mini, MicroATX, SFF

SPCR has reviewed a case for those designing mATX cases, a shrunken version of the Fractal Design Define R3, the Define Mini.  The case is 210mm x 395mm x 490mm (8.3" x 15.5" x19.3") and places the PSU at the bottom which in this case made add stability to the design.  Careful attention was paid to the acoustical qualities of the case, with the stock fans cooling the system it produced 16dBa which should easily be drowned out by background noise.  Even in such a small case there is still room for six easy-to-access hard drives, six large fans, large CPU heatsinks, long graphics cards and the cable management holes will help make your build tidy.  No wonder this case received a recommendation from Silent PC Review.

SPCR_define_mini.jpg

"The Fractal Design Define Mini is a smaller version of the popular Define R3. It might just be the answer to those looking for a solid microATX tower with all the trappings and conveniences of a modern ATX case."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Another unfortunately named PSU from SilverStone; the fanless 500W ST50NF

Subject: Cases and Cooling | December 12, 2011 - 05:19 PM |
Tagged: Silverstone, Nightjar ST50NF, Fanless Power Supply

SilverStone have updated their NightJar series with a new model, the ST50NF, which is a 500W PSU that relies on passive cooling and so operates in complete silence.  With a claimed 80 Plus Silver rating this PSU is perfect for mid-range systems and servers, which you either need to operate silently or to use in dirty environments where fans can bring in enough dirt to cause shorts.  The design challenges that SilverStone faced when developing this PSU is obvious in its $200 price tag, which may discourage some.  [H]ard|OCP takes a good look at the newest NightJar from SilverStone here.

17-256-075-TS.jpg

"SilverStone is back on our test bench today with a fully silent and fanless 500 watt computer power supply that is making some very impressive "Silver" efficiency claims. Beyond that, terms like "noiseless," "dusty environments," and "mission-critical" are thrown around. Now to figure out what a "Nightjar" is."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Do you agree these are the top 3 cases of 2011

Subject: Cases and Cooling | December 9, 2011 - 12:18 PM |
Tagged: roundup, corsair, thermaltake, cubitek

2011 has been a busy year for enclosures with an enormous amount of models hitting the stores, ranging from the bare bones $50 case to impressively engineered high end cases costing over $200.  Some new players have expanded their lines and the older players have been putting those years of design experience to good work.  Think Computers has winnowed the long list of cases they've reviewed this year down to the top three models of 2011.  As you have probably guessed, the Thermaltake Level 10 GT is indeed on the list but you will have to follow the link to find out the other two cases.

TC_GT10.jpg

"It is December now and that means the end of the year is upon us. This past year we have reviewed quite a few products, but I think we have reviewed cases the most. Cases are such an important part of your system, it is the first thing someone looks at when you are at a LAN party. We have decided to make a list of the best cases of 2011. Keep in mind these are drawn from cases that we have reviewed so if you do not see a case in this list that is why. Read on to see what our favorite cases from 2011 were."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Antec Will Support USB 2.0 Motherboards In Eleven Hundred and P280 Cases

Subject: Cases and Cooling | December 7, 2011 - 09:38 AM |
Tagged: p280, gaming, eleven hundred, cases, antec

While it is not often that users upgrade their computer cases without also updating the internals (at least compared to the opposite scenario), Antec still has you covered. If you purchase an Antec P280 or Eleven Hundred gaming case to house your trusty computer components that are only up to USB 2.0 compatible the two USB 3.0 ports are useless as the internal connector will not be compatible. Fret not; however, as the company has listened to user feedback and will now ship users a free adapter so that the front panel USB ports will be compatible with your motherboard (though only up to USB 2.0 speeds, of course).

Antec has been quoted by Maximum PC in stating that “We have hear the feedback you and your readers have given us regarding the USB 3.0 internal connector.”  The further detailed that the specific compatibility issue is with the internal header connection, which would not work with older motherboards.  As of today, users in such a predicament can visit the Antec website’s support page here or call 1-(800)-22ANTEC in the United States to request an adapter. The adapter is free; however, an invoice or other proof of purchase showing you bought one of the affected cases will be required.

Antec P280 USB.jpg

The Antec P280's front panel USB 3.0 ports

I have to say that this is quite good on Antec’s part and it shows that they are really listening to customer feedback. For more on the company, why not check out the latest Inside Perspective interview with Antec?

Source: Maximum PC

Phanteks' first enthusiast heatsink has been well received

Subject: Cases and Cooling | December 5, 2011 - 01:28 PM |
Tagged: phanteks, PH-TC14PE

According to their website Phanteks have been in the cooling business for 20 years, though obviously not the enthusiast market as the PH-TC14PE seems to be the first cooler to undergo a trip through the review circuit.  It is one to keep an eye on as the reviews have been quite positive.  It is a dual tower design which allows the use of two 140mm fans, which are included with the heatsink.  It weighs in at 1250g when the two fans are attached and stands 159mm x 140mm x 171mm so you will not be sticking this into an mATX case but it is shorter than some competitors models.  OCC was blown away by the effective performance of this air cooler and were also impressed at the four available colours of heatsink and matching fans.

OCC_Phanteks.jpg

"When the results from the first test I ran (Overclocked Load) started to take shape, I could only describe the look on my face as "WOW". In disbelief of these numbers demolishing the NH-D14, I grabbed my infrared thermometer and checked the floor next to the computer (to verify ambient temperature) — it was right where it was supposed to be. I looked back at the RealTemp display and stared at the temperatures for the next few minutes (after already running for 45 minutes), and they didn't budge. This cooler has thrown up some astounding results and has blown me away."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING