Intel may delay shipments of Ivy Bridge processors

Subject: Processors | February 16, 2012 - 12:47 PM |
Tagged: Intel, Ivy Bridge, delay

Some unfortunate news is making the rounds today surrounding a potential delay of the upcoming Intel Ivy Bridge processor.  A story over at Digitimes is reporting that due to an abundance of inventory on current generation Sandy Bridge parts, Intel will start to trickle out Ivy Bridge in early April but will hold off on the full shipments until after June.

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If Intel is indeed delaying shipping Ivy Bridge it likely isn't due to pressure from AMD and with the announcement by top brass there it seems likely Intel will retain the performance lead on the CPU side of things from here on out.  With the release of Windows 8 coming in the fall of 2012 Intel's partners (and Intel internally) are likely going to be using that as the primary jumping off point for the architecture transition. 

If ever there was a reason to support AMD and competition in general, this is exactly that.  Without pressure from a strong offering from the opposition Intel is free to adjust their product schedule based on internal financial reasons rather than external consumer forces.  While we will still see some Ivy Bridge availability in April (according to Digitimes at least) in order to avoid a marketing disaster, it seems that the wide scale availability of the Intel design with processor graphics performance expected to be double that of Sandy Bridge won't be until the summer.

 

Source: Digitimes
February 16, 2012 | 01:09 PM - Posted by dagamer34 (not verified)

Apple will get their chips, and first tier OEMs will likely release some enthusiast models, but Intel and everyone is hedging their bets on Windows 8.

February 16, 2012 | 01:31 PM - Posted by Wolvenmoon (not verified)

Considering building a 6-core AMD rig now to run VMs and a Minecraft and Terraria server.

I'll check the HWLB in a few days.

February 16, 2012 | 02:07 PM - Posted by Umbrel (not verified)

If the reason is excess of SandyBridge, then it is not an Intel decision, it is a decision of the PC vendors. If Intel will be ready an selling IvyBridge in April then they will sell whatever CPU they are asked for.
This sounds more like Intel is not getting much orders for IvyBridge until the second half of the year.

February 16, 2012 | 08:27 PM - Posted by pdjblum

I for one have put off the purchase of sandy bridge in favor of ivy bridge. Having waited for quite a while already, this news sucks, to put it bluntly.

February 17, 2012 | 05:02 AM - Posted by Hethenon (not verified)

As someone who well remembers "the bad old days" (remembered by most as the "good old days"- both names are true) Ryan is _dead right_ about the impact of AMD as competition. I am not an AMD nor Intel fanboy (I use whichever part does the job the best for the budget at hand), but if you have been around as long as I have been, then you know that AMD's market position helped keep Intel honest over the last decade or so.

While I do not think this is the _only_ reason, but without sufficient pressure from AMD as an alternative, prices from Intel will trend up, as will costs to the end user (price and costs are not the same thing).

To be fair, I have been seeing a slowing of certain upgrade trends over the last 4-5 years. So AMD's market position and Intel's internal thinking are not the only reasons.

February 17, 2012 | 05:05 AM - Posted by Hethenon (not verified)

@ pdjblum

For what it's worth, I have an aging system that I have been hoping to replace with a new custom built Linux workstation. I thought it was possible that Bulldozer might do the trick, but decided to wait for Ivy Bridge.

Now....... I have to wonder.

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