Intel Ivy Bridge Processors To Launch March 23 2012

Subject: Processors | March 19, 2012 - 03:33 PM |
Tagged: Ivy Bridge, Intel, cpu, 22nm

Jeremy posted earlier that Guru3D managed to spot a list of Ivy Bridge processors on Intel's site before getting taken down; however, they did not indicate any specific release dates. A recent article over at TechARP today did mention two dates that are allegedly going to be the launch date and release date for Intel's latest Ivy Bridge 22nm processors.

According to the article, Intel will launch their Ivy Bridge CPUs on Friday March 23, 2012, and then the actual release date (when hardware will be available) will be April 29, 2012.

Among the new processors are Intel's standard TDP parts at 77 Watts and low voltage parts with 65 Watt TDPs. Of the standard voltage parts, the "K" series Ivy Bridge CPUs will feature Intel's newest HD 4000 processor graphics and unlocked multipliers. All the nitty-gritty details including clock speeds and core counts are shown in the chart below. The HD 2500 GPU will is the chip that the remaining processors use.

Model Cores / Threads Clock Speed / Turbo Boost (GHz) L3 Cache Processor Graphics TDP Launch Price ($USD)
 i7-3770K  4 / 8  3.5 / 3.9   8 MB  HD 4000  77 W  $332
 i7-3770  4 / 8  3.4 / 3.9  8 MB  HD 4000  77  W  $294
 i5-3570K  4 / 4  3.4 / 3.8  6 MB  HD 4000  77 W  $225
 i5-3570  4 / 4  3.4 / 3.8  6 MB  HD 2500  77 W  $215
 i5-3550  4 / 4  3.3 / 3.7  6 MB  HD 2500  77 W  $205
 i5-3470  4 / 4  3.2 / 3.6  6 MB  HD 2500  77 W  NA
 i5-3450  4 / 4  3.1 / 3.5  6 MB  HD 2500  77 W  $184
 i5-3330  4 / 4  3.0 / 3.2  6 MB  HD 2500  77 W  NA

 

Further, Intel's low voltage Ivy Bridge processors on the desktop feature clock speeds ranging from 2.7 GHz to 3.1 GHz and between 2 and four cores. Of these CPUs, only the top end Intel Core i7-3770T and i7-3770S along with the Core i5-3470T processors will include Intel's Hyper-Threading technology. Also, only the two top end low voltage parts and the Intel Core i5-3475S Ivy Bridge CPU will use Intel's new HD 4000 processor graphics. The remaining parts will use the HD 2500 GPU. The chart below lists the current desktop lineup of low voltage parts including price, core count, and clock speeds.

Model Cores / Threads Clock Speed / Turbo Boost (GHz) L3 Cache Processor Graphics TDP Launch Price ($USD)
 i7-3770S   4 / 8  3.1 / 3.9  8 MB  HD 4000  65 W  $294
 i7-3770T  4 / 8  2.5 / 3.7  8 MB  HD 4000  65 W  $294
 i5-3570S  4 / 4  3.1 / 3.8  6 MB  HD 2500  65 W  $205
 i5-3570T  4 / 4  2.3 / 3.3  6 MB  HD 2500  65 W  $205
 i5-3550S  4 / 4  3.0 / 3.7  6 MB  HD 2500  65 W  $205
 i5-3475S  4 / 4  2.9 / 3.6  6 MB  HD 4000  65 W  NA
 i5-3470S  4 / 4  2.9 / 3.6  3 MB  HD 2500  65 W  NA
 i5-3470T  2 / 4  2.9 / 3.6  3 MB  HD 2500  65 W  $184
 i5-3450S  4 / 4  2.8 / 3.5  6 MB  HD 2500  65 W  $184
 i5-3330S  4 / 4  2.7 / 3.2  6 MB  HD 2500  65 W  NA

 

More Ivy Bridge information on Ivy Bridge's 22nm tri-gate transistors  and a preview of the Intel Core i7-3770K is available here and here respectively.  Jeremy also tracked down an image of the above charts here.

Source: TechARP
March 19, 2012 | 04:40 PM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

man, loving the data charts... makes it REALLY easy to compare parts. These proc part numbers cross my eyes they have so many of them.

March 19, 2012 | 08:32 PM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

finally

March 20, 2012 | 02:45 AM - Posted by Matthew (not verified)

Shouldn't the T models have a lower TDP in many cases? I seem to recall that being the case for the sandy bridge processors and the clock speeds still appear to be lower.

March 20, 2012 | 05:18 AM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

As per the norm, wikipedia has all the answers on this, and the answer seems to be yes. (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivy_Bridge_%28microarchitecture%29 )

March 20, 2012 | 09:16 AM - Posted by Branthog

I wonder how much you could shave off the price without the graphics processor? I suspect that a very large number of us have no intention of ever using it.

Anyway, I'll be interested in seeing how the i7-3770K holds up for a gaming system.

March 20, 2012 | 10:10 AM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

Most consumers will use the IGP.

March 20, 2012 | 04:30 PM - Posted by Branthog

Mobile aside, you surely don't believe most consumers are going to forgo a dedicated discrete GPU for one on-die? And certainly not gamers or graphic artists of any kind?

March 21, 2012 | 08:20 AM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

Notebooks, laptops and that market will most likely use the onboard graphics. As gamers and graphic designers dont make up a huge part of the market making the k versions without graphics would be even more expensive than just unlocking them.

March 20, 2012 | 11:54 AM - Posted by shakypete (not verified)

Are the thermals for 3770s and 3770T correct? Usually those skus have lower thermal limits. And they are not likely to be the same at 65Watts

March 20, 2012 | 12:47 PM - Posted by Tim (not verified)

:( OCT and HEX CORE!!!!!!!

March 20, 2012 | 03:43 PM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

hey guys sorry im new to learning about all the computer components and i didnt understand what the processor graphics means? like for the I7-3770K what does hd 4000 mean? i know thats a graphics card but why are they listing it here? little input for a newbie like me would be great. thank you!

March 20, 2012 | 03:57 PM - Posted by Jeremy Hellstrom

Both Intel and AMD's current generation of chips (barring a select few) are now a CPU and a GPU. Read up on the Llano and SandyBridge reviews to catch up on APUs/GPUs/random other buzzwords invented to describe them as something other than a CPU.

March 20, 2012 | 03:55 PM - Posted by Hamlet (not verified)

Gotta love how Intel downgraded the graphics ...

March 20, 2012 | 04:05 PM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

oh i didn't know that. so that's what we call a integrated graphics card? Im building a new rig when ivy B is released for Diablo 3, im still going to want to get a good graphics card right?

March 21, 2012 | 08:21 AM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

The onboard graphics will do fine for everyday usage but games such as Diablo will need more performance so yes you need a discrete videocard.

March 21, 2012 | 10:37 AM - Posted by Jeremy Hellstrom

You could call it an integrated graphics processor but that might confuse some people who consider an IGP to be located on the motherboard as opposed to the same die as the CPU. If you are going Ivy Bridge, I would recommend adding a graphics card to the build. You can always check the Hardware Leaderboard for tips.

March 20, 2012 | 06:26 PM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

I too am a bit currious about which CPU to get when I build my next rig. I am already running dual GTX560-Ti and intend to put them into the new rig. Do I even NEED a GPU?

March 21, 2012 | 01:16 PM - Posted by Matt (not verified)

Your GTX560-Ti will WAY outperform the on-die GPU, so I would definitely keep it.

March 20, 2012 | 06:32 PM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

I was hoping to see better clock speeds. I wonder if these are 1155's as they are mostly all quad-core's. Prices seem good to pick one up at launch, but we should always wait it out on the first run of most items. Either way I plan on having an energy efficient beowulf cluster with these bad boy's!!

March 21, 2012 | 08:22 AM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

Yes all 1155 as far as i can see.

March 26, 2012 | 06:58 AM - Posted by Steen (not verified)

From what I read the Ivy bridge has been delayed until the 29th of April because they have too many Sandy-bridges in spare.

April 14, 2012 | 05:54 AM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

What kind of price drops can we expect in the Sandy Bridge line-up when these hit?

Been waiting to get a E3-1230 on the cheap.

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