Getting hot and bothered by Ivy Bridge

Subject: Processors | May 2, 2012 - 04:14 PM |
Tagged: Ivy Bridge, Intel, i7-3770k

Anyone who has been keeping up with the reviews coming out which try overclocking Intel's new Ivy Bridge processor will be familiar with the large amount of power required to hit high frequencies.  While the voltages required to overclock Ivy Bridge and its predecessor Sandy Bridge are very similar, Ivy Bridge's stock voltage is lower so the change is greater for Ivy Bridge.  That larger increase could be one cause of the higher heat that Ivy Bridge generates.  Another theory is that the heatspreader could be a cause as Intel used thermal paste in the design as opposed to the fluxless solder present on SandyB, however other tests have shown that this does not seem to be the case.  The Tech Report has gathered together the current facts on this hot topic, so you can check out the numbers for yourself right here.

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"Folks across the web have reported some eye-poppingly high temperatures for their overclocked Ivy Bridge processors, leading to some tough questions about the causes. Does Ivy Bridge truly run hotter than its predecessor, Sandy Bridge, and if so, why? We checked into it, and the answers were surprising, to say the least. Have a look."

Here are some more Processor articles from around the web:

Processors

 

May 3, 2012 | 06:40 AM - Posted by ban ki nno (not verified)

jani ti o-ta ekta chudir vai processor.

May 3, 2012 | 09:57 AM - Posted by Swoosh (not verified)

Those Damn Tri-Gate transistors that's why! Obviously, Intel overlooked it a bit and they decided that even if it yields a much higher temperature when incorporated with Ivy bridge it would still provide increased processing performance at the same time consuming less power, as far as heavy overclocking is concerned many are bothered with this and many cant push their Ivy's like the way Sandy bridge owner's do with their 2500's and 2600's models.

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