Shave another couple of watts off your Kabini system

Subject: Memory | April 9, 2014 - 06:54 PM |
Tagged: kingston, kingston hyper x, Genesis LoVo, 16GB, ddr3-1600

If you were impressed by the low wattage required to run the AMD AM1 Athlon 5350 and are thinking of building a low power system along the lines of the one Josh used in his review Kingston has a product to help you lower that total system voltage a little more.  HyperX Genesis LoVo uses only a mere 1.35V to power the 16GB DDR3-1600 CL9 kit and their low profile helps if you are building a small sized system.  Performance at stock speeds is quite decent, with the possibility of overclocking to add more speed if you desire but these DIMMs are more about power savings than raw power.  Check out the full review at Funky Kit.

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"Even though higher clocked RAM is great for overclocking and gaming for most computer users, memory at lower clocks is good enough for the general tasks they perform daily. For those users, memory speed is usually less important than capacity so today we wish to present something more regular in the memory's world what is Kingston HyperX Genesis LoVo 16GB DDR3-1600 CL9. As probably some readers already noticed, we can't really call it regular memory as Kingston specified it to run at low voltage of 1.35V ... and it's green like most eco-friendly products."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Source: Funky Kit

SK Hynix Develops 128GB Stick of DDR4 RAM

Subject: General Tech, Memory | April 8, 2014 - 02:03 AM |
Tagged: Hynix, ddr4

... I'll take two.

SK Hynix, one of the leading producers of RAM modules, announced a single stick of DDR4 with 128GB capacity. While this is intended for the server room, I hope that we will see workstation components attempt to be compatible in the near future. It is difficult to find a board that can support more than 64GB at all, let alone twice that, per stick.

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As for the typical desktop users? Let's face it, this is overkill, eight times over, generously, per stick. Web browsers are beginning to ring up the memory usage as more and more tabs are loaded simultaneously but, otherwise, there is little use for it for them.

But for those of us who are not them, this could be awesome. It is still unclear how much memory a Haswell-EX motherboard, running on an Intel X99 chipset, will support. I can assume that this stick will not be compatible... but we can always hope, right?

Source: SK Hynix

Corsair Quantifies the Benefits of Overclocking

Subject: Editorial, General Tech, Graphics Cards, Processors, Memory, Systems | January 20, 2014 - 02:40 AM |
Tagged: corsair, overclocking

I rarely overclock anything and this is for three main reasons. The first is that I have had an unreasonably bad time with computer parts failing on their own. I did not want to tempt fate. The second was that I focused on optimizing the operating system and its running services. This was mostly important during the Windows 98, Windows XP, and Windows Vista eras. The third is that I did not find overclocking valuable enough for the performance you regained.

A game that is too hefty to run is probably not an overclock away from working.

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Thankfully this never took off...

Today, overclocking is easier and safer than ever with parts that basically do it automatically and back off, on their own, if thermals are too aggressive. Several components are also much less locked down than they have been. (Has anyone, to this day, hacked the locked Barton cores?) It should not be too hard to find a SKU which encourages the enthusiast to tweak some knobs.

But how much of an increase will you see? Corsair has been blogging about using their components (along with an Intel processor, Gigabyte motherboard, and eVGA graphics card because they obviously do not make those) to overclock. The cool part is they break down performance gains in terms of raising the frequencies for just the CPU, just the GPU, just the RAM, or all of the above together. This breakdown shows how each of the three categories contribute to the whole. While none of the overclocks are dramatic, Corsair is probably proud of the 5% jump in Cinebench OpenGL performance just by overclocking the RAM from 1600 MHz to 1866 MHz without touching the CPU or GPU.

It is definitely worth a look.

Source: Corsair

CES 2014: Micron makes further advances in DDR4 memory

Subject: Storage, Shows and Expos | January 8, 2014 - 12:57 AM |
Tagged: ram, micron, memory, ddr4, CES 2014, CES

While the Crucial did not have much in the way of new flash memory product launches this year, Micron as a whole has been busily churning out further revisions of DDR4 memory. While our visit last year only revealed a single prototype for us to look at, now we have all of the typical form factors covered:

2014-01-07 13-36-20.JPG

From top down we have enterprise, enthusiast, OEM, and SO-DIMM form factors, all populated with DDR4 parts. All that needs to happen now is for motherboard and portable manufacturers to get on board with the new technology. As with all chicken-and-egg launches, someone needs to take the first plunge, and here we can see Micron has certainly been on the leading edge of things. That enterprise part above is a full 16GB (not bits!) of DDR4 capacity.

Coverage of CES 2014 is brought to you by AMD!

PC Perspective's CES 2014 coverage is sponsored by AMD.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: Micron DRAM

Roccat's trio of peripherals for the distinguished mouser

Subject: Memory | January 7, 2014 - 03:49 PM |
Tagged: roccat, gaming mat, gaming mouse, mouse caddy

Up for review at Hardware Asylum is a trio of Roccat products, the Kone Pure Optical gaming mouse, the Hiro mousepad and the Apuri mouse cord caddy.  The cord caddy is similar to other products we've seen in the past but the inclusion of powered USB 2.0 ports is an nice addition to an otherwise superfluous peripheral.  The mousepad is made of stain resistant silicone and measures 350 x 250 x 2.5mm which should fit on most desks.  The Kone mouse sports a 4000 DPI Pro-Optic sensor, 576kB on-board memory for macros as well as the ability for you to utilize your keyboard in conjunction with the mouse thanks to the rather comprehensive software suite.

mouse_bundle_combined.jpg

"All paired together, the Kone Pure Optical, Apuri and Hiro make a nice setup that provides a lot of utility and versatility inside and out of games, and all without breaking the bank. This trio can be acquired for the cost of just a high grade laser mouse alone, and it will perform and feel great in many gaming and working environments."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

AnandTech Benchmarks Memory for Servers

Subject: General Tech, Memory | January 1, 2014 - 03:37 AM |
Tagged: RDIMM, ram, LRDIMM

In all honesty, outside of on-die graphics solutions, memory speed and latency are often neglected. My only requirements for RAM beyond the recommended specs for my motherboard and processor has been a heat spreader of some sort (and that is just because I have bad luck with several DOAs on unshielded RAM which I assume was handling problems).

But this story is for the enterprise users.

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Johan De Gelas of AnandTech decided to test a few different configurations of RAM including both RDIMM and LRDIMM modules. LRDIMMs are significantly more expensive than the cheaper RIMM modules but, especially if you could reduce server count (and active licenses of software running on them) they wanted to investigate whether it could be cheaper overall. This would not be the case if software is completely CPU-limited... but, again, when is memory the limiting factor?

That is where the benchmarks come in. Among the handful of measurements performed, they simulated thousands of users accessing a CDN with between one-to-three-quarters of a terabyte of memory. In both cases, 768GB of LRDIMM memory had significantly higher throughput and significantly lower latency.

As always, check out the review if you are interested.

Source: Anandtech

Revisiting ultra fast DDR3; is it worth the price yet?

Subject: Memory | November 18, 2013 - 06:33 PM |
Tagged: DDR3-2400, patriot, Viper 3, Black Mamba, 16GB

Patriot's Viper 3 Black Mamba PC3-19200 16GB kit will set you back $225 to purchase which is a large premium over DDR3-1600.  Base timings of 11-11-11-28 are not that much higher than DDR3 which might help these DIMMs live up to their premium pricing as will Intel's XMP 1.3 memory profile.  To find out how it compares to other 2400MHz RAM as well as slower kits you can head over to Neoseeker to read their full review as well as see what kind of overclock they managed to attain.

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"Today we review Patriot's Viper 3 series Black Mamba PC3-19200 16B dual channel memory kit featuring low-profile heatspreaders and an Intel XMP profile."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Source: Neoseeker

Antec's High Current Pro 850W Platinum is worth its weight in ...

Subject: Memory | October 16, 2013 - 04:55 PM |
Tagged: antec, HCP-850 Platinum, modular psu, 80 Plus Platinum, Antec High Current Pro

If high efficiency is your preference then the Antec High Current Pro series is probably familiar to you.  Legit Reviews just reviewed their most powerful model, providing up to  850W and sporting four 40A 12V rails to power the six PCIe power connectors.  The fully modular design is great for keeping your case clean and the clear labellings on the PSU ensures you can properly balance the load between the 12V rails.  It performed admirably but the retail price of ~$200 did disappoint Legit Reviews somewhat.

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"Today we will be having a close look at the 850W version of the High Current Pro series, the HCP-850. The HCP-850 is a modular power supply with a very long list of features and a seven year long warranty. As all of the High Current Pro products, the HCP-850 also comes with an 80Plus Platinum certification, the highest currently available on a retail product..."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Just how special is Kingston's 10th Anniversary HyperX Kit

Subject: Memory | October 3, 2013 - 05:31 PM |
Tagged: kingston hyper x, kingston, HyperX Genesis 10th Anniversary Special Edition, DDR3-2400, 16GB

Kingston 10th Anniversary HyperX 16GB 2400MHz brings you a DOTA 2 tourney but does it also bring performance to your PC?  This 4x4 kit runs DDR3-2133 @ 11-13-13-30 or DDR3-2400 @ 11-14-14-30 which implies very good performance from these DIMMs at stock speeds.  Of course Overclockers Club were not satisfied with stock speeds and with a little tweaking managed to hit DDR3-2522 @ 12-13-13-33 which was enough to give them a boost in performance without causing instability.  Another feature of these DIMMs many will like is the low profile of the heatspreaders which will allow a much broader choice of CPU heatsink.

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”During my testing I found that while the kit ran flawlessly at its rated speed of 2400MHz, they just did not offer a whole lot of headroom above that, even when pushing 1.75v+ through them. Seeing how running a 125MHz or 166MHz strap is a bit easier on the memory controller, I swapped to the 125MHz divider and started upping the frequency up a little at a time until reaching the maximum clock speed on the HyperX modules. I left the memory sub timings alone and controlled by the board, adjusted the primary timings to 12-13-13-33, adjusted the DRAM voltage to 1.70v, started up again, and finally reached 1260.2MHz or just over 2520MHz for a 120MHz gain in clock speed. That represents about a 5% gain from just testing and tweaking. What I found was that the Kingston HyperX 10th Anniversary modules performed well even with the boosted clock speed. The low profile heat sink makes sure there are no restrictions to the CPU cooling solution used.”

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

SK Hynix Will Resume DRAM Production At Chinese Plant Soon

Subject: Memory | September 7, 2013 - 01:43 AM |
Tagged: manufacturing plant, Hynix, DRAM

SK Hynix experienced a fire at one of its DRAM manufacturing plants in Wuxi, China on September 4th. Initial reports suggested that the plant would need major repairs as the large black smoke cloud above the facility appeared rather ominous. Because the plant is responsible for approximately 40% of Hynix's DRAM output (which amounts to 12% of global DRAM supply), the plant shutting down for repairs would have severely disrupted the memory market and pricing of both individual chips and memory modules.

Fortunately, the fire was much less severe than it appeared. SK Hynix recently released a statement indicating that the fire was concentrated in the air purification hardware connected to the rooftop which resulted in the large smoke plumes. There was “no material damage” to the machinery used on the manufacturing floor in the production of DRAM chips. The damage was relatively minor and the facility will resume production shortly following minor repairs.

SK Hynix Logo.png

SK Hynix manufactures DRAM and flash memory chips.

A SK Hynix spokesperson Seongae Park was quoted by Bit-Tech in stating that “we expect to resume operations in a short time period.” Also, Hynix indicated that its overall supply volume and DRAM production would not see a major drop.

This is good news for PC OEMs and enthusiasts as it means prices for the chips and resulting hardware should not spike and will stabilize sooner than originally expected.

Source: Bit-Tech

Why yes, you can buy DDR3-3100 now ... can you afford it though?

Subject: Memory | September 6, 2013 - 06:07 PM |
Tagged: PC3-24800, DDR3-3100, AVEXIR

A company called AVEXIR have released a 2x4GB RAM kit of DDR3-3100 (PC3-24800)
@ 12-15-15-35.  You can pick them up for a mere $2000, a discount of $8000 from the usual price!  They don't do too badly in the benchmarks at TechPowerUp and did allow some overclocking above even that insane frequency.  There are not too many motherboards which support this speed and these DIMMs get hot so make sure you have thought long and hard before purchasing this kit.

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"I've got AVEXIR's latest high-performance Core Series 3100 MHz C12 DIMMs in for testing, and they definitely show what Avexir is capable of. Not for everyone, this blazingly fast kit will probably also make your wallet crumble to dust."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

 

Source: TechPowerUp

Is AMD's Radeon Memory Gamer Series worth the premium?

Subject: Memory | August 16, 2013 - 06:37 PM |
Tagged: radeon memory, ddr3-2133, amd

Neoseeker is testing AMD's Gamer Series memory which runs at 2133MHz with timings of 10-11-11-30 at stock.  They tested the memory against six other kits at stock speeds and overclocked to 2600MHz @ 12-13-13-33 and were pleasantly surprised to see it sitting at the top of the test results in most cases.  They chose to test on an Intel platform and saw absolutely no compatibility issues though it would be interesting to see these DIMMs tested on an AMD rig as well.

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"The Radeon RG2133 Gamer Series memory kit contains four 4GB DDR3-2133 (PC3-17000) memory modules and is rated to work at 1.65V with 10-11-11-30 latency. AMD's Radeon Memory Gamer Series features supports for AMP and XMP Profiles 1, 2, and a low profile design for a better clearance for large CPU cooler clearance while still offering enhanced heat dissipation. Find out how this $154.99 USD quad-channel kit fares in our review!"

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Source: Neoseeker

Overclockers Push G.Skill RAM To 3,163 MHz At Swiss Gaming Night

Subject: Memory | June 28, 2013 - 01:09 PM |
Tagged: gskill, ddr3, overclocking, LN2, swiss gaming night

G.Skill recently announced that its DDR3 memory modules were used to break three memory frequency records at an overclocking event in Zurich, Switzerland. Professional over lockers Marine, TaPaKaH, and Christian Ney joined in on the fun at Swiss Gaming Night to break the CL5, CL6, and CL7 categories.

DDR3 Memory Overclock Validation GSkill.jpg

CPU-Z Validation Page.

In a system with an Intel Haswell Core i7-4770K and 4GB of dual channel DDR3 G.Skill RAM, the overclockers achieved some impressive results, reaching 2,951 MHz at CL5, 3,136 MHz at CL6, and 3,163 MHz at CL7.

  Clockspeed CAS Latency
4GB DDR3 2,951 MHz 5-11-7-28
4GB DDR3 3,136 MHz 6-11-7-28
4GB DDR3 3,163 MHz 1-12-8-30

These are some impressive overclocks, which were aided by copious amounts of LN2. More information can be found in this press release.

Source: G.Skill

High speed DIMMs for Haswell, Corsair's Vengeance Pro series

Subject: Memory | June 27, 2013 - 07:44 PM |
Tagged: corsair, Corsair Vengeance, Corsair Vengeance Pro, DDR3-2400

Hot on the heels of Haswell comes high speed DIMMs from most manufacturers in much greater quantity than previously available.  For instance the Corsair Vengeance Pro 16GB 2400C10 Memory Kit, a pair of 8GB DIMMs with timings of 10-12-12-31 at stock and part of a family of RAM that runs from 8GB to 32GB and is available in speeds of up to 2933MHz.  MadShrimps just reviewed these DIMMs and while they didn't have much luck overclocking them they were more than satisfied with the stability at stock speeds.

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"CORSAIR just recently launched their brand new Vengeance Pro series kits. These are designed to set new levels in value and overclocking. With a new stylish and aggressive looking heat spreader design, available in four different flavors: Blue, Gold Red and Silver color. The current products range up from 8GB to a whopping 64GB kit. The rated speeds start of at 1600MHz up to 2933MHz for the flagship version; especially the high end versions are being optimized for Intel's 4th generation Haswell processors. At Computex 2013, CORSAIR already showed higher specced versions, though if these will ever hit the shelves remains a big question. The today's reviewed Vengeance Pro kit is one of the more enthusiast targeted kits, comprising out of two 8GB 2400MHz Cas 10 DIMMs, with a red accent finish."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Source: MadShrimps

Kingston Technology Ships Intel XMP-validated HyperX Memory to Support new ‘Haswell’ Platform

Subject: Memory | June 5, 2013 - 09:17 PM |
Tagged: kingston, haswell

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Fountain Valley, CA -- (June 5, 2013)-- Kingston Technology Company, Inc., the independent world leader in memory products, today announced a series of Intel® XMP-validated HyperX® memory solutions for the ‘Haswell’ 4th generation Core™ i7, i5 and i3 processors and Z87 chipset-based platforms.

Kingston® has HyperX memory in frequencies ranging from 1600MHz to 2666MHz, in various kits of two and four. The complete list of HyperX XMP-validated memory can be found here. More information on Kingston’s offerings for this new platform can be found here. HyperX memory is backed by a lifetime warranty and free technical support.

Kingston is celebrating 25 years in the memory industry. The company was founded on October 17, 1987, and has grown to become the largest third-party memory manufacturer in the world. The 25th anniversary video can be found here along with more information, including a timeline of Kingston's history. In addition, HyperX memory is celebrating its 10th anniversary. The first HyperX high-performance memory module was released in November 2002.

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Source: Kingston

Corsair Adding Gold Vengeance Pro DDR3 Modules To Lineup

Subject: Memory | June 4, 2013 - 10:15 PM |
Tagged: vengeance pro, ddr3, corsair, computex 2013, computex

PC Perspective motherboard reviewer Morry Teitelman posted a review of Corsair's latest Vengeance Pro DDR3 modules yesterday, and the memory did well enough in his testing to earn a PC Perspective Editor's Choice award. The 16GB DDR3-1866MHz Vengeance Pro DIMMS he reviewed are available now for $144. 8GB Vengeance Pro 1866MHz kits are around $80, and 32GB DDR3-1866  memory kits are $295. There are also other SKUs with even higher clockspeeds for bit more money. On the other hand, going with the 1600MHz kits that are available will save you about $20 versus 1866MHz if you will be using these in a systerm where you don't plan to overclock much (if at all). 

In addition to the blue, red, and silver colored Vengeance Pro kits mentioned in our review, Corsair is also making an additional gold colored SKU available. Note that the underlying memory hardware is not changing, just the aesthetics. The gold version was just added into the mix today, so while current reviews may not note a black and gold module option, one is coming.

Corsair Vengeance Pro DDR3 4 DIMMS.png

The new black and gold Vengeance Pro DDR3 DIMMs.

Therefore, if you were waiting for the Vengeance Pro to go on sale, but wishing that it better matched your gold-laden ECS or ASUS Gryphon motherboard, it might be worth holding off until the gold SKU hits the market (which should be very soon).

Also in Corsair news, the company teased an 8GB Vengeance Pro DDR3 memory kit clocked at an impressive 3200MHz (CAS11, 11-14-14-36 timings) at Computex for Haswell-based machines, but it is unclear exactly when this particular 2x4GB kit will be available.

The full press release is available below for reference.

Also read:

Source: Corsair

G.Skill Launches 32GB DDR3 3000MHz TridentX Series Memory

Subject: Memory | June 3, 2013 - 05:50 AM |
Tagged: xmp, overclocking, memory, haswell, G.Skill Trident X, G.Skill, ddr3 3000, ddr3

G.Skill is a company known for its DDR3 memory products and overclocking contests. It recently unveiled a new 32GB DDR3 RAM kit under its TridentX series that is clocked at an impressive 3,000 MHz!

The new G.Skill DDR3 3000MHz 32GB (4 x 8GB) memory kit is aimed at enthusiasts running Intel Haswell processors on Z87 motherboards. It features CAS12 latencies and can be run at 1.65V. It also supports Intel's XMP (Extreme Memory Profiles) standard, which will allow the motherboard to automatically configure the RAM for the full 3000 MHz clockspeed, though it requires a slight CPU overclock as well.

GSkill TridentX DDR3 3000MHz 32GB CAS12 1_65V.jpg

In G.Skill's own benchmark tests, the company managed to run its new 32GB TridentX memory at 3,000 MHz with CAS latencies of 12-14-14-35-CR2 at 1.65V. The Memtest Pro benchmark run was done on a system with an Intel Core i7-4770K and an ASUS Maximus VI Extreme Z87 motherboard. The Intel chip was running with a bus speed of 102.32 MHz and a multiplier of 39 for a total 3.99 GHz core clockspeed with all cores under load. Considering the i7-4770K is only rated for a maximum of DDR3-1600 memory, seeing it running DDR3 at 3GHz is impressive!

The new 32GB (4x8GB) TridentX kit is joined by  8GB (2x4GB) and 16GB (4x8GB) kits that are all rated for DDR3-3000 speeds. The kits continue to be covered by G.Skill's lifetime warranty. The company has not announced pricing or availability, but expect to pay a hefty premium for this super-fast RAM. Think upwards of $1,750 considering the existing 32GB DDR3-2933 C12 G.Skill kit is going for $1,700 on Newegg.

Source: G.Skill

AMD Unveils New Gamer Memory: MOAR RAMDISK!

Subject: Memory | May 8, 2013 - 12:01 AM |
Tagged: radeon ramdisk, radeon, memory, amd, 4GB, 2133, 1.65v

 

AMD makes memory!  Ok, they likely contract out memory.  Then they brand it!  Then they throw in some software to make RAMDisks out of all that memory that you are not using.  Let us face it; AMD is not particularly doing anything new here with memory.  It is very much a commodity market that is completely saturated with quality parts from multiple manufacturers.

So why is AMD doing it?  Well, I guess part of it is simply brand recognition and potentially another source of income to help pad the bottom line.  They will not sell these parts for a loss, and they will have buyers with the diehard AMD fans.  Tim covered the previous release of AMD memory pretty well, and he looked at the performance results of the free RAMDisk software that AMD bundled with the DIMMs.  It does exactly what it is supposed to, but of course it takes portions of memory away.  When dealing with upwards of 16 GB of memory for a desktop computer, sacrificing half of that is really not that big a deal unless heavy duty image and video editing are required.

amd_mem_01.jpg

*Tombraider not included with Radeon Memory.  Radeon RAMDisk instead!

Today AMD is announcing a new memory product and a new bundled version of the RAMDisk software.  The top end SKU is now the AMD Radeon RG2133 DDR-3 modules.  It comes in a package of up to 4 x 4GB DIMMS and carries a CAS latency of 10 with the voltage at a reasonable 1.65v.  These modules are programmed with both the Intel based XMP and the AMD based AMP (MP stands for Memory Profiles… if that wasn’t entirely obvious).  The modules themselves are reasonable in terms of size (they will fit in any board, even with larger heatsinks on the CPU).  AMD claims that they are all high quality parts, which again is not entirely surprising since I do not know of anyone who advertises that their DIMMS feature only the most mediocre memory modules available.

amd_mem_02.jpg

Faster memory is faster, water is wet, and Ken still needs a girlfriend.

AMD goes on to claim that faster memory does improve overall system performance.  Furthermore AMD has revealed that UV light is in fact a cancer causing agent, Cocoa Puffs will turn any milk brown, and passing gas in church will rarely be commented upon (unless it is truly rank or you start calling yourself “Legion”).  Many graphs were presented that essentially showed an overclocked APU with this memory will outperform a non-overclocked APU with DDR-3 1600 units.  Truly eye opening, to say the least.

amd_mem_03.jpg

How much RAMDisk can any one man take?  AMD wants to know!

The one big piece of the pie that we have yet to talk about is the enhanced version of Radeon RAMDisk (is Farva naming these things?).  This particular version can carve out up to 64 GB of memory for a RAMDisk!  I can tell you this now, me and my 8 GB of installed memory will get a LOT of mileage out of this one!  I can only imagine the product meeting.  “Hey, I’ve got a great idea!  We can give them up to 64 GB of RAMDisk!”  While another person replies, “How do you propose getting people above 64 GB, much less 32 GB of memory on a consumer level product…?”  After much hand wringing and mumbling someone comes up with, “I know!  They can span it across two motherboards!  That way they have to buy an extra motherboard AND a CPU!  Think of our attach rate!”  And there was much rejoicing.

amd_mem_04.jpg

Inconceivable!!!

So yes, more memory that goes faster is better.  Radeon RAMDisk is not just a comic superhero, it can improve overall system performance.  Combine the two and we have AMD Radeon Memory RG2133 with 64 GB of RAMDisk.  Considering that the top SKU will feature 4 x 4GB DIMMS, a user only needs to buy four kits and four motherboards and processors to get a 64GB RAMDisk.  Better throw in another CPU and motherboard so a user can at least have 16GB of memory available as, you know, memory.

Update and Clarification

Perhaps my tone was a bit too sarcastic, but I just am not seeing the value here.  Apparently (and I was not given this info before hand) the 4 x 4 GB kits with the 64 GB RAMDisk will retail at $155.  Taking a quick look at Newegg I see that a user can buy quite a few different 2 x 8 GB 2133 kits anywhere from $139 to $145 with similar or better latencies/voltages.  Around $155 users will get better latencies and voltages down to 1.5v.  For 4 x 4GB kits we again see prices start at the $139 mark, but there are a significant number of other kits with again better voltages and latencies from $144 through $155.

Users can also get the free version of the Radeon RAMDisk that will utilize up to 4GB of space.  There are multiple other software kits for not a whole lot of money (less than $10) that will provide you up to 16 GB of RAMDisk.  I just find the whole kit to be comparable to what is currently out there.  Offering a 64 GB RAMDisk for use with 16 GB of total system memory just seems to be really silly.  The only way that could possibly be interesting would be if you could allocate 8 GB of that onto RAM and the other 56 GB onto a fast SSD.  I do not believe that to be the case with this software, but I would love to be proved wrong.

Source: AMD

Kingston's Beast-ly new HyperX kit

Subject: Memory | April 15, 2013 - 04:44 PM |
Tagged: kingston, hyperX beast, DDR3-2400

At a speed of DDR3-2400 timings of 11-13-13-30 @ 2T are more than impressive and hint at the overclocking potential of these DIMMs.  They also come with two XPM settings, the one just mentioned which runs at 1.65V and a 2133 MHz mode which runs at 1.6V and similar timings.  Once TechPowerUp got their hands on the DIMMs they managed to hit 2634 MHz and tighten up the Command Rate to 1T.  Keep in mind those pretty heatspreaders may make your life difficult if your motherboard is crowded around the socket and your heatsink doesn't have much clearance.  That exact kit does not appear at NewEgg but a very similar 16GB kit does.

TPU_contents.jpg

"A rabid animal hungry for food, the Kingston HyperX Beast stampedes into the overclocking scene, ripping through our benchmarks like no other. Clocked in at 2400 MHz out of the box, these beasts are ready to take on whatever you want to feed them."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Source: TechPowerUp

Corsair Unleashes Vengeance Extreme, the World's Fastest Rated PC Memory Kits

Subject: Memory | March 14, 2013 - 04:13 PM |
Tagged: DDR3-3000, corsair, Vengeance Extreme, dual channel

Corsair is taking Xtreme Memory Profiles to the next level with an extremely limited release of DDR3-3000 2x4GB kits, for the low, low price of $750.  They list two motherboard with BIOSes capable of hitting that speed and perhaps higher for those willing to move to exotic cooling solutions using the included cooler.  The 1.65V is high but not insane, possibly due to the timings of 12-14-14-36 but you will probably need to up the power if you are intending on pushing these DIMMs past 3GHz.  You can try to pick them up directly from Corsair.

VENG_EXTREME_R_F.png

FREMONT, California — March 14, 2013 — Corsair, a worldwide designer and supplier of high-performance components to the PC hardware market, today announced new Vengeance Extreme 8GB dual-channel DDR3 memory kits rated at 3000MHz, the world's fastest rated production PC memory kits. Fitted with low profile "racing red" heat spreaders, the new 2x4GB memory kits operate at 3000MHz air-cooled, with latency settings of 12-14-14-36, at 1.65V. A Kingpin Cooling memory cooler is included for overclockers who want to use LN2 (liquid nitrogen) to reach memory speeds well beyond 3000MHz.

The extreme-speed 3000MHz rating of the Vengeance Extreme memory kits is the result of a rigorous internal four-stage hand-screening process performed by Corsair engineers. This process is passed by fewer than one in 50 memory ICs. Performance qualification is performed on select Intel Z77 based motherboards, including the ASUS P8Z77-I DELUXE and ASRock Z77 OC Formula. To hit their rated speeds, the modules require a 3rd Generation Intel Core unlocked processor with an Integrated Memory Controller capable of running 3000MHz.

“We are focused on helping enthusiasts and overclockers push the boundaries of PC performance," said Thi La, Senior VP and GM of Memory and Enthusiast Component Products at Corsair. “Our engineering team's hard work has led to new performance optimization techniques for memory, which we are pleased to debut in our new Vengeance Extreme memory."

Pricing and Availability
The Vengeance Extreme 3000MHz 8GB memory kits are priced at $749.99 USD and will be available exclusively from Corsair.com in March. Quantities of these hand-built modules will be extremely limited.

Source: Corsair