EVGA Winter 2016 Prize Pack and Giveaway!!

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards, Motherboards, Cases and Cooling | February 2, 2016 - 07:07 PM |
Tagged: Z170, PSU, power supply, motherboard, GTX 970, giveaway, ftw, evga, contest

For many of you reading this, the temperature outside has fallen to its deepest levels, making it hard to even bare the thought of going outdoors. What would help out a PC enthusiast and gamer in this situation? Some new hardware, delivered straight to your door, to install and assist in warming up your room, that's what!

PC Perspective has partnered up with EVGA to offer up three amazing prizes for our fans. They include a 750 G2 power supply (obviously with a 750 watt rating), a Z170 FTW motherboard and a GTX 970 SSC Gaming ACX 2.0+ graphics card. The total prize value is over $650 based on MSRPs!

All you have to do to enter is follow the easy steps in the form below. 

We want to thank EVGA for its support of PC Perspective in this contest and over the years. Here's to a great 2016 for everyone!

EVGA Winter 2016 Giveaway!!

 

Never heard of Skyrmions? One day you may have a drive full of them.

Subject: General Tech | February 2, 2016 - 06:36 PM |
Tagged: skyrmions

In the search for higher density data storage some rather arcane materials are being studied for their unique magnetic properties.  The latest research being conducted is with extremely thin multilayered films, in this specific case iridium-cobalt-platinum films.  These materials display the ability to create incredibly small magnetic features called skyrmions, an area where the magnetic field is rotated compared to the surrounding material and can be coerced to appear and disappear.  This is the essence of magnetic data storage, on a much smaller scale you see in current storage material.  There are certainly a lot of hurdles to overcome, the experiment described at Nanotechweb is the first to form skymirons at room temperature and they used an X-ray source as the write head.  It is still quite interesting to read about, even if we are a long way from seeing it considered for use in data storage.

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"Researchers in France, Switzerland, the UK and Germany say they have observed nanoscale chiral skyrmions at room temperature for the first time. Skyrmions, which are quasi-particle magnetic spin configurations with a whirling vortex-like structure, could be used to make ultrahigh-density data storage technologies and nanodigital electronic devices with greatly improved data transfer speeds and processing power."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: Nanotechweb

Your Cat6 cabling not behaving as you would expect? Turns out that is not a Fluke

Subject: General Tech | February 1, 2016 - 09:49 PM |
Tagged: fluke, fail, cat6

The difference between Cat5(e) and Cat 6 will not be obvious for home users but is certainly noticeable in large business deployments.  Cat5 and 5e are capable of providing 100MHz whereas Cat6 is rated to 250MHz, assuming it is installed to specifications.  In addition to the increased frequency, Cat6 is has much greater protection against crosstalk and system noise which is far more important to many sysadmins. 

Previously we benefited from the honour system in place, many Cat 5 cables actually met the Cat 5e specification but it seems that this is not the case with Cat 6.  Hack a Day has heard word through a cable provider that Fluke noticed that 80% of the Cat 6 tested with their equipment does not meet specification, in many cases it does not even meet Cat 5e specs.  Since a Fluke line tester capable of analyzing network cabling to this degree of accuracy costs north of $10,000 not all companies are going to have their networks fully tested for compliance.  This may be why you are seeing odd behaviour on your network.

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"So they did some research and purchased a Fluke certification tester for a measly 12,000 US dollars. While they were purchasing the device, they ran across an interesting tidbit in the fluke knowledge base. Fluke said that 80% of the consumer Cat 6 cables they tested didn’t begin to meet the Cat 6 specification."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Hack a Day

G.Skill Rolls Out Refreshed Mechanical Gaming Keyboards

Subject: General Tech | February 1, 2016 - 05:48 AM |
Tagged: ripjaws, RGB LED, mechanical keyboard, G.Skill, Cherry MX

Memory maker G.Skill recently announced a refresh of its mechanical keyboard line that tweaks the KM780 series and cuts $10 off of the MSRP pricing. The two new refreshed products are the Ripjaws KM780R RGB and KM780R MX.

GSkill KM780R-MX front.png

The new keyboards use an aluminum plate/base, Cherry MX switches, and a black anodized finish on the frame. The KM780R MX is backlit by red LEDs while the KM780R RGB can have custom per-key backlighting. Both feature a full QWERTY layout plus number pad as well as media playback keys, a LED volume level display, and six macro keys (three on-board key profiles). There is also USB and analog audio pass-through ports.

G.Skill is offering the new gaming keyboards in several models depending on your choice of key switch. Specifically, users can choose from Cherry MX blue, brown, or red switches. Connecting via USB, they employ anti-ghosting and full N-key rollover tech as well.

GSkill KM780R-RGB.png

The every so slightly cheaper KM780R series does away with its predecessors bundled extra gaming key caps and key removal tool. The KM780R MX has an MSRP of $120 while the KM780R RGB model has an MSRP of $159.99 (Note that the brown and red variants are actually $140 on Amazon right now, but the Cherry MX blue version is not on sale.)

While I have not used them, the original models from last year appear to have garnered quite a bit of praise in reviews (particularly from AnandTech). It seems like G.Skill has not changed much and the R variants are more of the same for a bit less, and that's probably a good thing. I'm looking forward to seeing full reviews though, of course.

Have you tried the memory giant's other products before?

Also read: Mechanical Keyboard Switches Explained and Compared by Scott Michaud @ PC Perspective

Source: G.Skill

Java Browser Plug-in Soon Killed Off by Oracle

Subject: General Tech | January 31, 2016 - 12:05 AM |
Tagged: web browser, web, shockwave flash, shockwave director, oracle, Java

After decades of semi-ubiquitous usage, Oracle has announced plans to stop providing the Java plug-in for web browsers. It will still be available in the upcoming Java 9 platform, but classified as a deprecated feature.

ie-wheeee-dead.jpg

This has nothing to do with JavaScript, which is a scripting language that web browsers use. JavaScript is not a plug-in, and it's very secure in terms of the machine the browsers run on. Pretty much all exploits that we see either trick the user to download and run a program, have them disclose sensitive information (passwords, identity, etc.) to the wrong people, try to make the browser impossible to use until it is shut down and restarted, or launch a plug-in that is the actual problem. The joke is “Java is to JavaScript as Car is to Carpet” -- but that's not true: cars often have carpets.

Java, Shockwave Director, and Shockwave Flash filled in a huge gap in Web standards during the late 90s and early 2000s. Plug-ins were about the only way to access files, per-pixel 2D animation functions, and even access to 3D graphics hardware. Web browsers can do almost all of that now, albeit file input and output is limited to individual files, because you don't want every website to be able to read and write files (and site-specific data lockers with APIs like IndexedDB and Web Storage) on the user's hard drive without the user's explicit control.

As such, browsers are trying to kill off native plug-ins. This could be a problem for games like Battlefield 3 and 4, which (Update Jan 30th @ 7:51pm: Used to... it's apparently been a while. Thanks wileecyte in the comments.) require plug-ins to launch the native application, but the browser vendors have been expressing their desires for quite some time. Even companies that are heavily invested in plug-ins for their products, like Oracle, are finally giving up.

Source: Ars Technica

So That's Where Jim Keller Went To... Tesla Motors...

Subject: General Tech, Processors, Mobile | January 29, 2016 - 10:28 PM |
Tagged: tesla, tesla motors, amd, Jim Keller, apple

Jim Keller, a huge name in the semiconductor industry for his work at AMD and Apple, recently left AMD before the launch of the Zen architecture. This made us nervous, because when a big name leaves a company before a product launch, it could either be that their work is complete... or they're evacuating before a stink-bomb detonates and the whole room smells like rotten eggs.

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It turns out a third option is possible: Elon Musk offers you a job making autonomous vehicles. Jim Keller's job title at Tesla will be Vice President of Autopilot Hardware Engineering. I could see this position being enticing, to say the least, even if you are confident in your previous employer's upcoming product stack. It doesn't mean that AMD's Zen architecture will be either good or bad, but it nullifies the earlier predictions, when Jim Keller left AMD, at least until further notice.

We don't know who approached who, or when.

Another point of note: Tesla Motors currently uses NVIDIA Tegra SoCs in their cars, who are (obviously) competitors of Jim Keller's former employer, AMD. It sounds like Jim Keller is moving into a somewhat different role than he had at AMD and Apple, but it could be interesting if Tesla starts taking chip design in-house, to customize the chip to their specific needs, and take away responsibilities from NVIDIA.

The first time he was at AMD, he was the lead architecture of the Athlon 64 processor, and he co-authored x86-64. When he worked at Apple, he helped design the Apple A4 and A5 processors, which were the first two that Apple created in-house; the first three iPhone processors were Samsung SoCs.

Sharing is good ... until it starts eating your bandwidth

Subject: General Tech | January 29, 2016 - 07:32 PM |
Tagged: security, isp, wifi

ISPs have stumbled onto a new money making venture, renting out your wireless internet connection to third parties so that those companies can provide public WiFi to their customers.  Sources told The Inquirer that some ISPs already do this without informing their customers and that it will likely be a common industry practice by 2017.  Theoretically you are allowed to opt out but since your ISP may not have told their users they are doing this; how would the average customer know to request this be turned off?

This raises several concerns, especially here in North America thanks to our pathetic internet services.  Most users have a data cap and the ISPs have little reason to spend resources to properly monitor who is using the bandwidth, their customers or random passersby.  As well the speeds of most customers are low enough that they may see degradation of their service if numerous passersby connect to their WiFi.  Putting the monetary concerns to the side there are also serious security concerns.  Once a user has access to your WiFi router they are most of the way into your network and services such as UPnP and unprotected ports leave you vulnerable to attack.

Change the password your provider put on the router and consider reaching out to them to find out if you have been unwillingly sharing your bandwidth already, or if you might be doing so in the near future.

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"Companies are going to be selling a lot more public Wi-Fi plans over the next few years and it's going to be home Wi-Fi users who'll be the backbone of the network, according to analysts from Juniper Research."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Register

Looks like we've got a rat, the browser formerly known as IE is spilling the beans

Subject: General Tech | January 28, 2016 - 07:25 PM |
Tagged: Privacy, microsoft, edge

Microsoft is revisiting an old issue with private browsing which we have seen too many times unfortunately.  In 2010 Firefox's private browsing broke and left site visits on your computer and in 2013 Chrome went through the same issue.  More recently it was discovered that when Chrome interacted with an NVIDIA GPU, sites could also be retrieved.  Now it is Edge's turn, the browser stores your page visits in tables under <user>\appdata\local\microsoft\windows\history even when using InPrivate Mode.  This will be resolved soon but for now if you are secretly ... ah, shopping for a loved one you might want to use a different browser, VPN or other measure.  There is more info over at The Inquirer

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"BURGEONING ORWELLIAN nightmare corporation Microsoft has once again been found lacking in the security department, this time for the new and improved Edge browser in Windows 10."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer

Podcast #384 - Corsair Carbide 600Q, GDDR5X, a Dual Fiji Graphics card and more!

Subject: General Tech | January 28, 2016 - 06:38 PM |
Tagged: podcast, video, corsair, carbide, 600q, 600c, gddr5x, jdec, amd, Fiji, fury x, fury x2, scythe, Ninja 4, logitech, g502 spectrum, Intel, Tigerlake, nzxt, Manta

PC Perspective Podcast #384 - 01/28/2016

Join us this week as we discuss the Corsair Carbide 600Q, GDDR5X, a Dual Fiji Graphics card and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, and Allyn Malventano

Subscribe to the PC Perspective YouTube Channel for more videos, reviews and podcasts!!

Landlocked Homeworld; a glimpse at Kharak

Subject: General Tech | January 27, 2016 - 06:47 PM |
Tagged: gaming, Homeworld, Deserts of Kharak

The newest Homeworld game is a prequel covering how the fractious clans of Kharak fought over an ancient relic found in the deserts of their dying world, presumably the Mothership of the two previous Homeworld games.  From the trailers and descriptions provided in this Rock, Paper, SHOTGUN article the game will play very similarly to Homeworld, most of your assets will be restricted to hugging the ground but their is evidence of vertical terrain, flying units and perhaps even orbital units.  In exchange for that your carrier, the replacement Mothership in this game, it is mobile and heavily armed and so will play a big role in your strategy.  Read on to learn more about the game right here.

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"Homeworld: Deserts of Kharak [official site] is a prequel to the legendary Homeworld space real-time strategy games, but this time – heresy! – set on land, as the Kushan race battle angry clans to reclaim ancient technologies found on the sandy planet they currently call home."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Gaming

Ever been so sick of a song you considered veering off the road to make it stop?

Subject: General Tech | January 27, 2016 - 06:24 PM |
Tagged: Usenix Enigma, security, iot

The good news is that this particular bug has been addressed but it does not make the vulnerability any less terrifying.  A mere 18 seconds of playtime on a compromised audio CD in your car is enough to insert the attack code and gain complete control over your cars computer controlled systems.  This particular vulnerability was discovered in 2010, long before the more recent vulnerabilities you would have seen all over various media.  You could shut off the engines, forcibly unlock the doors, interfere with steering and many other functions that could well cause serious damage at highway speeds or in other scenarios. 

When placing the blame, The Inquirer makes sure to point out that you should not look to the car companies as it is the software providers who are the source of the problem.  Thanks to various corporate policies no car company has access to all of the source code running in their products so a security audit will not help.  Even better is the inclusion of a government-mandated OBD-II port which allows complete control over your cars system; which you should not touch as simply plugging into it would be a crime in the USA.  There is some good news, this vulnerability resulted in Fiat Chrysler recalling 1.4 million cars at a cost of about a quarter of a billion dollars ... an expensive mistake that may convince them to change their software implementation processes.

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"The modern car's operating system is such a mess that researchers were once able to get complete control of a vehicle by playing a song laced with malicious code. Malware encoded in the track was executed after the file was loaded from a CD and processed by a buggy parser."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

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Source: The Register

New, from the company that brought you SuperFish ...

Subject: General Tech | January 26, 2016 - 05:13 PM |
Tagged: security, Lenovo, idiots

Lenovo chose the third most popular password of 2015 to secure its ShareIT for Windows application and for bonus points have made it hard coded, which there is utterly no excuse for in this day and age.  If you aren't familiar with the software, it is another Dropbox type app which allows you to share files and folders, apparently with anyone now that this password ridiculousness has been exposed.  As you read on at The Inquirer the story gets even better, files are transferred in the clear without any encryption and it even creates an open WiFi hotspot for you, to make sharing your files even easier for all and sundry.  There are more than enough unintentional vulnerabilities in software and hardware, we really don't need companies programming them in on purpose.  If you have ShareIT, you should probably DumpIT.

***Update***

We received word that there is an updated version of ShareIT available for those who do use the app and would like to continue to do so.

They can also access the latest versions which are posted and available for download on the Lenovo site. The updated Android version of SHAREit is also available for download on the Google Play store. Please visit the Lenovo security advisory page for the latest information and updates: (https://support.lenovo.com/us/en/product_security/len_4058)

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"HOLY COW! Lenovo may have lost its mind. The firm has created vulnerabilities in ShareIT that could be exploited by anyone who can guess that '12345678' could be a password."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer

Have you tried the Steam Controller yet?

Subject: General Tech | January 25, 2016 - 06:27 PM |
Tagged: input, Steam Controller

The claims seem suspect; how exactly can a Steam Controller replace a mouse and keyboard when gaming?  That suspicion is being tested over at The Tech Report who recently tried out Valve's new Steam Controller, comparing it not only to a standard PC input setup but also to a XBox controller.  For the test they used Rocket League, Team Fortress 2, Just Cause 3, and Helldivers with mixed results.  In the end the Steam Controller was just not as useful as the Logitech M570 trackball, wireless keyboard, and Xbox 360 controller the reviewer is used to.  That said, with a lot of practice and time spent tweaking your input profiles you could find the Steam Controller is for you ... if you want it.

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"Valve's Steam Controller is supposed to obviate the mouse and keyboard for PC gaming in the living room. We put our thumbs on the Steam Controller's twin trackpads and took it for a spin to see whether it does the job."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Make yourself a WiFi camera remote

Subject: General Tech | January 25, 2016 - 05:40 PM |
Tagged: wifi, camera, DIY, iot

Hack a Day has posted a perfect example of how inexpensive and easy it is to build yourself useful things instead of shopping for expensive electronics.  If you have looked at the prices of cameras or adapters which allow you to wirelessly take a picture you have probably been disappointed, but you don't have to stay that way.  Instead, take an existing manual remote trigger, add in a WiFi enabled SoC module like the ESP8266 suggested in the video, download and compile the code and the next thing you know you will have a camera with wireless focus and shutter trigger.  Not too shabby for a ~$5 investment.

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"It’s just ridiculous how cheap and easy it is to do some things today that were both costly and difficult just two or three years ago. Case in point: Hackaday.io user [gamaral] built a WiFi remote control for his Canon E3 camera out of just three parts"

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: Hack a Day

If want great audio and don't care about the price; HiFiMAN HE-1000

Subject: General Tech | January 22, 2016 - 06:47 PM |
Tagged: hifiman, headphones, HE-1000, audio

HiFiMAN have been producing mid level and high end audio products for quite some time, straddling the line between affordable and audiophile quality.  The HE-1000 are of the aforementioned audiophile level, at $3000 you really have to have discerning ears to want to pick up these cans.  The headset is quite pretty, built with leather, wood, and aluminium with soft cloth for the earcups and a window blind design on the exterior which HiFiMAN claims has a positive effect on the audio quality.  techPowerUp tested these headphones out, you can read the description of their experience in the audio soundstage these headphones create in their review ... or not.

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"HiFiMAN is constantly developing their planar technology, and today, we will take a look at their latest state-of-the-art headphone. It is dubbed the HE-1000 and features a nanometer thick diaphragm, leather headband, and milled aluminum. We take HiFiMAN's most audacious and pricey headphone for a ride!"

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Audio Corner

 

Source: techPowerUp

Cortana, where is my app?

Subject: General Tech | January 22, 2016 - 05:15 PM |
Tagged: microsoft, Windows Store, windows 10

If the complaints of the developers in this story over at The Register are accurate then the problem with the Windows Store might not be that there are no good apps but instead that you simply can't find them.  If a developer can't find their own app in the store using keywords in the title or description or even the ones they submitted to the store then how can you expect to?  If the only good way to find an app is to know its exact name, how many apps are there in the store that no one but the developer has even seen?  It is still possible that an improved search function will not help the Windows Store but at this point its reputation could not get all that much worse.

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"Looking at the developer forums though, it seems that official guidance and assistance for this issue is not easy to find, which will not help Microsoft in its efforts to establish a strong Windows 10 app ecosystem."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: The Register

Crystal Dynamics Reveals Minimum Specifications for Rise of the Tomb Raider on the PC

Subject: General Tech | January 22, 2016 - 07:06 AM |
Tagged: tomb raider, pc gaming, min specs, can it run

Crystal Dynamics has revealed the minimum system requirements for Rise of the Tomb Raider on PC. This latest Lara Croft adventure sees the ever-resilient tomb raider following in the footsteps of her father in search of an artifact said to grant immortality amidst the lost city of Kitezh. Fortunately for gamers, Rise of the Tomb Raider has quite a low bar for entry with modest minimum system requirements. You will need more powerful hardware than its 2013 predecessor (Tomb Raider), but it is still quite manageable.

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PC gamers will need a 64-bit version of Windows, a dual core Intel Core i3-2100 (2 core, 4 thread at 3.1 GHz) or, for example, AMD FX 4100 processor, 6 GB of system memory, 25 GB of storage space for all the game files, and, of course, a graphics card with 2 GB of video memory such as the NVIDIA GTX 650 or AMD Radeon HD7770. Naturally, hardware with higher specifications/capabilities will get you better performance and visuals, but the above is what you will need to play.

Minimum PC System Requirements:

  • Dual Core Processor (e.g. Core i3-2100 or FX 4100)
  • 6 GB RAM
  • 25 GB Available Storage Space
  • 2 GB Graphics Card (e.g. GTX 650 or Radeon HD7770)

For those curious, Tomb Raider (2013) required XP SP3 32-bit, a dual core Intel Core 2 Duo E6300 or Athlon 64 X2 4050+ CPU, 1 GB of RAM (2 GB for Vista), and an NVIDIA 8600 or AMD HD2600 XT GPU with 512MB of video memory.

Rise of the Tomb Raider will reportedly add new stealth and crafting components along with new weapons and options for close quarters combat. Further, the game will feature day and night cycles with realistic weather which should make for cold snow-filled nights in Siberia as well as opportunities to sneak up on unwitting guards freezing their buns off!

The game is set to release on January 28th for the PC and joins the the Xbox One version that launched back in November 2015 where it will be a timed exclusive (it will come to the PS4 later this year).

Personally, I am excited for this game. I picked up its predecessor during a Steam sale for super cheap only to let it sit in my inventory for about a year. It was one of those 'I'll play it eventually, but it's not really a priority' things where the price finally got me (heh). Little did I know how wrong I was, because once I finally got around to firing up the game, I played it near constantly until I beat it! It was a surprisingly fun reboot of the series, and I am hopeful that RofTR will be more of the same! 

Source: Bit-Tech

Windows 10 Build 11102 Released to Fast Ring Insiders

Subject: General Tech | January 21, 2016 - 11:39 PM |
Tagged: windows 10, microsoft

I wasn't planning on reporting every Windows 10 Insider build, but I actually have something to say about this one. The last couple of builds were examples of Microsoft switching to a faster release cycle for preview users, although the known issues list were quite benign. The semi-frequent upgrade cycles would shake users away from the Insider program, or transition to Slow.

They now seem ready to start rolling back to less QA for Fast users.

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Five issues are known about build 11102. First, internal changes to the Windows Graphics architecture cause some games to crash on launch, full screen, or resolution changes. The Witcher 3, Fallout 4, Tomb Raider, Assassin's Creed, and Metal Gear Solid V are known to be affected by this bug, but other games (and maybe even other software) could be affected too. Second, screen readers and other accessibility software may crash randomly. If you require those accommodations, then this build could make your device functionally unusable to you.

Beyond those two, big issues, three other ones are present. There is an error message on login with a workaround, a breaking change for old wireless drivers that you should probably upgrade beforehand if you rely upon wireless to download drivers, and “The Connect button does not show up in Action Center.”

Microsoft is currently updating the deep insides of the OS, which means that they will be poking around the source code in weird places. Once it's completed, this should make Windows more maintainable, especially for multiple types of hardware. But again, if you're not wanting to be a part of this, switch to Slow or leave Insider.

Source: Microsoft

Podcast #383 - Acer Predator X34, ASUS X99-M, AMD Q4 Earnings and more!

Subject: General Tech | January 21, 2016 - 07:34 PM |
Tagged: x99-m, X170, X150, video, Silent Base 800, Q4 2015, Predator X34, podcast, gigabyte, g-sync, freesync, earnings, be quiet, asus, amd, acer

PC Perspective Podcast #383 - 01/21/2016

Join us this week as we discuss the Acer Predator X34, ASUS X99-M, AMD Q4 Earnings and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, and Allyn Malventano

Subscribe to the PC Perspective YouTube Channel for more videos, reviews and podcasts!!

 

Know anyone who uses the Intel Driver Update Utility? Update the updater ASAP

Subject: General Tech | January 21, 2016 - 05:52 PM |
Tagged: Intel, intel driver update utility, security

The Intel Driver Update Utility is not the most commonly found application on PCs but someone you know may have stumbled upon it or had it installed by Geek Squad or the local equivalent.  Since Windows Vista the tool has been available, it checks your system for any Intel parts, from your APU to your NIC and then looks for any applicable drivers that are available.  Unfortunately it was doing so over a non-SSL URL which leaves the utility wide open to a man in the middle attack and you really do not want a compromised NIC driver.  The Inquirer reports today that Intel quietly updated the tool on January 19th to resolve the issue, ensuring all communication and downloads are over SSL.  If you know anyone using this tool, recommend they update it immediately.

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"Intel has issued a fix for a major security vulnerability in a driver utility tool that could have allowed a man-in-the-middle attack and a malware maelstrom on victims' computers."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: The Inquirer