Rumor: Abu Dhabi Fund Seeks to Sell GlobalFoundries

Subject: General Tech | November 29, 2015 - 04:45 PM |

Several years ago, AMD spun off their chip manufacturing infrastructure into a company, which was named GlobalFoundries, and became a fabless integrated circuit designer. This transaction meant that AMD would be free to shop around when they needed something printed, and they wouldn't need to pay for the upfront expenses. That burden would be placed on the shoulders of stakeholders in GlobalFoundries, and of course the revenue they acquire from their larger pool of customers.


Image Credit: Wikipedia

Speaking of their stakeholders, GlobalFoundries is wholly owned by Advanced Technology Investment Company, which is owned by Mubadala Development Company, which is owned by the government of Abu Dhabi. GlobalFoundries merged with Chartered Semiconductor and was actually paid by IBM to acquire their fab business, at a reward of $1.5 billion USD and binding IBM to a ten-year exclusivity deal for server processors, which helped bolster the company. Oil prices have been fluctuating though, and sources tell Bloomberg that Abu Dhabi is interested in selling some or all of GlobalFoundries at a valuation of around $15-20 billion USD.

The report stops there, without declaring any potential candidates, but speculation doesn't. A lot of it just sounds like listing names who have lots of cash. If the source is even accurate, we don't know who are involved or how serious they are.

Source: Bloomberg

Old Video About an Older Gaming System...

Subject: General Tech | November 29, 2015 - 07:33 AM |
Tagged: snes, retro, Nintendo

So I missed this one until yesterday, when Dave Voyles of Microsoft tweeted it out. While the video was published in 2011, it doesn't have too many views and this topic only gets better with age (pretty much).


Image Credit: "Wikipedia SNES PAL" by JCD1981NL - Own work
Licensed under CC BY 3.0 via Commons

The narrator opens up a Super Nintendo, which is a PAL kit for North Americans wondering why the casing looks so different. The console has a dedicated CPU, RAM, two sound processors with RAM, and a four-package video chipset of two graphics chips and two VRAM packages. The two video chips, each paired with a package of RAM, are used in tandem but apparently cannot see into each others memory. This reminds me of the split-memory architecture on the PS3, which provides 256MB to the Cell processor and 256MB to the NVIDIA GPU.

Another interesting note is that, because the sound system has its own 8-bit Sony processor, sound effects and music will continue to play when the main system freezes. I never really thought about it until I watched this video, but I believe I've actually experienced that a few times in the early/mid 90s. I just never thought much about it because computers were still somewhat magical back then.

Source: YouTube

Shame about the name but power over WiFi would be nice

Subject: General Tech | November 27, 2015 - 01:54 PM |
Tagged: poWiFi, wireless power, iot

It is going to take some work as it is not currently that impressive but the experiment at Cornell University shows that power over WiFi is not impossible.  The experiment was not all that impressive, they charged a Jawbone headset @ 2.3mA and after 2.5 hours which they managed to charge the battery to 41% over a distance of 5-7cm.  Those results are poor compared to Qi and other wireless charging solutions on the market but are promising.  The power is transmitted by a wireless router that can also send and receive data so for wireless cameras and other low powered devices which transmit data this could be quite useful.  You can read the research paper by following the links from Hack a Day.


"There have been a few reports of power over WiFi (PoWiFi) on the intertubes lately. If this is a real thing it’s definitely going to blow all of the IoT fanboys skirts up (sorry to the rest of you *buzzword* fanboys, the IoT kids flash-mobbed the scene and they mean business)."

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Source: Hack a Day

PC Gaming Services Want Your Black Friday Money Too

Subject: General Tech | November 26, 2015 - 11:22 PM |
Tagged: uplay, steam, pc gaming, origin, GOG

While everyone's in a turkey and gravy coma, retailers are hoping that you'll feel a bit browsy with your drowsy. Black Friday deals are popping up everywhere; some are good, but some are token at best... including the Black Friday sale on tokens at the local arcade.

Too soon?


Anyway, four (edit: Fixed typo) of the largest PC gaming services are Steam, UPLAY, Origin, and Steam is predictably the largest sale. It's another “Exploration Sale,” which is another way of saying, “Here's a few examples of great deals; browse for crap you like. You might find something cheaper. I dunno.” Speaking of a few examples, Elite Dangerous is now just a third of its price. Grand Theft Auto V is now reduced too, although it's not yet in the impulse buy territory. Call of Duty Black Ops III also received a little chop in price, which is unusual for the franchise. You'll probably want to browse Steam in general, especially if there's a game that you've been eying but couldn't justify buying yet.

UPlay's sale is a bit more... weird. If you played Tropico 5 but put it down before buying the DLC, the pack of boosters is now 75% off ($11 CDN here). Surprisingly, the vast majority of sales have nothing to do with Ubisoft titles, and the three exceptions are from 2013 / 2014.

Origin is a bit more rounded in terms of old and new titles. FIFA 16, released just this fall, is about 40% off where I am. Tomb Raider is in the mid-single digits of dollars. Battlefield Hardline is about $10. Do not buy The Witcher 3 here though, if the Canadian prices carry over to the US. The sale even extends back to Command & Conquer: The Ultimate Collection, NHL 09, and Medal of Honor: Airborne. It just keeps scrolling.

Now for GOG. This is, again, a sale that you should probably browse. If you were interested in The Witcher 3, purchasing it from GOG instead of Steam will get you the same sale but DRM-free. Its new price is $29.99 USD, unless you're Canadian. We get it for $23.49 USD at GOG or $29.99 CDN at Steam. I guess they feel like giving a slightly larger discount to compensate for the lack of turkey-goggles. Browse the “On Sale” tab in the bottom right before you leave too.

The Internet of Things loves to share

Subject: General Tech | November 26, 2015 - 12:22 PM |
Tagged: idiots, iot, security

You would think people would be be taken aback if someone suggested saving money by using the same key on every new house built in a neighbourhood, if so you don't work for companies developing hardware for the Internet of Things.  In a recent survey of  4,000 embedded devices from 70 hardware makers, Sec Consult found that many had the same hardwired SSH login keys and server-side SSL certificates.  The numbers they provided The Register were a total 580 private keys were found distributed over all the analyzed devices, of which at least 230 are in already in use on the internet.  To be fair this is not uncommon in consumer level firmware as companies do not even bother to check over the source code let alone change the security keys held within but it is a huge security risk.  For a glimpse at how bad some of these supposedly secure certs and keys are read on at The Register.


"Lazy makers of home routers and the Internet of Things are reusing the same small set of hardcoded security keys, leaving them open to hijacking en masse, researchers have warned."

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Source: The Register

Bringing mods to the post-nuclear wastelands of Massachusetts

Subject: General Tech | November 25, 2015 - 01:41 PM |
Tagged: fallout 4, mod, gaming

The modders over at the Nexus community are already hard at work creating mods for Fallout 4 and Rock, Paper, SHOTGUN have compiled a list of the best ones currently out there.  After a quick tutorial on how to apply mods they jump into the list and of them all the first one may be the most useful as it allows you to tweak your display resolution, mouse sensitivity, field of view and the many other settings you might have expect to be changeable in the game itself.  From there they move onto improved lighting, longer death cam viewing, a higher settlement budget and even dialogue expansion.  Check out what is there or head over to Nexus Mods to see what others catch your interest.


"While official mod support for Fallout 4 [official site] hasn’t arrived just yet, Nexus Mods have opened their proverbial gates. Their community is fast at work creating handy customisations and helpful leg-ups to see you right as you dive head first into the irradiated unknown."

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There's data in dem der lightbulbs; moves really fast too!

Subject: General Tech | November 25, 2015 - 12:53 PM |
Tagged: wireless, li-fi, 1GBps

Li-Fi is a new experimental wireless data transmission technology which sends data using the same lights that illuminate the space you are in, at such frequencies and intensities that your brain does not process any change in lighting which your eyes might capture.  It transmits at an incredible speed, under perfect conditions in the the lab they saw 224GBps and recently have successfully transmitted at 1GBps in the field.  Yes, that is 1GB per second of data transfer, light travels rather quickly after all.  There are limits on where this technology can be used, in large spaces signals from different lights could interfere with each other and if you are outside then you will not be able to benefit but for offices and the home this could be rather impressive to behold.  Read more about the researchers and how these lightbulbs could be tied into existing lighting at The Inquirer.


"BOFFINS HAVE field tested Li-Fi for the first time, achieving wireless speeds 100 times faster than WiFi."

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Source: The Inquirer

Deals of the Day: 960GB SSD for $199, $69 Athlon X4, GTX 970 Price Drop

Subject: General Tech | November 24, 2015 - 02:55 PM |
Tagged: SanDisk Ultra II, MSI GTX 970 Gaming, GTX 970, 960GB SSD

The internet is full of sales this week, and there are some great PC hardware deals out there beginning with the best price per GB on an SSD we've ever seen.


At $199.99 shipped this 960 GB SanDisk Ultra II SSD is a stunning $0.20/GB, and offers good speeds for a SATA III drive with up to 550 MB/s reads and 500 MB/s writes, along with "n-Cache 2.0" which SanDisk explains is "a large, non-volatile write cache (which) consolidates small writes to boost random write performance".

What better to fill up that huge SSD than a library of games, and if you're in the market for a new graphics card to drive them there are some excellent deals out there. A good mid-range GPU option is the oft-maligned NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970, and memory controversy aside it's a very high performer for the money. Lately prices have dropped a bit, and there some great options out there when you factor in rebates.


While you can find some lower-cost GTX 970's out there this is a good deal for one of MSI's overclocked Gaming series cards. And if you're looking for a quad-core processor to help drive a new GPU, how about AMD's ultra-affordable Athlon X4 860k, now under $70!


It's nice to see prices starting to drop on some solid upgrades, and we're currently working on our annual holiday gift guide with more recommendations for a tech-filled holiday season. Stay tuned!

What the hell Dell?

Subject: General Tech | November 24, 2015 - 12:42 PM |
Tagged: dell, superfish, security, edellroot

As Scott mentioned yesterday, Dell refused to learn from Lenovo's lesson and repeated the exact same mistake with eDellRoot, a self-signed root CA cert with an unknown purpose.  Unlike SuperFish which was to allow targeted ads to be displayed eDellRoot serves an unclear purpose apart from a mention of Microsoft-like "easier customer support" but it exposes you to the exact same security risks as SuperFish does.  You could remove the cert manually, however as it resides in Dell.Foundation.Agent.Plugins.eDell.dll it will return on next boot and can return on fresh Windows installs via Dell driver updates, something which will be of great concern to their business customers.

Dell has finally responded to the issue, "The recent situation raised is related to an on-the-box support certificate intended to provide a better, faster and easier customer support experience. Unfortunately, the certificate introduced an unintended security vulnerability." and provided a process to remove the certificate from the machine permanently in this Word Document.  You can check for the presence of the cert on your machine in those two links. 

However the best was yet to come as researchers have found a second cert as well as an expired Atheros Authenticode cert for BlueTooth and private key on a limited amount of new Dell computers as well.  As Dell made no mention of these additional certificates in their statement to the press it is hard to give them the benefit of the doubt.  The Bluetooth cert will not make you vulnerable to a man in the middle attack however the second cert is as dangerous as eDellRoot and can be used to snoop on encrypted communications.  The second cert was found on a SCADA machine which is, as they say, a bad thing. 

We await Dell's response to the second discovery as well as further research to determine how widespread the new certs actually are.  So far Dell XPS 15 laptops, M4800 workstations, and Inspiron desktops and laptops have been found to contain these security issues.  The chances of you falling victim to a man in the middle attack thanks to these security vulnerabilities are slim but not zero so be aware of them and keep your eyes out for them on your systems.  With Lenovo and Dell both being caught, it will be interesting to see if HP and other large vendors will learn this lesson or if it will take a third company being caught exposing their customers to unnecessary risks.


"A second root certificate and private key, similar to eDellRoot along with an expired Atheros Authenticode cert and private key used to sign Bluetooth drivers has been found on a Dell Inspiron laptop. The impact of these two certs is limited compared to the original eDellRoot cert."

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Source: Slashdot

Windows 10 Tool Now Reverted to Build 10240

Subject: General Tech | November 23, 2015 - 08:15 PM |
Tagged: windows 10, microsoft

UPDATE (Nov 24th, 8pm ET): As I was informed, both on Twitter and in the comments, the update has been restored. Apparently the issue was that this tool, when upgrading Windows 10 to Windows 10 1511, accidentally reset four privacy settings to default. They also happened to be four of the less-severe ones, such as whether to allow apps to run in the background and whether settings should sync between devices. It has apparently been fixed and the tool will install the latest version of Windows 10 once more.

Source: Ars Technica

Regardless of your opinion about Windows 10, I'm glad that Microsoft has once again provided a way to force a specific version on your device. Their recent statement, telling users that Windows Update will give them the correct build eventually, is not comforting if someone is failing to receive the update. Is it coming? Or did it block for some reason? I also wonder if the 30-day policy would still be enforced, making clean installs that much more annoying. Turns out it was all hypothetical, and Microsoft was planning on reinstating it instantly, though.

This is a bit surprising and disappointing. When the November 2015 update for Windows 10 went live, existing users could upgrade with Windows Update (if it let them) and the rest could force an in-place upgrade from Windows 7, 8.x, and earlier builds of Windows 10 using the tool. The latter method has apparently been reverted to the original Windows 10 build from July 2015.


This image is getting a lot more use than I intended.

Why? Who knows. They are still offering the update through Windows Update, and Microsoft claims that they have no intention of pulling it. This concerns me, because there are a few situations where Windows 10 updates will get stuck, such as if you get it through Windows Update then uninstall it. I have not seen any report cover the official procedure for this issue. Also, I wonder if there's a way to get past Microsoft's 30-day no-update policy.

According to WinBeta, Microsoft's official statement contains the following: “Microsoft has not pulled the Windows 10 November 10 update. The company is rolling out the November update over time – if you don’t see it in Windows Update, you will see it soon.” (Emphasis not mine.)

We'll probably hear more about this as the week goes on.

Source: WinBeta

Even more keyboards, check out Thermaltake's Poseidon Z RGB

Subject: General Tech | November 23, 2015 - 03:16 PM |
Tagged: poseidon Z RGB, thermaltake, mechanical keyboard, input

The keyboard market has changed drastically over the past year with the introduction of mainstream mechanical keys and improved LED backlighting features.  Where once the market was not that competitive and only a few major players were offering products we now have a wide variety of brands to choose from.  This makes it hard to stand out in the market without adding extra features to your keyboards, which leads us to the Thermaltake Poseidon RGB.  This particular keyboard has an integrated 32-bit processor which allows you to choose between 16.8 million colors for each key.  The keys use Kailh Brown RGB switches, a less expensive clone of the Cherry MX Brown switches more commonly found on these types of boards.  Find out if they are good enough over at Benchmark Reviews.


"Just a few months ago, full RGB mechanical keyboards were rare beasts, and the inclusion of full per-key RGB lighting commanded a very high price, with some keyboards selling for almost $200.00. Now, prices are coming down rapidly and vendors are starting to compete on features, but how many more features are there left to add?"

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Software Development Debate: Design vs Profile

Subject: General Tech | November 22, 2015 - 02:08 PM |
Tagged: software development

This is article is a bit different from what we normally post, so be sure to give your opinion in the comments if you want to see more of this (or not). You will most often find these types of software development rants on a programmer's personal blog, but I find them interesting so here we go.


There are two camps in software development regarding optimization, each with diehard advocates. One side argues for software to be strictly designed, with decisions needing to be coherent and performance-minded. The other viewpoint claims that optimization should be done after profiling, because you could spend weeks making a fairly useless chunk of code purr like a kitten, and ignore the turkey that's using 99.99% of your resources.

Both sides can also point to situations that validate their opinion. The latter, “don't premature optimize” crowd can show examples where time is wasted because the engineer didn't look before they leaped. One such story comes from Chandler Carruth of Google. One of his first tasks at the company was to review code from Ken Thompson, a “very senior engineer” who created Unix and defined UTF-8. It solved rule-matching with about a 20-fold increase in performance over what they were currently using. When Chandler went to integrate the fix, his colleague mentioned “Yeah, turns out our use-case overwhelmingly hits a single rule, so I just check it first. It's now 100x faster.”

The other crowd says that, even if you can find exactly where poop stinks, you're still polishing a turd. One issue that is commonly pointed to is garbage collection. In memory-managed languages, this process scans through your application to delete unused chunks. Its goal is to remove memory leaks without users needing to carefully manage allocation themselves. The problem is that it necessarily freezes basically every thread and often takes several frames worth of time to complete. As such, you can either live with the bad user experience in real-time applications, or you can carefully design your application to avoid leaking memory. If you take the time to design and architect, it allows you to either choose a framework without garbage collection, or sometimes reduce / eliminate how often it triggers.

So the argument is over-thinking wasting time versus under-planning painting software into corners. As it should be somewhat obvious, both are correct. It's a bad idea to blindly charge into development, and it's good to think about the consequences of what you're doing. At the same time, what you think means nothing if it differs from what you measure, so you need to back up your thoughts with experimentation.

The challenge is to coast the middle for the benefits of both, without falling into the traps on either side.

Rdio Slowly Shutting Down Starting November 23rd

Subject: General Tech | November 22, 2015 - 12:35 AM |
Tagged: rdio

I say slowly shutting down because the service will remain active for a little while, letting users finish their subscriptions or use the free option. As of now, the only announced date is that Rdio will no longer renew subscriptions (or accept new paying customers) on November 23rd.


The company recently filed for bankruptcy, after trying to raise more capital and find other ways to keep the business running. Pandora will pay $75 million for the remnants of the service, although that could change if a better offer surfaces or an issue arises in bankruptcy protection. The press release states that “many members of the Rdio team will continue to shape the future of streaming music, applying our tradition of great design and innovative engineering on an even larger stage with Pandora.” It further states “Pandora is not acquiring the operating business of Rdio,” but rather just “the technology and talent.”

Rdio has not given a date that their service will end. This news is disappointing for me, because Rdio was the first music streaming service in Canada, at least that I found out about, which led me to choose it.

Source: Rdio

Should you fear SilverPush?

Subject: General Tech | November 20, 2015 - 02:22 PM |
Tagged: security, silverpush, fud

SilverPush has been around for a while but was recently reverse-engineered so that it could be investigated by anyone with an interest in their phones security.  It is software that is often bundled in advertisements or streamed media that takes advantage of your phones the far greater range of audio sensitivity and the fact that you can communicate information via audio signals.  This could allow an app to communicate with your phone without your knowledge, to collect data from your phone or even to provide contextual ads on your phone.

However as you can see from the list of apps which The Register links to, there is not much likelihood that you have an app which has SilverPush enabled installed on your phone and that is the real key.  If you do not have an app which is listening for audio signals on those frequencies then you will not suffer the effects of SilverPush.  The moral of the story is that your phones security starts with you, if you download random free apps and allow them full access to your phone then you should not be surprised by this sort of thing.


"SilverPush's software kit can be baked into apps, and is designed to pick up near-ultrasonic sounds embedded in, say, a TV, radio or web browser advert. These signals, in the range of 18kHz to 19.95kHz, are too high pitched for most humans to hear, but can be decoded by software."

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Source: The Register

Podcast #376 - Intel Speed Shift, CPU Coolers from Noctua and DEEPCOOL, Broadwell-E Rumors, and more!

Subject: General Tech | November 19, 2015 - 02:42 PM |
Tagged: podcast, video, noctua, Deepcool, Gamer Storm Gabriel, Intel, speed shift, amd, R9, fury x, trixx, Broadwell-E, kaby lake, nvidia, shield tablet k1, knights landing, asus, chromebit

PC Perspective Podcast #376 - 11/19/2015

Join us this week as we discuss Intel Speed Shift, CPU Coolers from Noctua and DEEPCOOL, Broadwell-E Rumors, and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: - Share with your friends!

  • iTunes - Subscribe to the podcast directly through the iTunes Store
  • RSS - Subscribe through your regular RSS reader
  • MP3 - Direct download link to the MP3 file

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, and Sebastian Peak

Program length: 1:19:22

  1. Week in Review:
  2. 0:32:10 This episode of PC Perspective Podcast is brought to you by Braintree. Even the best mobile app won’t work without the right payments API. That’s where the Braintree v.0 SDK comes in. One amazingly simple integration gives you every way to pay. Try out the sandbox and see for yourself at braintree­
  3. News item of interest:
  4. Hardware/Software Picks of the Week:
  5. Closing/outro

Subscribe to the PC Perspective YouTube Channel for more videos, reviews and podcasts!!

Two new SDKs aimed at VR performance join NVIDIA's GameWorks

Subject: General Tech | November 19, 2015 - 12:22 PM |
Tagged: gameworks vr, designworks vr, virtual reality, NVIDA, sdk

There is something about this phrase which describes a feature of NVIDIA's newly announced VR SLI that excites the kid in me "multiple GPUs can be assigned a specific eye to dramatically accelerate stereo rendering".  Maybe you can't afford two GPUs per eye but the fact that it would work if you could manage it is rather impressive.  NVIDIA has announced new SDKs specifically aimed at VR design and performance, GameWorks VR and DesignWorks VR.  Epic has announced that Unreal Engine 4.3 will support these new tools and you can grab them from NVIDIA's developer website right now if you so desire.  You can read more about specific features and optimizations these SDKs will provide at this article on The Inquirer.


"The company said at the release of version 1.0 of GameWorks VR and DesignWorks VR that the SDKs will solve the power-guzzling problems associated with complex, immersive VR graphics processing."

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Source: The Inquirer

Logitech's Artemis Spectrum headset; 7.1 audiophile quality?

Subject: General Tech | November 18, 2015 - 05:28 PM |
Tagged: logitech, G633 Artemis Spectrum, 7.1 headset

Logitech talks big about their G633 Artemis Spectrum gaming headsets, with audiophile-like quality and seven adjustable audio channels along with the good old .1 bass channel.  They do have a history of producing quality audio products and so Techgage set out to determine how well Logitech did on these headsets.  The software allows you, among other things, to choose between DTS Headphone X and Dolby Surround modes, with each channels volume being adjustable in Dolby mode; effectively from what Techgage could hear when gaming.  In the end the $149.99 MSRP and audio quality nowhere near the levels an audiophile would want prevented Techgage from loving the G633 but for atmospheric gaming these are a decent choice for the well off gamer.


"When Logitech announced its Artemis Spectrum gaming headsets, it said that they would deliver “audiophile-like” sound. Now, that’s a lofty promise. The company sent us the wired version, the G633, for us to review. Does it live up to its divine name and ambitious promises, or does it fall short, leaving us mere mortals still hunting for a god-like audio experience?"

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Source: Techgage

Hard West is here; get your eldritch western fix

Subject: General Tech | November 18, 2015 - 01:35 PM |
Tagged: hard west, Unity, gaming

If you backed the Kickstarter then you have had a chance to watch Hard West evolve from a single silent map to the recent update which added significant content and changed the beginning of the game significantly.  You are a dead gunslinger, brought back to an undead state in a western setting which incorporates not only natives and townsfolk but dark supernatural creatures and powers as well.  The game plays like the recent XCOM releases, with a similar turn style and cover system but also incorporates unique features such as the ability to ricochet bullets of some items on the map to shoot around corners and a shadow system designed to give you hints about who might be standing around a corner.

Nighttime changes the game dramatically and the optional permanent injury system is the exact opposite of the recent Warhammer games, severely injured members your posse will suffer negatives in the short term but possibly gaining strength once their wounds have fully healed.  You can see what Rock, Paper, SHOTGUN thought of the game here or just pick it up on Steam for $22.

"“Wild West XCOM” is about as good an elevator pitch as you could wish for. After a short delay, as of today we can find out whether Hard West can possibly live up to its glorious high concept. I played an earlier build a few weeks back – some thoughts, plus a launch trailer, below."

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Meet the Boltzmann Initiative, AMD's answer to HPC

Subject: General Tech | November 18, 2015 - 12:35 PM |
Tagged: amd, firepro, boltzmann, HPC, hsa

AMD has announced the Boltzmann Initiative to compete against Intel and NVIDIA in the HPC market this week at SC15.  It is not a physical product but rather new a way to unite the processing power of HSA compliant AMD APUs and FirePro GPUs.  They have announced several new projects including the Heterogeneous Compute Compiler (HCC) and Heterogeneous-compute Interface for Portability (HIP) for CUDA based apps which can automatically convert CUDA code into C++.  They also announced a headless Linux driver and HSA runtime infrastructure interface for managing clusters which utilizes their InfiniBand fabric interconnect to interface system memory directly to GPU memory as well as adding P2P GPU support and numerous other enhancements.   Check out more at DigiTimes.


"The Boltzmann Initiative leverages HSA's ability to harness both central processing units (CPU) and AMD FirePro graphics processing units (GPU) for maximum compute efficiency through software."

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Source: DigiTimes

Asus Chromebit CS10 Runs Google's Chrome OS Anywhere for $85

Subject: General Tech | November 18, 2015 - 12:47 AM |
Tagged: SFF, hdmi stick, hdmi, chromebit, chrome os, asus, arm

Small form factor PCs are big this year, and Google is about to get into the game with its own HDMI dongle PC running Chrome OS. Google has partnered with Asus to release the Chromebit CS10 which is now avaialble for $85.

Asus Chromebit Mini PC.png

The small stick PC weighs 75 grams (2.6 ounces) and will come in black, orange, and eventually blue colors. The Chromebit is about the size of a flash drive with an HDMI port on one end, DC power input on one side, and a single USB 2.0 port on the other end. A removeable cap protects the HDMI output. It is small enough that you can toss it into a bag or tuck it behind a monitor or kiosk permanently. Asus includes an AC power adapter (18W, 1.5 amps) and a flexible HDMI connector (or a short extension cable depending on the region) along with velco stickers in the box.

The Chromebit CS10 is powered by a quad core Rockchip 3288-C SoC featuring four ARM Cortex A17 CPU cores and a Mali T624 GPU. The SoC is paired with 2GB of LPDDR3 memory and 16GB of eMMC storage. Connectivity includes 802.11ac Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.0 radios along with the USB 2.0 port. Users can hook up a bluetooth keyboard and mouse and use the USB port for extra storage, or hook up even more devices using a USB hub.

So far, reviews are positive and generally state that (for example) while the Rockchip ARM processor is no racehorse, it is good enough for basic web browsing, media streaming, and document editing.

Of course, the Chromebit runs the Chrome web browser, but it also can run any of the apps from the Chrome Web Store including Netflix, Office, and any number of free games. Asus is aiming the Chromebit at digital signage, kiosk, thin clients for schools, and for on-the-go travelers.

The Chromebit CS10 is available soon (it is listed as out of stock on Newegg and has not shown up on Amazon or other sites yet) for $85 in the US, UK, Australia, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Japan, New Zealand, Norway, Spain, Sweden, and Taiwan. Business customers can further purchase the ability to use the Chromebit in a locked down single-app kiosk mode for $24 per user, per year from CDW.

Also read:

Source: Asus