VIA is not dead yet; maybe?

Subject: General Tech | February 20, 2014 - 01:36 PM |
Tagged: VIA, rumours

VIA, that once famous company which has petered out in the North American market is back in the news.  According to DigiTimes they recently joined forces with a firm owned by the Chinese government and is now moving production over to new facilities.  VIA has only 20% of this new joint venture which could signal the final end to their existence as a producer of x86 processors.  The move could be influenced by Intel, who license both the PCIe and x86 technology to VIA but this is deemed unlikely as Intel would like to stay on the Chinese governments good side.  The current Nano and V7 are Vista capable and appear in mobile devices in the AP region.

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"VIA Technologies is rumored to have started shifting its x86 CPU technologies and related personnel to its newly formed IC design joint venture with a China government-owned investment firm, according to market watchers, adding that VIA recently notified clients that it will stop supplying x86 processors temporarily."

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Source: DigiTimes

Square Enix Interested in Final Fantasy PC

Subject: General Tech | February 20, 2014 - 02:40 AM |
Tagged: square enix, pc gaming, final fantasy

Update: Fixed a couple of points as per the comments.

Final Fantasy might be returning to the PC as its publisher, Square Enix, grows more interested in the platform. Final Fantasy VII and VIII were both available on the PC within a few months of their original PlayStation releases. Since then, Final Fantasy was basically non-existent on the platform, beyond the two MMO releases (XI and XIV).

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Within the last year, both titles were re-released on Steam to decent sales. Yoshinori Kitase, producer for the franchise, told Eurogamer that this popularity has grabbed their attention. He acknowledged that the developer does not have a lot of experience with creating a good PC experience, but they could be very interested in the future.

It's an early stage for us. We haven't got an awful lot of experience in this field. So when we have more know-how and experience in this market we would be very interested.

Kitase also noted that, by ignoring the PC platform, their games are completely off the table in several markets. He did not mention any markets by name, but China only recently reopened its borders to Microsoft, Sony, and Nintendo after banning them in 2000. In Brazil, a PS4 launched at a little over 3x the US price, after converting into USD, because of tax and other distribution issues.

Also, while not mentioned in the article, Square Enix has been very active in porting their back-catalog to mobile platforms. This seems to be a time of re-evaluation for the company. While they have had recent troubles with projecting sales figures, mostly with Eidos releases, they have at least dodged Games for Windows Live in favor of Steam.

Also, ending with a pun, Final Fantasy VII supports Cloud Saves. Hehehe.

Source: Eurogamer

Wolfenstein: The New Order Pre-Order Includes Doom Beta

Subject: General Tech | February 19, 2014 - 07:22 PM |
Tagged: wolfenstein, Doom 4, bethesda

Of course, many will disagree with the concept of pre-ordering. Many have said that you should wait until reviews are released before making a purchase. Ironically, a couple of these people have also argued against the merits of game reviews, which is food for thought. Still, there is a solid argument for not spending your money blindly. It can be nice to get bonus content for reserving copies, such as developer commentary, but it can easily get ridiculous.

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What if I don't own that platform!!!

In this case, if you pre-order Wolfenstein: The New Order, you will get access to the beta for the upcoming Doom game (carefully not called, "Doom 4") inside the box. Unfortunately, they will not provide much more details than that. They will not mention whether it will be single-player or multiplayer, when it will start, how long it will last, or what platforms it will occur on.

"Beta timing and platform options are subject to Bethesda Softworks' discretion."

Personally, I cannot see how this would be possible. Wouldn't it be absolutely terrible PR if a gamer purchased Wolfenstein for a platform that the Doom Beta was not available for? I would have to expect that this is only in there for legal reasons, in case an issue arises. Still, that would absolutely suck. Bethesda does like the PC platform, however. I guess we have that going for us.

Wolfenstein: The New World Order will be available on May 20th in North America.

Source: Bethesda

Irrational Games Implodes with Controlled Demolition

Subject: Editorial, General Tech | February 19, 2014 - 06:15 PM |
Tagged: bioshock infinite

The team behind the original BioShock and Bioshock: Infinite decided to call it quits. After seventeen years, depending on where you start counting, the company dissolved to form another, much smaller studio. Only about fifteen employees will transition to the new team. The rest are provided financial support, given a bit of time to develop their portfolios, and can attend a recruitment day to be interviewed by other studios and publishers. They may also be offered employment elsewhere in Take-Two Interactive.

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The studio formed by the handful of remaining employees will look to develop games based on narrative, which is definitely their strength. Each game will be distributed digitally and Take-Two will continue to be their parent company.

While any job loss is terrible, I am interested in the future project. BioShock: Infinite sold millions of copies but I wonder if its size ultimately caused it harm. It was pretty and full of detail, at the expense of requiring a large team. The game had a story which respected your intelligence, you may not understand it and that was okay, but I have little confidence that it was anywhere close to the team's original vision. From budget constraints to the religious beliefs of development staff, we already know about several aspects of the game that changed significantly. Even Elizabeth, according to earlier statements from Ken Levine, was on the bubble because of her AI's complexity. I can imagine how difficult it is to resist those changes when seeing man-hour budgets. I cannot, however, imagine BioShock: Infinite without Elizabeth. A smaller team might help them concentrate their effort where it matters and keep artistic vision from becoming too dilute.

As for BioShock? The second part of the Burial at Sea DLC is said to wrap up the entire franchise. 2K will retain the license if they want to release sequels or spin-offs. I doubt Ken Levine will have anything more to do with it, however.

Can Titanfall really be as fun as it sounds?

Subject: General Tech | February 19, 2014 - 04:01 PM |
Tagged: gaming, titanfall, modding

If you didn't get lucky enough to get in on the Titanfall demo then all you can do is read the previews and wonder if what you are missing out on is really as good as people say it is.  The reviews we've seen have been very positive and describe what seems to be a new style of online shooter.  The basics remain the same and we have all seen footage of the 3 storey mechs which give the game its name but Rock, Paper, SHOTGUN also describes how parkour is a big part of the game and is easier to get used to than Mirror's Edge.  The launch process also sounds like an improvement, when starting you end up in a private area which makes it easy to pick who you play with if you have a group of up to 12 people together.  Even with the limit of 6 players per side the map won't feel empty thanks to the designed inclusion of bots on both teams.  It is also nice to hear that Respawn is already acknowledging the modding community for the PC version of their game.

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"There are a lot of different ways to make videogame fights meaningful. Singleplayer games do it by couching your shotgun blasts and pistol whips in the context of a story. Multiplayer games do it by emphasising competition via scoreboards, and by layering XP bonuses and equipment progression on top as rewards for each kill. Titanfall aims to do it with a mixture of all of the above, and based on its limited beta, finds mixed success."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Gaming

Another reason to toss a Tomato onto your router

Subject: General Tech | February 19, 2014 - 12:33 PM |
Tagged: security, router, TheMoon

A worm known as TheMoon has been in the news recently but the actual infection of Linksys routers has likely been spreading for quite a while now.  You may have also read about the backdoor on Linksys/Cisco and Netgear routers which as been open for almost a decade and can be as simple as connecting to port 8083 if you can get direct access to the router.  Some of these vulnerabilities can be mitigated by turning off remote administration and uPNP services but it seems your consumer level router is still a huge security risk.  Your best bet is to spend a weekend and follow the advice of most Slashdot commentators; flash your router with OpenWRT or a version of Tomato and you will have better security and control over your router.  Just don't do it to the modem your ISP provided you with.

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"The remote-access management flaw that allowed TheMoon worm to thrive on Linksys routers is far from the only vulnerability in that particular brand of hardware, though it might be simpler to call all home-based wireless routers gaping holes of insecurity than to list all the flaws in those of just one vendor. An even longer list of Linksys (and Cisco and Netgear) routers were identified in January as having a backdoor built into the original versions of their firmware in 2005 and never taken out."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Slashdot

Intel Roadmap Including Xeon E7 v2 Lineup

Subject: General Tech, Processors, Mobile | February 19, 2014 - 03:28 AM |
Tagged: Intel, SoC, atom, haswell, Haswell-E, Airmont, Ivy Bridge-EX

Every few months, we get another snapshot at some of Intel's products. This timeline has a rough placement for every segment, from their Internet of Things (IoT) product, the Quark, up to the Xeon E7 v2. While it covers from now through December, it is not designed to be a strict schedule and might contain an error or two.

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Image Credit: VR-Zone

First up is Ivy Bridge-EX (Xeon E7 v2). PCMag has an interesting rundown on these parts in depth, although some aspects are a little fuzzy. These 22nm-based chips range from 6 to 15 cores and can access up to 1.5TB of memory, per socket. Intel also claims they will support up to four times the I/O bandwidth for disk and network transactions. Naturally, they have all the usual virtualization and other features that are useful for servers. Most support Turbo Boost and all but one have Hyper-Threading Technology.

Jumping back to the VR-Zone editorial, the timeline suggests that the Quark X1000 will launch in April. As far as I can tell, this is new information. Quark is Intel's ultra low-end SoC that is designed for adding intelligence to non-computing devices. One example given by Intel at CES was a smart baby bottle warmer.

The refresh of Haswell is also expected to happen in April.

Heading into the third quarter, we should see Haswell-E make an appearance for the enthusiast desktop and moderately high-end server. This should be the first time since Sandy Bridge-E (2011) that expensive PCs get a healthy boost to single-threaded performance, clock for clock. Ivy Bridge-E, while a welcome addition, was definitely aimed at reducing power consumption.

Ending the year should be the launch of Airmont at 14nm. The successor to Silvermont, Airmont will be the basis of Cherry Trail tablets and lower end PCs at the very end of the year. Moorefield, which is Airmont for smartphones, is not listed on this roadmap and should not surface until 2015.

Source: VR-Zone

AMD Gaming Evolved App with Redeemable Prizes

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards | February 19, 2014 - 12:01 AM |
Tagged: raptr, gaming evolved, amd

The AMD Gaming Evolved App updates your drivers, optimizes your game settings, streams your gameplay to Twitch, accesses some social media platforms, and now gives prizes. Points are given for playing games using the app, optimizing game settings, and so forth. These can be exchanged for rewards ranging from free games, to Sapphire R9-series graphics cards.

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This program has been in beta for a little while now, without the ability to redeem points. The system has been restructured to encourage using the entire app by lowering the accumulation rate for playing games and adding other goals. Beta participants do not lose all of their points, rather it is rescaled more in line with the new system.

The Gaming Evolved prize program has launched today.

Press release after the teaser.

Source: raptr

NVIDIA Releases GeForce TITAN Black

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards | February 18, 2014 - 09:03 AM |
Tagged: nvidia, gtx titan black, geforce titan, geforce

NVIDIA has just announced the GeForce GTX Titan Black. Based on the full high-performance Kepler (GK110) chip, it is mostly expected to be a lower cost development platform for GPU processing applications. All 2,880 single precision (FP32) CUDA Cores and 960 double precision (FP64) CUDA Cores are unlocked, yielding 5.1 TeraFLOPs of 32-bit decimal and 1.3 TeraFLOPs of 64-bit decimal performance. The chip contains 1536kB of L2 Cache and will be paired with 6GB of video memory on the board.

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The original GeForce GTX Titan launched last year, almost to the day. Also based on the GK110 design, it also featured full double precision performance with only one SMX disabled. Of course, no component at the time contained a fully-enabled GK110 processor. The first product with all 15 SMX units active was not realized until the Quadro K6000, announced in July but only available in the fall. It was followed by the GeForce GTX 780 Ti (with a fraction of its FP64 performance) in November, and the fully powered Tesla K40 less than two weeks after that.

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For gaming applications, this card is expected to have comparable performance to the GTX 780 Ti... unless you can find a use for the extra 3GB of memory. Games do not display much benefit with the extra 64-bit floating point (decimal) performance because the majority of their calculations are at 32-bit precision.

The NVIDIA GeForce GTX Titan Black is available today at a price of $999.

Source: NVIDIA

Insert Thirty-Six Supapipe Jokes Here

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling | February 17, 2014 - 08:36 PM |
Tagged: passive cooling, cooling

Somewhere in the world, someone is developing a passively-cooled desktop made up of copper water pipes. Thirty-six (36) of them pass through what looks like an aluminum block attached to the socket LGA 1155 heatsink mount. As the copper pipes heat up, it passes to the air within it. Convection forces this to exhaust upward through the copper chimney and replaces it with cool air from below.

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All Images, Credit: "Monster", CoolEnjoy.net Forums

From the 3D prototype, it looks like two passively-cooled discrete GPUs are intended to fit just above the elbow in the chimney. Even from the rendering, it is clear that quite a lot of thought and effort has gone into this project. I cannot tell how they intend to access PCIe slots from up there, be it a larger motherboard or an extension adapter, but options probably exist.

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Initial testing with a Core i5-4440 (stock frequencies) show around 65 deg C at full CPU load. This should be in line with a typical air-based cooler.

Either way, this is the most impressive "SuperPipe" cooler that I have seen.

Your move, MSI.

Source: CoolEnjoy

A monster of a mouse, the Gila from Genius

Subject: General Tech | February 17, 2014 - 01:42 PM |
Tagged: gila, genius, GX, gaming mouse

Gaming mice have been changing over the past few years, no longer is having adjustable DPI enough to satisfy gamers, they want to be able to modify the X and Y axis independently and want huge amounts of programmable buttons.  The Gila from Genius is capable of both, indeed it can have 72 different mappings for the 10 buttons thanks to the 32K of onboard storage.  The MSRP is $65, if that is within your budget head over to Hi Tech Reviews to see their opinion of the mouse.

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"The Gila by Genius, a part of their GX Gaming line of PC gaming peripherals, is a mouse designed for MMO and RTS gaming. Genius, using the brand GX Gaming, has released the Gila gaming mouse which has eight additional buttons, adjustable weight, and adjustable DPI, from 200 up through 8200. "

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

VMWare makes vCloud Connector free

Subject: General Tech | February 17, 2014 - 12:21 PM |
Tagged: cloud, vmware, vcloud connector

Getting familiar with virtualization, especially VMWare's take on the technology is a wise decision for anyone planning on starting or continuing a career in IT.  Even if you never end up hosting your own cluster of VMs, being aware of what they are capable of will help you deal with vendors and salespeople.  It is now even easier to expand your knowledge of how multiple virtual machine clusters can communicate as VMWare has made their tool free to use.  This does assume you have VSphere and ESX based clusters but as that software is also available at no cost, that is not a tough prerequisite to meet.  Check out the links from The Register to see about creating your own interlinked cloud, or perhaps hooking into a friends.

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"VMware has released version 2.6 of its vCloud Connector tool, and dropped its price to $0. At current exchange rates that's £0 and $AUD0, for UK and Australian readers."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

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Source: The Register

Google Chrome To Compile Javascript Off Main Thread

Subject: General Tech | February 17, 2014 - 03:10 AM |
Tagged: web browser, Google Chrome, chromium

Google has announced that the latest beta for Chrome, their web browser, will compile Javascript in a background thread. In the current release version, scripts are converted to instructions, executed, monitored for performance, and swapped with a more optimized set of instructions that accomplishes the same tasks. Converting script into optimized instructions takes time. Doing it on a background thread frees up that computation time for something else.

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This stutter was 628 milliseconds, or about 38 consecutive frames at 60 FPS.

Image Credit: Chromium Project Blog

Web browsers are designed under the assumption that a single thread of instructions will weave through every task, one by one, until everything is done. At some point, since the early 1990s, computers have been give multiple cores (and some of those designs can have multiple threads shoved through at once). The problem is now that, since "Task A" was designed to occur before "Task B", doing them separately... can break stuff good.

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A simplified browser execution flowchart. Execution follows the arrow.

Image Credit: Mozilla

Background Javascript optimization will be most effective for mobile SoCs. These processors tend to have a lot of fairly slow cores; the exact opposite of what a web browser wants. Also, video games have many tasks which occur every frame. Freeing up time on the main thread gives these apps more time to be more complex - and with less stutter (if optimizing blocks execution... which it is trying to optimize). This might also allow browsers more time to try more aggressive optimization strategies.

In case you are wondering, Mozilla started to move compilation to a background thread as of Firefox 21. Firefox 29 will move the entire just-in-time (JIT) compilation process off the main thread. This is currently in their "Aurora" release channel. To the rest of the world: it's an alpha.

This optimization is currently available in Google Chrome Beta (33).

So When Exactly Will Microsoft Stop Selling Windows 7?

Subject: General Tech | February 16, 2014 - 10:39 PM |
Tagged: Windows 7

You cannot purchase a retail copy of Windows 7 at this point, officially. The last day of retail availability was October 30th, 2013. System builders can still include the operating system in their PCs, however, until October 31st, 2014.

Windows 7 Professional is the exception.

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The Windows lifecycle website claims that OEMs can include Professional in PCs until a to-be-announced date. That date will be at least one year after whenever they decide to announce it. As of February 16th, the date is still listed as "Not yet established".

I should note that Volume Licensing customers have downgrade rights and installation media available for the two versions prior to whatever is current. In short, they have their own timeline.

Basically, we know that preinstalled Windows 7 Professional availability is on a countdown timer. We know that timer is at least one year long. We do not know how much longer than a year it will be. We also do not know when the announcement will be made and thus, when the timer will start ticking.

The Ars Technica article claims that this Windows 7 Professional OEM extension is for business users. That said, a fair amount of those users are on volume licensing. Another possibility is that Microsoft wants to bridge the gap between Windows 7 and the rumored "Windows 9" for enthusiasts. "Threshold", as it is codenamed, is supposed to address users who are primarily in the desktop interface. Professional would give them devices to purchase until then, without the general public purchasing a cheap Windows 7 machine and intending to use it for a decade (potentially beyond Windows 7's EOL in 2020).

Windows 7 Home Basic, Home Premium, and Ultimate will no longer be preinstalled in PCs on October 31st, 2014. Windows 7 Professional will be available for some unannounced time afterward.

Source: Microsoft

Toshiba Goes up to 5TB with Enterprise 3.5-inch HDDs

Subject: General Tech, Storage | February 16, 2014 - 03:37 AM |
Tagged: toshiba, hdd, 5TB

We may see an internal hard drive with up to 5TB of storage from Toshiba. This is an enterprise SKU but, either way, it is a step beyond the tyranny of 3TB models dotted with 4TB options at a higher price per gigabyte. For example, Newegg.com lists a 3TB Caviar Green at $114 with the 4TB version going for $164.

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You might just be, Toshiba. You might just be.

The push to 3TB was fairly difficult, due mostly to software limitations in addressing more than about 2.2TB per drive. 3TB was uncommon for internal storage, although external USB drives avoided the issue. And then came the flood. Back in 2011, disastrous flooding exploded prices of hard drives. The world was cut to a fraction of its production. With standard 2TB drives over doubling in price, the industry took forever to return. Ryan, at the time (October 2011), noted that the days of 2TB for $89 would be gone for a while; that is the exact price which Newegg lists, today. Even worse, we basically did not see 4TB until almost 2013.

It is a good step, though. I hope this reaches other companies and the consumer space in reasonable time. While I am dreaming, just maybe it could push down prices on existing models? I am looking at you, 4TB disks.

Toshiba's MG04 series drives will be available in both SAS and SATA models with sizes up to 5TB. Samples will begin to ship this month.

Source: Toshiba

A Few Quarters Can Be All That Motorola Needs

Subject: General Tech, Mobile | February 15, 2014 - 11:47 PM |
Tagged: motorola, Lenovo, acquisition

According to Bloomberg, Lenovo's CEO has recently made a claim in a phone interview that, "In a few quarters we can turn around the business [Motorola]". Google is currently in the process of selling a subset of Motorola to Lenovo for $2.9 billion USD. When it was first announced, I assumed the deal was based on Motorola's brand power and their relationship with wireless carriers around the world.

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Now, two weeks later, Lenovo outlines their plan. The company expects to push Motorola into China, emerging markets, and even existing ones. Lenovo's CEO, Yang Yuanqing, believes that customers will positively identify with the brand, especially in China. They are planning to relaunch the brand in China and become a stronger third-place competitor (globally).

The company also disclosed that approximately 3,500 employees would carry over with this acquisition.

Source: Bloomberg

AMD Radeon R9 290X Hits $900 on Newegg. Thanks *coin

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards | February 14, 2014 - 06:02 PM |
Tagged: supply shortage, shortage, R9 290X, podcast, litecoin, dogecoin, bitcoin

UPDATE (Feb 14th, 11pm ET): As a commenter has pointed out below, suddenly, as if by magic, Newegg has lowered prices on the currently in stock R9 290X cards by $200.  That means you can currently find them for $699 - only $150 over the expected MSRP.  Does that change anything about what we said above or in the video?  Not really.  It only lowers the severity.

I am curious to know if this was done by Newegg voluntarily due to pressure from news stories such as these, lack of sales at $899 or with some nudging from AMD...

If you have been keeping up with our podcasts and reviews, you will know that AMD cards are great compute devices for their MSRP. This is something that cryptocurrency applies a value to. Run a sufficient amount of encryption tasks and you are rewarded with newly created tokens (or some fee from validated transactions). Some people seem to think that GPUs are more valuable for that purpose than their MSRP, so retailers raise prices and people still buy them.

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Currently, the cheapest R9 290X is being sold for $900. This is a 64% increase over AMD's intended $549 MSRP. They are not even the ones receiving this money!

This shortage also affects other products such as Corsair's 1200W power supply. Thankfully, only certain components are necessary for mining (mostly GPUs and a lot of power) so at least we are not seeing the shortage spread to RAM, CPUs, APUs, and so forth. We noted a mining kit on Newegg which was powered by a Sempron processor. This line of cheap and low-performance CPUs has not been updated since 2009.

We have kept up with GPU shortages, historically. We did semi-regular availability checks during the GeForce GTX 680 and 690 launch windows. The former was out of stock for over two months after its launch. Those also sometimes strayed from their MSRP, slightly.

Be sure to check out the clip (above) for a nice, 15-minute discussion.

Sounds like it is time for a roundup; headphone style

Subject: General Tech | February 14, 2014 - 03:28 PM |
Tagged: audio, roundup, headphones

The Inquirer has put together a list of the 14 best headphones released so far this year, including both on ear and over the ear styles.  You won't find a single Beats model in this roundup but you will hear about a wide range of best in class headphones from a wide variety of uses from the cheapest pair that still sounds good to the best ones for travelling.  Just don't buy the ones with frogs on them.

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"Long gone are the days when people felt too embarrassed to wear a hefty pair of cans on their heads in the fear that they'd be accused to trying to look like an Ibiza DJ wannabe. The hype about on-ear headphones has helped convince the masses that, "Actually, these clumsy looking music accessories are pretty cool," or, "Why shouldn't I wear them with pride on the Tube after forking out hundreds for them?""

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Audio Corner

Source: The Inquirer

Sorry China, no Kabini for you

Subject: General Tech | February 14, 2014 - 02:43 PM |
Tagged: amd, Kabini

As you may have heard mention of on the podcast last night, AMD has a habit of crowding the lower end of the CPU and GPU markets with a wde variety of choices of product separated by very little money.  While this can lead some entry level PC buyers to a bit of confusion at first, having a wide variety of choices is a good thing for the consumer.  DigiTimes reported on an interesting decision made by AMD which bucks that trend, at least in China.  It would seem that instead of releasing Kabini there, AMD is depending on the deep price cuts they've applied to previous generations of APU to compete against Intel as those price cuts would make Kabini much less attractive in that market.  As a bonus we also received confirmation that Beema is still on schedule for the second half of this year.

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"AMD is expected to ship 300,000 Kabini processors in the first quarter of 2014, 1.2 million units in the first half, and 3.8-3.9 million units in the whole year, the sources indicated."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: DigiTimes

Podcast #287 - AMD R7 265, Coin Mining's effect on GPU Prices, NVIDIA Earnings and more!

Subject: General Tech | February 14, 2014 - 02:11 PM |
Tagged: video, r9 270x, r7 265, r7 260x, podcast, nvidia, fusion-io, arm, amd, A17

PC Perspective Podcast #287 - 02/14/2014

Join us this week as we discuss the release of the AMD R7 265, Coin Mining's effect on GPU Prices, NVIDIA Earnings and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

  • iTunes - Subscribe to the podcast directly through the iTunes Store
  • RSS - Subscribe through your regular RSS reader
  • MP3 - Direct download link to the MP3 file

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath and Allyn Malventano

 
Program length: 1:09:27
 
  1. Week in Review:
  2. News items of interest:
  3. Hardware/Software Picks of the Week:
  4. Closing/outro

Be sure to subscribe to the PC Perspective YouTube channel!!