SK Hynix Develops 128GB Stick of DDR4 RAM

Subject: General Tech, Memory | April 7, 2014 - 11:03 PM |
Tagged: Hynix, ddr4

... I'll take two.

SK Hynix, one of the leading producers of RAM modules, announced a single stick of DDR4 with 128GB capacity. While this is intended for the server room, I hope that we will see workstation components attempt to be compatible in the near future. It is difficult to find a board that can support more than 64GB at all, let alone twice that, per stick.

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As for the typical desktop users? Let's face it, this is overkill, eight times over, generously, per stick. Web browsers are beginning to ring up the memory usage as more and more tabs are loaded simultaneously but, otherwise, there is little use for it for them.

But for those of us who are not them, this could be awesome. It is still unclear how much memory a Haswell-EX motherboard, running on an Intel X99 chipset, will support. I can assume that this stick will not be compatible... but we can always hope, right?

Source: SK Hynix
April 8, 2014 | 12:16 AM - Posted by pdjblum

How about a whole bunch of it dedicated to AMD ramdisk? Wonder if that would work?

April 8, 2014 | 05:00 AM - Posted by collie (not verified)

It does seem like WAY overkill, but we did say the same thing about 128mb dimms back when 4mb was standard. its hard to conceive what would need 1/8tb to 1/2tb of ram but you never know what the future will hold. will we see systems with 256gb ram and 40tb hard drives as low end standard? I'd love to see that but what would be the applications of said system. Future gen mac pro perhaps? 16k video editing? or {this just occurred to me} using a Rift type rig to create a virtual desk with dozens of virtual monitors? who knows

April 8, 2014 | 06:54 AM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

Adobe CS will eat up every last bit of RAM when you're working with batches of uncompressed images or real-time previews of 2K+ video. 32GB isn't enough in some scenarios. My biggest regret was building a i7 computer limited to 32GB RAM instead of a Xeon-based build that can support much, much more. Next cycle...

April 8, 2014 | 09:32 AM - Posted by brisa117

I agree. I work with After Effects often and watch my RAM usage climb up and plateau just below the maximum 32GB that my system has. I doubt that I would ever have a rendering job at 1080p that would go up to 128GB of RAM, but when 4K video editing and special effects comes into play, 32GB will be menial.

Saying that any amount of RAM is overkill is THE classic shortsighted statement by Bill Gates himself. There's no reason to repeat it. : P

April 8, 2014 | 12:42 PM - Posted by collie (not verified)

having this amount of ram isn't overkill. having 4 of these dimms installed is what's overkill. I dont care what you are doing, nothing you can do today will eat THAT much ram. but it would be super cool to have

April 9, 2014 | 03:47 PM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

Rendering large high-poly mesh model scenes with all the bells and whistles turned on, will gladly eat up all of that memory, berp and ask for more, And I am not talking about gaming where the meshes are deciminated down and skinned/textured, but rendering that takes some hours, and with per frame rates in the 1 per 15 to 30 min rate. Having everythig in memory and not on disk/ssd can really speed things along. A small operation with everyone shareing the rendering server could very well utilize 4 of these dimms and more, there can never be enough memory.

April 8, 2014 | 09:13 AM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

Overkill schmoverkill. I don't know a nerd out there that wouldn't take 1TB of RAM just for shits and giggles (so long as it doesn't cost $10,000).

Hell, no size will ever satisfy my greedy thirst.

April 9, 2014 | 07:48 AM - Posted by Illford (not verified)

So I hear you want your steam library on a ramdisk....

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