Quantum computing goes through an atomic transition

Subject: General Tech | November 15, 2013 - 01:13 PM |
Tagged: qubit, quantum computing

Researchers at the Canadian Simon Fraser University have made major progress in creating stable qubits, managing to store information for over half an hour which is a huge jump from the previous record which was measured in seconds.  That length of time also allowed them to bring the temperature of the qubit from near absolute zero to 25C which makes the usage of qubits much more feasible.  The data retention still needs to be improved as only a third of the nuclei actually succeeded in holding data, connectivity is also something which needs to be developed but now that the lifespan of qubits has been increased this work can be done. Dig deeper into the details of this development at The Register and have fun watching TV news casters who have no grasp of bits, let alone superposition, attempt to explain this research

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"Researchers have managed to store information in a qubit – a quantum computer's binary bit – and maintain it in a superposition state, where ones and zeros exist simultaneously, for 39 minutes, beating the previous record of just a few seconds"

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Source: The Register
November 15, 2013 | 08:47 PM - Posted by Amgal (not verified)

Dig deeper into the details of this development at The Register and have fun watching TV news casters who have no grasp of bits, let alone superposition, attempt to explain this research

The humor-centric writing style of the authors here are what keeps me coming back.

November 16, 2013 | 10:57 AM - Posted by Llama (not verified)

I completely agree. Im waiting to see if they announce this in my local news station and i wanna see them try to explain it.

November 17, 2013 | 03:13 AM - Posted by IndoAssassin (not verified)

Oh Canada

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