Poor yeilds will delay 14nm Broadwell chips

Subject: General Tech | October 16, 2013 - 10:12 AM |
Tagged: Intel, delay, Broadwell, 14nm

Sad news for those hoping to see Broadwell as Brian Krzanich confirmed that the delays we first heard about in June are still true and Broadwell will not be available until some time in 2014.  This slowdown of their Tick Tick strategy has been caused by the high density of defects on wafers which is driving the yields down on these chips which not only leads to less profitability but also means that supplies will be too low to go to market with.  He did give The Register some positive news, Intel is working on reducing the time it takes to implement changes to chips in production and within the next year they hope to be able to make changes to a chip three months before it is slated for release without negatively effecting yeilds.

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"One of the biggest tasks that Intel CEO Brian Krzanich has set himself is reconfiguring Chipzilla so that it's quicker to build and deploy new products.

So it's a pity he has had to delay the rollout of 14-nanometer Broadwell processor chips until the first quarter of next year due to problems with quality control."

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Source: The Register
October 16, 2013 | 06:45 PM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

Good luck overclocking these, just not enough atoms to transfer all the heat these densely packed transistors will produce! At some point, maybe 7nm or 5nm, these circuits will have to be placed farther apart on the silicon substrate to allow for heat transfer, and the die size will not be able to be made smaller using the current silicon based process tech! The transistors will be smaller and use less power, but the packing density/heat transfer will prevent any 1:1 scaleing! there are already some Fabs testing dual process nodes. The core war is about to begin(Again), With quad-cores on the low end and 6 and 8 cores for the higer end SKUs!

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