Microsoft's customers are not always right

Subject: General Tech | April 8, 2014 - 09:53 AM |
Tagged: winxp, microsoft, dumb

With around 95% of the world's ATMs and over 27% of PCs still running WinXP, not counting the ones hiding behind enterprise firewalls, it is rather ironic to refer to XP as dead.  Referring to it as unsupported is certainly more accurate though considering the number of governments and banks around the world which have paid Microsoft to extend support that is not completely factual either.  After 13 years of service, perhaps Microsoft has found a new business model to squeeze a bit more profit from WinXP by charging for updates; if they don't take advantage of it then there are third parties which would be more than happy to profit from those who plan to continue to use WinXP.

This forced upgrade makes some sense for Microsoft as it will lower the legacy workload that XP has caused over 3 new generations of OS but at the same time there is obviously money to be made from supporting large corporations, governments and institutions.  This will also cause a bit of a backlash in the boardroom as the lofty minds in upper management dig their heels in about having to learn a new interface and begin to question what happens when support for the version of Windows they chose to replace WinXP expires and they are again forced to spend huge amounts of money upgrading again.  It is unlikely that a large majority of these companies will make the move to Linux but they may well hear about that OS for the first time and consider testing it in limited fashion.  Two things are for certain; Microsoft has at the least annoyed some very powerful corporate heads and that no one will care when support for Vista ends in 2017.

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"Introduced by Microsoft in 2001, Windows "eXPerience" was the seventh version of Windows released by Microsoft as a convergent replacement for the short lived Windows 2000 and Windows ME, becoming Microsoft's first consumer PC operating system based on the Windows NT code base."

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Source: The Inquirer
April 8, 2014 | 12:06 PM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

ATM's run Windows XP Embedded which has extended support until Jan 2016.

April 8, 2014 | 01:02 PM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

Updated My XP laptop for the last time, and during the update MS security essentials' tray icon goes red and warns me that it is no longer supported, Not sure if M$ has disabled it or it is still working, as the tray icon usually goes to a yellow/orenge color if the virus definitions are not up to date, so what is with this red tray icon, very confusing M$. This is very confusing, does a red tray icon mean the virus software is disabled, or does it mean otherwise, there are going to be many people that will think the red tray icon means disabled, and uninstall what little protection there is. I guess it's time to download a 32 bit version of linux, but I'll keep the laptop offline for now. I still have XP and 7, but I will never have 8, and maybe 7 will be my last M$ OS. At least my newest laptop also ships with a SUSE distro from the OEM, so for that laptop I'll have an OS and drivers for after 2020. I see that many people will probably dual boot windows 7 with their favorite Linux distro, and after 7's EOL it's just a simple matter of deleting the 7 partition.
I sure hope that Steam OS becomes available for laptops, and that the major laptop OEM's provide support for Steam OS. M$ in so much control of the PC/laptop software ecosystem needs to become a thing of the past, and the sooner the better.

April 9, 2014 | 08:24 AM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

First of all, if you have MSE installed, Microsoft will continue supporting it for a limited period of time. Secondly, why do people think it's appropriate for a company to support a product indefinitely? Even when there is no chance of that product ever being able to function on new and upcoming products? I would love to be able to buy a car and have a warranty on it forever too, but that's never going to happen. Thirdly, yes, Windows 8.1 is different, but it's not a bad product at all. Under the hood it is substantially better than Windows 7. It also allows the use of that product on touchscreens. While that my not be important to some, but it does have its advantages. HTPCs, tablets etc. Also, remoting in on a tablet to a PC with Win 8.1 is excellent. I don't understand why people are so resistant to change. Haterz will always hate I suppose.

April 9, 2014 | 12:20 PM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

M$ MSE should not show a red tray icon, red is the universal color of a disabled security/virus program, and yes I had MSE on the XP laptop, for years. The tray Icon should be the standard Yellow/Orenge, with a note that MSE will no longer be supported, but that virus updates will still be provided for one more year(M$ relented with Virus updates continuing). But slapping a red color on the tray icon for MSE is only going to cause confusion! The XP laptop will probably be getting Linux Mint 32 bit, or other liteweight Linux distro for its celeron M 370 CPU! M$ appears to be on the classic downward spiral to insignificance, and is no longer able to have its way. I do not expect to update beyond windows 7, and will not buy new hardware that is attatched to any of M$ future offerings. This under the Hood crap, does not fly, as the hood is a terrable multicolored tile nightmare more fit for the clown car at a three ring circus!

P.S. If anyone other than this M$ spinion has any suggestions on a good XP based virus product, please reply.

April 9, 2014 | 11:31 PM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

Avast, Nod32, Malwarebytes, Adaware. Check those.

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