It's world IPv6 Day

Subject: General Tech, Networking | June 8, 2011 - 11:38 AM |
Tagged: what could go wrong, networking, ipv6, 404

On February 3 of this year, the last block of IPv4 addresses were allocated which brought IPv6 to the forefront of the minds of many network heads.  NAT and internal LANs can extend the usage of IPv4 for quite a while and many of the allocated addresses are not actually in use which is a good thing as not many OSes support IPv6 natively, nor do many network appliances.

That brings us to today, where many major websites are cumulating all of the internal testing they have been performning by doing a 24 hour dry run of IPv6.  Companies like Juniper and Cisco have been working to ensure their portion of the Internet's backbone will be able to handle the new addressing scheme so that clients can connect to the sites that are testing IPv6.  Google, Facebook, Yahoo and Bing have all turned on IPv6 as have several ISPs including Comcast, AT&T and Verizon, with Verizon's LTE mobile network are also testing IPv6.  You can see a full list of the participants here.

This will of course involve a little pain, as new technology does tend to have sharp edges.  You may well see a few 404's or have other problems when surfing the net today but overall it should not be too bad, Google predicts about a 1% failure rate.  The hackers will also be out to play today, likely using the larger sized packets for DDoS attacks.  Since the IPv6 packets are four times larger than an IPv6 packet, a flood of the new protocol will be super effective at DDoS attacks.  As well, most of the IPv6 packets will be bypassing companies current deep packet inspection hardware and software, IPv6 is not backwards compatible with IPv4 so the network appliances used for that type of scan simply cannot inspect IPv6 packets.  That is not to say that these devices cannot inspect IPv6 packets, simply that for a one day test major providers are reluctant to completely reprogram the devices.   In the case of an attack, most of the participants have a plan in place to revert immediately back to IPv4.

So, if possible on your machine, fire up IPv6 and give it a whirl.  There is a simple test here to see if you are IPv6 compliant and if it is enabled or a more comprehesive test here.

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"Sponsored by the Internet Society, World IPv6 Day runs from 8 p.m. EST Tuesday until 7:59 p.m. EST Wednesday. The IT departments in the participating organizations have spent the last five months preparing their websites for an anticipated rise in IPv6-based traffic, more tech support calls and possible hacking attacks prompted by this largest-ever trial of IPv6."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

June 8, 2011 | 12:27 PM - Posted by CoreyD (not verified)

List of OSs that support IPv6 natively (probably missing some too):
Windows 7
Windows Vista
Windows Server 2003
Windows Server 2008
Windows Server 2008 R2
Mac OS X
Red Hat (and most versions of Linux)

Not sure what you mean by "not many OSes support IPv6 natively"

June 8, 2011 | 02:45 PM - Posted by Jeremy Hellstrom

Well, IPv6 is of more interest to companies than to the home user. At the place I spend my days tied to a chair there are some servers running WinNT and some clients that still use Novell to log in. The majority of servers are Server 2000 (not Advanced) Add in a variety of legacy SUSE and other pre-linux flavours of Unix and ya, any OS before about 2003 does not support IPv6, which I would call the majority.

I've even heard tell of a user that still has Win98SE on our network, claims he has a legacy app that won't run on anything but 98 or ME.

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