Intel becomes a 22nm foundry -- no, not for NVIDIA.

Subject: General Tech, Mobile | March 25, 2012 - 05:42 PM |
Tagged: TSMC, nvidia, Intel

NVIDIA would like Intel to be their fab partner for ARM processors. Turns out NVIDIA-produced ARM products are not tempting to Intel.

Last month we reported that Intel would open up their fabrication plants to contracts from other companies. We stated that the world would likely end if Intel were to ever produce products from NVIDIA. It turns out that the world is safe.

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Turn out the lights, pretend we’re not home.

Intel is far and away the most advanced semiconductor fabricators in the world and many companies would love to have their components created in their factories. Intel is very aware of how sophisticated their technique is relative to their competitors and exercises that advantage.

NVIDIA currently fabricates their chips at TSMC. That partnership has proven to be slightly problematic to NVIDIA’s business goals. Their Kepler launch turned out to not be nearly as soft of a launch as was proposed by SemiAccurate -- but that is to be expected from a website by that name (especially with NVIDIA news).

Perhaps you were a little too greedy in requesting that Intel manufacture your ARM processors, NVIDIA? Maybe you should test the waters with a discrete GPU order or, you know, some other market that Intel does not compete in try as they might.

Even still, there was a rumor going around when Intel partnered with AMD for hardware-accelerated physics support. It does not seem like Intel really want to be friends. Plenty of fish in the sea, though.

Source: Forbes
March 28, 2012 | 07:13 AM - Posted by Kyle (not verified)

Umm... so... what is the point of this post? I don't see who Intel is a foundry for. How is this different from what was previously reported?

March 28, 2012 | 11:08 AM - Posted by Scott Michaud

NVIDIA has, since the last article, suggested to Intel that they manufacture ARM processors.

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