GLOBALFOUNDRIES goes 3D with 14nm FinFET transistors

Subject: General Tech | September 21, 2012 - 01:58 PM |
Tagged: 14nm, FinFET, 3d transistors, GLOBALFOUNDRIES, SoC

Intel was first out of the gate with their 3D transistors, which they dubbed Tri-gate and which the rest of the world refers to as FinFET as the normal 2D transistor is flipped on its side in a position reminiscent of a fin.  This leads to much more efficient power usage, perfect for mobile designs and needed as the transistor density at 14nm is going to be quite high.  GLOFO's 14nm eXtreme Mobility will work in conjunction with the current 20nm process used to fabricate SOCs and will be the basis of many lines of chips, such as ARM who have signed a multiyear contract with GLOFO.  Check out DigiTimes for more.

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"Globalfoundries has announced the launch of a new technology designed for the expanding mobile market. The new 14nm-XM offering will give customers the performance and power benefits of three-dimensional "FinFET" transistors with less risk and a faster time-to-market, helping the fabless ecosystem maintain its leadership in mobility while enabling a new generation of smart mobile devices, according to the foundry."

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Source: DigiTimes
September 21, 2012 | 03:35 PM - Posted by Thedarklord

I only hope they can provide more competition for TSMC, which will hopefully translate to lower prices and more availablity of GPU's/SoC's/Ect.

September 22, 2012 | 10:14 AM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

I don't understand why they feel they need to create faster and faster processers smaller and smaller, creating undue headaches.

I understand why things have to more forward and get smaller but sometimes it feels like shrinking for the sake of shrinking.

Can i just have a really big really really really fast processor? I promise i've got the room in my case... its not going anywhere.

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